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Coffee In Thailand


gennisis

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OK,I accept that it appears that the majority of the worlds coffe drinkers prefer coffee that has been highly roasted...ie French and Italian style.

Coming from UK and Bristol.we had a chain of Coffee suppliers 'Carwardines". They roasted their coffee by the open windows and the aroma as you passed made your mouth water. I always thought it smelt even better than it tasted.

Here in Thailand I have tried many many brands of Coffee,all of which smell and taste like a bonfire. Obviously Thai's like this high roasted taste.....I dont !! It is also very acidic.

Even the 'medium roast here is still too dark and burnt for me,and I did try a thia medium roast which did produce a lighter coloured cup,but was sadly lacking in taste.

So,can anyone suggest any solution?

To date the nearest I can get is 'Davidof' brand,but so expensive at 280 baht for a 200 grm bag.Ive tried imported American brands but again too dark and strong.

Living in Chiang Mai where there are a number of coffee suppliers,they all seem to grind the coffee at their premises and use pre-roasted beans. Does anyone know where they actualy roast the beans where perhaps I can get them to roast at a lower temperature?

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OK,I accept that it appears that the majority of the worlds coffe drinkers prefer coffee that has been highly roasted...ie French and Italian style.

Coming from UK and Bristol.we had a chain of Coffee suppliers 'Carwardines". They roasted their coffee by the open windows and the aroma as you passed made your mouth water. I always thought it smelt even better than it tasted.

Here in Thailand I have tried many many brands of Coffee,all of which smell and taste like a bonfire. Obviously Thai's like this high roasted taste.....I dont !! It is also very acidic.

Even the 'medium roast here is still too dark and burnt for me,and I did try a thia medium roast which did produce a lighter coloured cup,but was sadly lacking in taste.

So,can anyone suggest any solution?

To date the nearest I can get is 'Davidof' brand,but so expensive at 280 baht for a 200 grm bag.Ive tried imported American brands but again too dark and strong.

Living in Chiang Mai where there are a number of coffee suppliers,they all seem to grind the coffee at their premises and use pre-roasted beans. Does anyone know where they actualy roast the beans where perhaps I can get them to roast at a lower temperature?

Tried "The Hilltribe blue Mountain" ?

Doi Chaang Coffee

Boncafe

Xpresso-Thailand

Royal Thai Coffee

if this doesn't help... you may have to import your favorite caffeine kick...!

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I know this is sheer heresy, but have you tried the freeze dried coffee like Nescafe and Moccona? They seem to be less roasted than the regular coffee here is. I have adapted to the roasted taste somewhat, but I do prefer a lighter roast coffee and a mild non-acidic bean, like Costa Rica peaberry. Ah, Gevalia, I miss your delicious overpriced premium coffees...

The problem with the Thai-grown coffees is the problem with the standard American brands of coffee: arabica beans. Arabica beans grow where better beans won't. US coffee companies all increased the amount of arabica used in their brands two or three decades ago, to the point of being almost pure arabica beans. Better beans were getting expensive, so they took the cheap route. Arabica beans are the highly acidic ones, and they have caused standard American coffee to decline in quality.

Edited by cathyy
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I know this is sheer heresy, but have you tried the freeze dried coffee like Nescafe and Moccona? They seem to be less roasted than the regular coffee here is. I have adapted to the roasted taste somewhat, but I do prefer a lighter roast coffee and a mild non-acidic bean, like Costa Rica peaberry. Ah, Gevalia, I miss your delicious overpriced premium coffees...

The problem with the Thai-grown coffees is the problem with the standard American brands of coffee: arabica beans. Arabica beans grow where better beans won't. US coffee companies all increased the amount of arabica used in their brands two or three decades ago, to the point of being almost pure arabica beans. Better beans were getting expensive, so they took the cheap route. Arabica beans are the highly acidic ones, and they have caused standard American coffee to decline in quality.

Shows how little I know.!...I thought that the Arabica bean was the higher quality than the Robusta bean....lower yield but superior taste.....maybe I believe the adverts too much.

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Arabica beans are higher quality. The OP has a sensitive palate though. I love richly roasted the best.

Peets, considered among the best roasters in the US, uses only arabica beans. What more do you need to know? I don't think your problem is arabica beans, I think it is the roasting method.

I found a great local roaster in CM, perhaps someone can tell you exactly where it is. They have a good variety of blend options. All I can tell you about where it is, from Chang Puak Gate walk north on Chang Puak Road and then it is located well into a road to the right of that, also involving some other turns. Some CM readers may be able to tell you the name, my directions are not good enough, but they had the best coffee beans I ever had in Thailand. They also have a Bangkok location but off the tourist path.

Edited by Jingthing
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I know this is sheer heresy, but have you tried the freeze dried coffee like Nescafe and Moccona? They seem to be less roasted than the regular coffee here is. I have adapted to the roasted taste somewhat, but I do prefer a lighter roast coffee and a mild non-acidic bean, like Costa Rica peaberry. Ah, Gevalia, I miss your delicious overpriced premium coffees...

The problem with the Thai-grown coffees is the problem with the standard American brands of coffee: arabica beans. Arabica beans grow where better beans won't. US coffee companies all increased the amount of arabica used in their brands two or three decades ago, to the point of being almost pure arabica beans. Better beans were getting expensive, so they took the cheap route. Arabica beans are the highly acidic ones, and they have caused standard American coffee to decline in quality.

Shows how little I know.!...I thought that the Arabica bean was the higher quality than the Robusta bean....lower yield but superior taste.....maybe I believe the adverts too much.

Well then...

Coffee berries, which contain the coffee bean, are produced by several species of small evergreen bush of the genus Coffea. The two most commonly grown species are Coffea canephora (also known as Coffea robusta) and Coffea arabica. These are cultivated in Latin America, Southeast Asia, and Africa.
Coffea arabica is believed to be the first species of coffee to be cultivated, being grown in southwest Arabia for well over 1,000 years. It is considered to produce better coffee than the other major commercially grown coffee species,Arabica contains less caffeine than any other commercially cultivated species of coffee
Coffea canephora (Robusta Coffee; syn. Coffea robusta) is a species of coffee which has its origins in western Africa. It is grown mostly in Africa and Brazil, where it is often called Conillon. It is also grown in Southeast Asia where French colonists introduced it in the late 19th century. In recent years Vietnam, which only produces robusta, has surpassed Brazil, India, and Indonesia to become the world's single largest exporter. Approximately one third of the coffee produced in the world is robusta.

Canephora (robusta) is easier to care for than the other major species of coffee, Coffea arabica, and, because of this, is cheaper to produce. Since arabica beans are considered superior, robusta is usually limited to lower grade coffee blends as a filler. It is however often included in instant coffee, and in espresso blends to promote the formation of "crema". Robusta has about twice as much caffeine as arabica.

Quotes from Wikipedia

now you know!

We learn something new every day!

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I have tried MANY different brands here over the years and have settled for Nescafe Red Cup instant. Maybe my taste buds have just gotten used to it so that nothing else tastes right. At least it is very consistent.

A good Thai friend of mine has a small coffee shop. He uses the Au Boncafe beans or something spelled like that. It smells good when he grinds it and smells good when brewing but I would rather have my instant Red Cup.

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Too late, polecat! Nothing more (a)rousing than the smell of fresh coffee.

The OP's tastes are so different from mine that I can't come up with a single bon mot, much less a recommendation. :o even though I've drunk at least five cups of dark-roasted Thai arabica today.

The problem with most Thai arabicas - although it doesn't sound like it would be a problem for the OP - is that they're not bright (acidic) enough. They remind me of Kona, Sulawesi, Sumatra coffees, with that smooth, rounded mouthfeel that stoners seem to like. I'm in the camp that prefers a balance of flavours leaning towards bright, combined with full body, a la Kenyan AA, Ethiopian Supernatural or Tanzania Peaberry (had a Peet's version recently, incredible).

I'll share a recent discovery of mine, for arabica-drinkers. A company called Caffe d'Oro produces just one roast, sold in a 350g bag that costs about the same as most premium brand 250g bags by, eg, Hillkoff (one of my faves), Lanna, Doi Tung, Doi Chaang, etc. The first bag I bought only because it was less expensive and sold at a shop near where I work. It has since become my favorite daily bean because for my palate it's more balanced than other Thai arabicas I've tried so far. It even outdoes the Doi Chaang I've had, although I haven't tasted the local peaberry that earned 93 points on a coffeereview.com cupping.

Wait, the 5th cup is kicking in now. What the OP probably wants is what some call a 'city roast'. There are several local roasters in Chiang Mai that could probably accommodate a special request. Bangkok has a few as well. Try to find a 100% robusta variety, or a blend of robusta and arabica. One Thai coffee brand that is always 100% robusta is Khao Shong.

My ranking of Thai arabicas I've tried, in descending order of quality:

Caffe d'Oro (medium dark roast, ie french roast, only)

Hillkoff (all roasts, but esp the espresso)

Doi Chaang

Aroma (esp the french roast)

Doi Tung

BonCafe

Lanna

Wawee

Tops brand (fresh ground on demand helps)

Duang Dee

All cost 220-250 baht per 250 grams, except for d'Oro. 250 baht for 350 grams. I've seen 150g bags of d'Oro too, but don't recall the price.

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Too late, polecat! Nothing more (a)rousing than the smell of fresh coffee.

You see? I tried to warn you.

Hey dotcom, Yeah I keep a pack of Moccona Blue Mountain in stock for emergencies. Not a bad brew and certainly a good bargain. Otherwise, when I feel I can't justify paying for Lanna (I drink several cups of strong coffee a day, so it doesn't last long :o ) I go for Bon Cafe Morning Roast or a French or Vienna Aroma blend from the supermarket concessions.

(Confession: I keep my cheap-a$$ coffee in an expensive Lavazza tin to impress fridge raiders)

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Too late, polecat! Nothing more (a)rousing than the smell of fresh coffee.

You see? I tried to warn you.

Hey dotcom, Yeah I keep a pack of Moccona Blue Mountain in stock for emergencies. Not a bad brew and certainly a good bargain. Otherwise, when I feel I can't justify paying for Lanna (I drink several cups of strong coffee a day, so it doesn't last long :o ) I go for Bon Cafe Morning Roast or a French or Vienna Aroma blend from the supermarket concessions.

(Confession: I keep my cheap-a$$ coffee in an expensive Lavazza tin to impress fridge raiders)

My darling wife has me hooked on the 400 baht a pack Italian Brand, not Illy or lavazza but is dam_n good espresso. Think the name starts with an S.

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PS. Lanna Cafe for me, bought in Central Chidlom for 230b for 250g.

MOCCONA Blue Mountain - 90 baht per 250 grams. Widely available. Drink one pot every morning.

beanz, ground or instant?

Anyone seen the "d'Oro" or "Hillkoff" on Samui somewhere yet?

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Too late, polecat! Nothing more (a)rousing than the smell of fresh coffee.

You see? I tried to warn you.

Hey dotcom, Yeah I keep a pack of Moccona Blue Mountain in stock for emergencies. Not a bad brew and certainly a good bargain. Otherwise, when I feel I can't justify paying for Lanna (I drink several cups of strong coffee a day, so it doesn't last long :o ) I go for Bon Cafe Morning Roast or a French or Vienna Aroma blend from the supermarket concessions.

(Confession: I keep my cheap-a$$ coffee in an expensive Lavazza tin to impress fridge raiders)

Ha. At my office, where four beanheads including myself go through at least a half kilo of coffee a week, we've collectively tried Boncafe, Aroma, d'Oro and Lanna multiple times, and the only one we unanimously agree on is d'Oro. I can't find Hillkoff or Doi Chaang in Bangkok but with d'Oro nearly half the price of the others it's the easy choice--when you can find it. The only Lanna I like is the Premium but it tends to be rather bland, though the resealable pouches are cool. If Illy were affordable in Thailand that would be the one.

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Ha. At my office, where four beanheads including myself go through at least a half kilo of coffee a week, we've collectively tried Boncafe, Aroma, d'Oro and Lanna multiple times, and the only one we unanimously agree on is d'Oro. I can't find Hillkoff or Doi Chaang in Bangkok but with d'Oro nearly half the price of the others it's the easy choice--when you can find it. The only Lanna I like is the Premium but it tends to be rather bland, though the resealable pouches are cool. If Illy were affordable in Thailand that would be the one.

I can just see you all in your cardigans and Winnie the Pooh slippers debating the merits of d'Oro breakfast blend. No wonder no work ever gets done in Klong Toey.

Anyway, Doi Chaang? I though that was easy to find... oh, no hang on, I'm thinking of Doi Tung.

As you were.

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  • 1 month later...

Ok, after lots of walking and surfing, I found some great fresh roast coffee in Pattaya. If you go to Ben Jamit Bakery (it is on the dirt lot where the markets set up on Soi Buakaow on Tuesdays and Fridays) just walk along the shop fronts and you will see it, though it is hard to find on market days. These guys roast their own coffees and have blends and single origins available by the cup, whole bean (how I get it to take back to work) or ground. This is, easily, the best coffee I have had here so far.

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