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Recommendations For A Good Coffeemaker Please.


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Hello, I really miss a good cup of coffee each morning to start my day. I like just normal coffee, like that served in a good restaurant in the USA or UK. Starbucks is far too strong for me, and I haven't discovered a decent instant yet (except Folger's "Singles", not sold here in Thailand I don't think).

So I need a coffeemaker (or coffee pot) which you TVers have tried and like, and where to purchase it. I don't care if it is drip, perc, electric, grind, whatever - not important. Only important it produces a good cup of coffee. Very expensive is OK, having the good coffee regularly would be worth it! Also, what coffee (ground or beans, regular or decaf) produces a good flavorful cup of coffee in your experience?

Thanks for the suggestions. :o

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For brewed coffee I suggest a French press. Very simple to use and not expensive. No electricity involved except to boil the water separately. Just add the coffee, boiling water, stir it, and wait 5 minutes and press. If you like weaker, put in less coffee and/or find some mild beans. Any method is only as good as the coffee you use. Same grind can be used as for automatic drips (most canned coffees). For your desired style, any basic automatic drip would also work. No need to spend a lot of money to make a basic cup of good coffee. For better taste of course whole beans that you grind freshly yourself will be better. For canned coffee, S&W from the US is now available some places in Thailand in four varieties (in Pattaya at Friendship), and I find it quite good for canned coffee.

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Edited by Jingthing
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For brewed coffee I suggest a French press. Very simple to use and not expensive. No electricity involved except to boil the water separately. Just add the coffee, boiling water, stir it, and wait 5 minutes and press. If you like weaker, put in less coffee and/or find some mild beans. Any method is only as good as the coffee you use. Same grind can be used as for automatic drips (most canned coffees). For your desired style, any basic automatic drip would also work. No need to spend a lot of money to make a basic cup of good coffee. For better taste of course whole beans that you grind freshly yourself will be better. For canned coffee, S&W from the US is now available some places in Thailand in four varieties (in Pattaya at Friendship), and I find it quite good for canned coffee.

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Thanks JT for the suggestion. In all my adult life I have never tried a French press before and am really looking forward to it. I'll also try the S&W. I like the sound of the press because it doesn't boil and scald the devil out of the coffee for ten minutes like some makers do, something which I never understood to be of benefit. Also, it doesn't just pass the hot water though the coffee like a drip does. I'll assume the French had designed a winner here, and will pick one up tomorrow !! Thanks again.

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You can find a French Press many places (and I think ALL Starbucks carry them).

you have to grind the coffee ...

some people like them and others don't like the quality of the coffee you get from them because you have to steep the grounds in hot water (like tea leaves in hot tea) and this can increase the acidity of the coffee.

a French press if perfect for camping, or a small one for making individual cups of coffee is OK ... but the grounds are in the water too long for making it by the pot (plus it cools too fast). So if you go the french press route be sure to only use enough grounds and water for what you will be drinking immediately AND to pour it into a mug before it sits too long.

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SEB Thailand have coffeemakers of the following brands

KRUPS-SEB_ROWENTA

website

http://www.krups.com/Tools/Contact/Contact.htm

Braun and Moulinex are also available in Thailand.

And if you like to drink real coffee

ILLY (Italian) rather expensive

is regarded by connoisseurs as the best coffee in the world.

can find it in Carfour, Tops, Villa market, Foodland

Sorry to say but nowhere in Thailand you can a drink good cup of coffee. Same as first quality chocolate bars are impossible to find, my wifes suitcase has alsmost no clothes in but more than 10 kilo Belgian chocolate bars.

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SEB Thailand have coffeemakers of the following brands

KRUPS-SEB_ROWENTA

website

http://www.krups.com/Tools/Contact/Contact.htm

Braun and Moulinex are also available in Thailand.

And if you like to drink real coffee

ILLY (Italian) rather expensive

is regarded by connoisseurs as the best coffee in the world.

can find it in Carfour, Tops, Villa market, Foodland

Sorry to say but nowhere in Thailand you can a drink good cup of coffee. Same as first quality chocolate bars are impossible to find, my wifes suitcase has alsmost no clothes in but more than 10 kilo Belgian chocolate bars.

Wow, what a statement. I've had the best coffee anywhere in the world in Thailand. Sure Illy and the other Italian brands are good, but the sheer variety of coffees here are fantastic. Segafredo, Doi Teung and loads of individual little cafes using various blends are superb. The ice coffee is also special. Can't get enough of coffee in Thailand.

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As for coffee in Thailand, I like one made here called (my apologies for the spelling) cafe bo-lan. It is super black and mixed with sweet cream. However, it is not a daily drinker for me, as it is too much of a dessert coffee. It may be called Kopi coffee as well, from what I hear.

However, when it comes to an instant, & I think I have tried most all of them, I keep returning to Moccana Gold (though I will use one of its other flavours to mix things up). Short of a quality espresso, or taking the time to use the french press, I think it is certainly a decent alternative.

Cheers

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You can find a French Press many places (and I think ALL Starbucks carry them).

you have to grind the coffee ...

some people like them and others don't like the quality of the coffee you get from them because you have to steep the grounds in hot water (like tea leaves in hot tea) and this can increase the acidity of the coffee.

a French press if perfect for camping, or a small one for making individual cups of coffee is OK ... but the grounds are in the water too long for making it by the pot (plus it cools too fast). So if you go the french press route be sure to only use enough grounds and water for what you will be drinking immediately AND to pour it into a mug before it sits too long.

I found my French press maker at Robinsons, who had about a dozen varieties and prices. Great selection and even on sale yesterday. Your comments about using for small quantities only I think is correct. I bought a small one which makes only about one large cup but is perfect for me because my wife doesn't drink coffee and I am trying to hold down my intake to about a cup a day in the morning.

Today was my first cup with my new French press. First cup was too weak, I put only about 2 tsps of coffee in. Then I tried 6 tsps (heaping) which was much better, about the right strength for me. The brand I bought yesterday was the Tesco brand (Arabica), thinking I would try that first. The bag showed a French press as a suggested type of maker to use so I know at least I am using the right type of grounds. I almost bought a different type but at the last minute I noticed it said "Coffee powder" which made me change my mind, thinking it may be like instant. I think I'll try Tesco's "Morning" blend next.

I think the press was a good choice for me since I make only small amounts at at time. Many automatic makers seem designed to make more cups. Also, it seems logical to brew the coffee in hot water, then press out the grounds. Now to create my perfect cup of coffee I just need to experiment on coffee brands and types, temperature of the water [Tesco claims 94C is optimal and that boiling water does not make good coffee], and even different water brands. This will take a long time but at least it is straightforward and easy to gauge. I plan to buy a different brand often, trying various beans and grinding them too. Maybe discover a fancy brand of flavored coffee to have now and then as well, like hazelnut, vanilla, chocolate or something.

With all the free time I have on my hands here, I can test this issue to death. Sounds like fun. :o

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As for coffee in Thailand, I like one made here called (my apologies for the spelling) cafe bo-lan. It is super black and mixed with sweet cream. However, it is not a daily drinker for me, as it is too much of a dessert coffee. It may be called Kopi coffee as well, from what I hear.

However, when it comes to an instant, & I think I have tried most all of them, I keep returning to Moccana Gold (though I will use one of its other flavours to mix things up). Short of a quality espresso, or taking the time to use the french press, I think it is certainly a decent alternative.

Cheers

Called gafae boran กาแฟโบราณ, meaning ancient coffee. Available at most every other street corner in Bangkok early in the morning. Many small permanent shops sell it too. It's made by pouring boiling water over finely ground coffee in a small strainer. When made this way it is referred to as gafae thoong กาแฟถูง or "bag coffee". Gafae boran is served in a small glass rather than a cup and is both very sweet (from sugar and sweetened canned milk) and strong. More of something you drink for the caffeine and sugar kick rather than a good cup of coffee you sit back and enjoy slowly. It does go great with the fresh Chinese doughnuts called bpa tong go ปาท่องโก๋ though. You can buy the strainers in the coffee or kitchen gadget section of most supermarkets.

Edited by Groongthep
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Thanks for the tip about not using boiling water for French press. This link suggests letting the boiling water cool for just 30 seconds after boiling to reach the right temp.:

http://www.wikihow.com/Use-a-French-Press-or-Cafetiere

Another point which I think is true. French press does produce a rich, intensely flavored cup of coffee. For the OP who asked for mild, perhaps a good old automatic drip would be the best, and much closer to the typical traditionally weaker American style coffee.

As far as Viet restaurants, in my experience they use those metal contraptions where the coffee is pressed down and you pour the water OVER it, and the coffee drips through creating a thick brew similar to espresso (often mixed with condensed milk). That is not a French press. Most people would find that method TOO SLOW for everyday use at home.

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Edited by Jingthing
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You're right JT. After doing a little research on Google Images I can see that the metal strainer contraption used to make Vietnamese coffee is not the same as a French press.

Edited by Groongthep
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As far as Viet restaurants, in my experience they use those metal contraptions where the coffee is pressed down and you pour the water OVER it, and the coffee drips through creating a thick brew similar to espresso (often mixed with condensed milk). That is not a French press. Most people would find that method TOO SLOW for everyday use at home.

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These are dead handy to carry around and cheap too. (a glass cafetiere would break easily in transportation).

If the brew is too thick for you or too slow to make you just screw down the press lightly instead of tightly. The water will flow through quicker and produce a less viscous brew.

Edit: How did this get into Jobs, economy, banking, business, investment in Thailand forum???

Edited by PattayaParent
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Another point which I think is true. French press does produce a rich, intensely flavored cup of coffee.

No doubt. However, there's a negative point as well that's being overlooked. Studies suggest French press coffee seems less healthy:

"French press coffeepots, it may be time to switch to a filtered method. A randomized, crossover trial comparing unfiltered coffee against other beverages like water, tea, and hot chocolate showed elevated homocysteine levels in the coffee group. Homocysteine has been shown to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Unfiltered coffee also contains diterpenes, cholesterol-raising substances, which are removed when coffee is filtered."

--http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NHF/is_5_18/ai_86649633

Google around and you'll even find evidence of chloresterol level increases from drinking unfiltered coffee--though there's dissent as well and "need for further study." Of course this probably won't matter if your diet consists mainly of cheeseburgers anyway.

So, I recommend a better quality standard drip coffee machine. I'd get one of the better brands, like Braun, w/ its own filter basket so's you don't have to be buying paper filters. And you need to inquire whether you can buy additional filter baskets (might go ahead and get one) because they may break or wear out over time. For the cheap machines you typically can't replace the filter basket unless you're very lucky to find a generic somewhere (like, USA) that will fit. I have a Braun and it's great, well-built and worth the premium. Brews a lot faster than the cheap machine I used to have, too.

Edited by JSixpack
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SEB Thailand have coffeemakers of the following brands

Sorry to say but nowhere in Thailand you can a drink good cup of coffee. Same as first quality chocolate bars are impossible to find, my wifes suitcase has alsmost no clothes in but more than 10 kilo Belgian chocolate bars.

I hate to disagree buyt one of the best cups of coffee I have had for ages was at the Royal Project Fair in Chaingmai. I think it was Doi Chang Coffee but the beans are rather pricey. Of course for good coffee you must allways use the correct grind for your method and grind straight away.

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Isn't that a commercial espresso/milk foaming contraption? Espresso isn't better or worse than brewed coffee, just a different style. Personally, sometimes I like espresso, usually I prefer brewed.

As far as health benefits/dangers of coffee and different brewing methods, these tend to change constantly and continue to contradict each other. Color me skeptical.

Edited by Jingthing
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Any good dept store has a variety of coffee makers, from "French press" to regular drip machines, the prices are around 1000 baht.

Drip machine makes about three cups in one go, and you can of course put less coffee and less water, or more coffee and less water, if you want stronger coffee. Someone mentioned 6 tbsp in a French press for one cup, I think it's a waste.

Some drip machines have a plastic mesh as a filter, others need paper filters, available in any supermarket, usually between coffee and sugar sections. Usually it's Suzuki or Bon Cafe.

Any ground coffee will do just fine with these machines, and if you want your coffee freshly ground (from dedicated Suzuki/Aroma stands or Starbucks), just tell them you have "filter", not espresso.

It takes less than two minutes for full three cups, perfect.

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Any good dept store has a variety of coffee makers, from "French press" to regular drip machines, the prices are around 1000 baht.

Drip machine makes about three cups in one go, and you can of course put less coffee and less water, or more coffee and less water, if you want stronger coffee. Someone mentioned 6 tbsp in a French press for one cup, I think it's a waste.

Some drip machines have a plastic mesh as a filter, others need paper filters, available in any supermarket, usually between coffee and sugar sections. Usually it's Suzuki or Bon Cafe.

Any ground coffee will do just fine with these machines, and if you want your coffee freshly ground (from dedicated Suzuki/Aroma stands or Starbucks), just tell them you have "filter", not espresso.

It takes less than two minutes for full three cups, perfect.

I am a big fan of drip coffee. The acidity of french press if you let it steep at all too long is brutal! The issue with drip coffee is that people leave it on the burner far too long!

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anguid in psot #10 and Mighty Mouse in Post #20 hit the bulls eye... for my taste of drinking coffee.

and an "espresso machine" is not just good to make an espresso..

But hen there many opinions, Europ is the very best example of the variety, from Greek (Arab Style) boiled coffee powder in small little glasses, Italy with it's many varieties of coffee concoctions, all the way to Vienna and it's Coffeehouse Culture, to Germany and it's many "Cafe's" and the drip-drop Filter techniques and the many, many variety of Coffees...my favorite was from Dallmayr Delikatessen in Munich "Dallmayrs Prodomo", a wonderful rich tasting yet mild Coffee ....

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Another point which I think is true. French press does produce a rich, intensely flavored cup of coffee.

No doubt. However, there's a negative point as well that's being overlooked. Studies suggest French press coffee seems less healthy:

"French press coffeepots, it may be time to switch to a filtered method. A randomized, crossover trial comparing unfiltered coffee against other beverages like water, tea, and hot chocolate showed elevated homocysteine levels in the coffee group. Homocysteine has been shown to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Unfiltered coffee also contains diterpenes, cholesterol-raising substances, which are removed when coffee is filtered."

--http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NHF/is_5_18/ai_86649633

Google around and you'll even find evidence of chloresterol level increases from drinking unfiltered coffee--though there's dissent as well and "need for further study." Of course this probably won't matter if your diet consists mainly of cheeseburgers anyway.

So, I recommend a better quality standard drip coffee machine. I'd get one of the better brands, like Braun, w/ its own filter basket so's you don't have to be buying paper filters. And you need to inquire whether you can buy additional filter baskets (might go ahead and get one) because they may break or wear out over time. For the cheap machines you typically can't replace the filter basket unless you're very lucky to find a generic somewhere (like, USA) that will fit. I have a Braun and it's great, well-built and worth the premium. Brews a lot faster than the cheap machine I used to have, too.

If unfiltered brewing is a problem, the gold ones aren't much better than a French press. The French press is doing the same filtering as the gold ones, although with a longer contact time with the water.

It's the paper ones that are preventing oils and things from getting through.

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Isn't that a commercial espresso/milk foaming contraption? Espresso isn't better or worse than brewed coffee, just a different style. Personally, sometimes I like espresso, usually I prefer brewed.

It's a high end domestic machine. It isn't restricted to making espresso only. There is a milk frothing arm for those who prefer a flat white, a capuccino, latte etc.

If you really love good, well made coffee may I suggest that you take an interest in some of the coffee forums that are available on-line.

For example, there is Coffee Snobs and Coffee Geeks to get you started.

The Minore range of machines are high end. You can make an equally good cup of coffee with a much cheaper model. A French Press machine is just a small step above drinking instant coffee.

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It's the paper ones that are preventing oils and things from getting through.

Now I'm not sure if it's a good or bad thing. Oil is what gives the aroma.

I prefer paper filters simply for convenience - just take it out and throw it away, no need to mess with cleaning the the built-in filter for every cup.

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A French Press machine is just a small step above drinking instant coffee.

What a load of horse crap! Sure if you are selling 10,000 dollar coffee machines, you would say that.

From one of the very sites you suggested:

If you want some of the richest coffee you can get, a press pot can deliver. What may surprise most is that you can also get a relatively clean brew from it as well

http://www.coffeegeek.com/guides/presspot

Edited by Jingthing
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A French Press machine is just a small step above drinking instant coffee.

What a load of horse crap! Sure if you are selling 10,000 dollar coffee machines, you would say that.

From one of the very sites you suggested:

:D :D

If it's any consolation to you, I used to drink French Press coffee and enjoyed it. But then I moved up to a semi-automatic cappuccino maker and I haven't looked back.

These type machines cost in the vicinity of AU $1,000 but you also need to purchase a grinder. The quality of the grinder is considered more important than that of the coffee machine.

The photo of the coffee machine in my previous post on page one is my next purchase, should my cappuccino maker suddenly die on me. That machine costs approx. AU $2,500 with a quality grinder costing about AU $800.

Happy sipping. :o

Edited by Mighty Mouse
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