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Building a House on Samui, looking for suppliers of finishing materials


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I will be building a house later this year (maybe early 2022) in the southern part of Samui. I already have the land, the house concept (architectural drawings will be done in about a month). I have several builders that I have met and I know the one I want to use for the pool/terrace part of the project.  That is just additional background. I'm sure some of you have built houses on Samui and what I am interested in learning more about is suppliers that you have used (on or off island) for things like patio doors (I will need 6), windows (several types), furniture, floor and wall tiles, kitchens, roofing, bathroom fixtures, and lighting. I will be getting several quotes for the construction itself but likely I will purchase many of the finishing materials myself. I'm doing my own research but if you have any sources to suggest for any of the items above I would be grateful in learning about them. Importantly, my goal is mid-range quality/cost for most finishing materials and saving money where I can. 

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For double glazed sliding patio doors there is Sun Paradise in the square where the Irish Times pub is.

https://www.sunparadise.co.th

 

Also Fathaweeporn for sinks, toilets, bath, showers, tiles etc., and their sister shop in Maenam. Can't remember the name. Something like Home Depot.

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On 6/29/2021 at 2:23 PM, khunPer said:

I've been building a house on Samui, very successful construction.

 

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Buy as much as you can locally for better service and less problems, there can be an awful long distance to both mainland, and up to Bangkok area, if you run into problems.

 

The more you buy from the same place, the better discounts you can negotiate.

 

I used my building constructor to include all cement and blocks/bricks in the quote, but specified down to details which blocks/bricks I wanted where; i.e. in long term you save a lot by using aerated concrete blocks for aircon rooms, but they are more expensive to buy; whilst in non-aircon areas you can use the normal cheap blocks.

 

Ask for water proof cement mix, it costs only a few hundred baht extra per cubic meter delivered by truck, but eliminates cracks in posts and beams, and of course also floors. Also for plastering, use water proof addition, as you will get an nice even surface with no need for repairing cracks before painting, which crack repairs will often be visible later.

 

For roof I can recommend to check with Home Mart/SCG (Siam Cement Group) in Maenam (Fah Thaweeporn), their roof experts can make detailed computer drawings og you roof, with different quotation for various roof tiles. The Roof Center is a total enterprise with steel construction in galvanized steel, which protects you from rust and it's also a lighter construction, i.e. not so heavy and less costs for steel. They will install rooff tiles including all thinkable water protection – when you realize how much there is to do for obtaining a water tight roof, you will not let Cambodian or Myanmar farmers do that job as migrant building workers, you'll leave it for educated experts – and they also install heat insulation by reflective foil under the roof tiles. At the end you get a five years warranty, and Cement Thai is probably still here five years later, whilst you don't know if you can find your building constructor when your roof leaks. The best thing for me was that SCG's total roof-entreprise was cheaper than having the roof construction included in the main construction entreprise.

 

wDSC05621_roof-tiles.jpg.b3ec26d9a19b234bacf8f93ced971fb7.jpg

SCG's Roof Expert on work...

I bought tiles and wet room equipment from both Decor, as branch of Fah Thaweeporn, the Home Mart owner, and from Home Pro. I negotiated with both places, some of the products were equal, for example Cotto tiles, so I could check prices and have an impression of how much I could squeeze, price were little different. Home Pro offers installation service of hardware, and it might be cheaper to have Homo Pro's team installing a toilet than using the building constructor's plumber.

 

I installed a water tank under the roof, so I have running tap water in case of power black outs, they are however less common now than 10 years ago, but I'm never stuck in the shower niche all soaped in, and suddently no more water in tap, because no electric, no water pressure pump. I also made solar hot water system on the roof, which in the sunny periods gives plenty of hot water, but I also have small instant electric water heaters for showers and kitchen, for the not so sunny periods.

 

wDSC06318_solar-heater_w800.jpg.53302472faff30eff41c73722785a1b5.jpg

 

All my electric stuff I bought from Home Pro and from Suport Electric placed on the Ring Road between Maenam and Bo Phut. You need to check both places, they are both well equipped and good, but Suport has a better variety of stuff from Philips, which is a good reliable brand.

 

I generally used my Thai girlfriend to do the talking in Thai, some don't understand enough English, and I've educated her in negotiating price when she stayed in Europe, she was actually becoming excellent and always went straight to talk to "someone important". Especially Home Pro you can negotiate, but the often need to talk to head office, or the supplier, as they also might offer discounts. We for example bought 7 Mitsubishi inverter-aircons and she wished a discount; Mitsubishi offered 4 remote controlled smart floor fans as discount, but we wouldn't need floor fans when buying aircons, money was what what we wanted. It took some patience and several phone calls before we got an acceptable discount, plus free installation – plus 4 remote controlled smart floor fans; there was no way to avoid them, probably overstock that they were happy to get rid off...😀

 

Don't save on wooden doors, buy hard wood, even thaat they cost more, you won't regret it later; but you might cry later over having instead chosen cheap soft wooden doors that bends and won't close. But in general avoid as much wood as possible, unless you can afford real hard wood, otherwise you might feed a huge termite colony moving into your new house. If it's not positioned for a close look, you can use fiber-cement as wood substitute, especially if you do a good primer and paint job; unfortunately you will not gain point by the termites when doing that.

 

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The wooden-look ceilings and roof edges are all made in fiber-cement boards and planks. My railings are wood, but you can make them equally nice in fiber cement planks and posts.

 

When doing the foundation, which is often post's feets up to zero level (ground level), you should consider to have pipes installed for gassing all the inhabitant you might not notice under your ground level floors. It costs you in the area of 5,000 to 10,000 baht, but might be much cheaper than a permanent termite colony, or whatever that might considers to move in down there.

 

wDSC02681_pesticide-gas-tubes(800w).jpg.06cc2b947d6bea57eea775c3ab75f2ca.jpg

Pesticide gas pipes installed in the foundation.

 

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Gas pipe ending with a cap for pesticide gas, which might be needed once every fifth year or less.

 

Climate is hard and Samui is close to sea and salt, so consider either aluminum doors and windows, eventual uPVC. If you choose aluminum use a local workshop to do all. When buying uPVC, there are two makers to my knowledge, choose the one with a local work team (Home Mart/SCG), there is a long distance up to the Bangkok area, whenever you need service, or something don't fit.

 

For furniture avoid chipboard with vinyl as much as possible, it wont last, buy real hard wood instead. You can buy nice European style kitchens from specialist shops, or from Home Pro's kitchen department. I used Home Pro as total entreprise for full European style kitchen, including installation; they'll make nice computer drawings and animation of you future kitchen. However, if you consider thai food as part of the kitchen jobs, seriously consider two kitchens with a separate semi-outdoor Thai kitchen, you won't regret it, but you might regret having Thai food cooked in your fine European style kitchen...😉

 

image.png.10db54efddea3f5a7757c7497b6151a4.png

 

You can buy paint from Home Mart or Home Pro, or other building material markets with paint department. I chose Home Pro and TOA paint, mainly because TOA-paint was used to paint the by that time tallest tower in Bangkok, Bayoke Sky Hotel, and I presumed they didn't wanted to repaint 300 meter straight up in the sky every third year. TOA claims that their Super Shield paint lasts for 10 years, so that became my choice, even it was little more expensive. I took out a few workers and taught them how to paint, and especially cover all areas that should not be splashed over with paint, and to use cover tape (Japanese Lion brand is the best). I insisted on two layers of TOA primer, which work is very important, if not done right, all later paint will easily come off. Nothing plastered would be painted before after at least one month's maturing, preferable three month. I separated each layer of paint with 24 hours. On top of the two layers of primer, there came three layers of finishing paint. 11 years later the paint on my house still looks perfect, my neighbors that build their houses during the same period as I, their paintjobs began to look awful in some spots already after 1-2 years, but they used only one layer primer, and a cheaper paint for two top coats.

 

In general, think of maintenance, the workers will deliver a nice make-up house, but things will begin to need maintenance after some 5-10 years, and that's your problem; it's you that for example are going to deal with the blocked sewer pipes, so make sure there are accessable points you can open and flush them, or mechanically clean them, instead of banging a cement deck up...🤨

 

I can recommend you to buy the book "How to Buy Land and Build a House in Thailand" by Philip Bryce (Paiboon Publishing, ISBN 1-887521-71-2), you might find it just as helpful as I did; the author actually describes his building of a house on Koh Phangan.

🙂

Excellent information and ideas. Thank you. And yes, we will have a separate outside "Issan kitchen" for the spiciest of meals. 🙂

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21 minutes ago, crazykopite said:

Get the contractor to do the basic construction in other words the building shell then you bring in your own kitchen fitters ( Rudi ) and reputable window companies most of my materials came from Bangkok an example I could use is I purchased all my air con units from Lazada COD saved around 50,000 baht on Samui quotes I was given but if you go down that route it’s very trying but I was on site everyday as I had many issues with the construction company so much so I swallowed the bullet and parted company with them half way through the build . All my glass panels came from Bangkok 30 in total each weighing 84 kg I only suggest you do this if you have the energy and can be onsite every day I reckon I saved at least a million baht but it took its toll but hey I’ve just turned 70 so I’m no spring chicken it took me a good year before I could move in and then two years to get it as I wanted and I still haven’t finished but Rome wasn’t built in a day 

EECB6709-DD21-4D9B-BB71-7FDA8CC96CD6.jpeg

 

I will be staying across the soi from the house build and will be on-site almost everyday to ensure the plans are followed and no shortcuts on quality. Also, I can make on-the-fly change decisions. I suppose I will act as a general contractor although I may solicit someone more knowledgeable about all stages of the build.

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On 6/29/2021 at 12:55 PM, Tropicalevo said:

Do a major shop in Bangkok and truck it all down. That will definitely be cheaper. That is what most of the builders do.

Just make sure that the items that you buy can be maintained on the island otherwise waiting for techies from Bangkok takes a while.

The builder that you choose could probably help you with this.

 

Alternatively, there is a new Bangkok building supplies warehouse being built on the island. One of the cheapest (so a builder friend told me). It is going to be a big one - currently under construction.

It is called Global House and is located between Maenam and Bang Po. There is a web site.

Yes...this seems a decision I must navigate...buy local or Bangkok, pluses and minuses. Maybe Global House will provide an acceptable in-between option.

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If you don't want to go through the long, complicated sourcing, arranging the buying of and shipping of all these materials call Khun At at Botanica on Phuket and he'll get you beautiful, superb materials at a reasonable prices. He's a wonderful architect and a superb developper with a top-notch crew of builders.

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3 hours ago, Silencer said:

I will be staying across the soi from the house build and will be on-site almost everyday to ensure the plans are followed and no shortcuts on quality. Also, I can make on-the-fly change decisions. I suppose I will act as a general contractor although I may solicit someone more knowledgeable about all stages of the build.

Be careful with on-the-fly changes if you have a fixed quote, then can any changes be considered being beyond what's agreed and become very expensive (recoving any price and profit cuts made to come up with a low quote), or being cause for unnecessary quarrel. In some cases it might be cheaper to just construct what's specified in initial drawings and included in the quote, and then later get a separate quote for changes.

 

I made very detailed preparations for a basic cement construction offer, i.e. digging, foundation, posts, beams, basic plumbing, bricks up to roof level, door frames for wooden doors (as wooden doors were mounted Thai way), plastering, and surrounding concrete jobs. That costs for the basics (including the separate roof-job) were about half of the total.

 

I made sperate contracs for electrics, roof construction, carpenters, hardware installations, tile work, and gypsum ceilings; whilst I "borrowed" a selected couple of my basic constructor's workers for paint job (he used to have two constructions going at the same time, but had only one contract after finishing my house, so he was happy that I  "employsed" and paid a couple of his workers for a period, it was during the 2009-2010 financial downturn). Materials and labor for finishing was around the other half of the total building costs.

 

It's really good to be on site every day - I did that - but make sure that you agree very detailed with both the main building constructor, and the sub-contractors, what you expect, and expect as much as possible the Thai-way-of-doing-it, if something else is not specifically detailed agreed beforehand; interfering with the way Thais' do their work, should be done very carefully.

 

The most important person in the construction team is the foreman. Make agreement in advance with his boos, the building constructor, if you can give instructions directly to the foreman, i.e. you could be acting like kind of project manager, or the dialogue need to be done through the constructor; it could have something to do with "face". Even the building constructor might be dependent of the foreman's experience and ask for his advice.

 

I had a very successful construction of my house. A small thing that might be part of it was – apart the master's interest in the worker's work – that I one every month invited all the site's workers (including spouses and children) for dinner, agreed in advance with the building constructor. It was typical Thai style 129 baht (or so) eat-as-much-as-you-can hot pan BBQ buffet, and starting early enough so workers from camps could be safe back in due time (some migrant workers need to be back in camp no later than 9 pm). That relative affordable expense, relative compared to the costs of building a house, made the workers enjoy to work for the house master, and they probably put little more hearth into it; many of workers and sub-contractors dropped by later to check that my girlfriend and I was still happy in the house, and that the roof was not leaking...😉

 

And the roof is still not leaking...👍

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See if there is a Thai Watsuda in the area much bigger than Home Pro or Home Mart especially if you need wood products. I go there once a week just to walk around and get ideas and check out prices plus to keep out of the hot weather.  When it comes to double glaze window good but no point unless you insulate the roof.

 

When it comes to stuff like bricks, sand and cement I would buy close by your project look around sorry I don't know your area but good luck!

 

 

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16 hours ago, khunPer said:

Be careful with on-the-fly changes if you have a fixed quote, then can any changes be considered being beyond what's agreed and become very expensive (recoving any price and profit cuts made to come up with a low quote), or being cause for unnecessary quarrel. In some cases it might be cheaper to just construct what's specified in initial drawings and included in the quote, and then later get a separate quote for changes.

 

I made very detailed preparations for a basic cement construction offer, i.e. digging, foundation, posts, beams, basic plumbing, bricks up to roof level, door frames for wooden doors (as wooden doors were mounted Thai way), plastering, and surrounding concrete jobs. That costs for the basics (including the separate roof-job) were about half of the total.

 

I made sperate contracs for electrics, roof construction, carpenters, hardware installations, tile work, and gypsum ceilings; whilst I "borrowed" a selected couple of my basic constructor's workers for paint job (he used to have two constructions going at the same time, but had only one contract after finishing my house, so he was happy that I  "employsed" and paid a couple of his workers for a period, it was during the 2009-2010 financial downturn). Materials and labor for finishing was around the other half of the total building costs.

 

It's really good to be on site every day - I did that - but make sure that you agree very detailed with both the main building constructor, and the sub-contractors, what you expect, and expect as much as possible the Thai-way-of-doing-it, if something else is not specifically detailed agreed beforehand; interfering with the way Thais' do their work, should be done very carefully.

 

The most important person in the construction team is the foreman. Make agreement in advance with his boos, the building constructor, if you can give instructions directly to the foreman, i.e. you could be acting like kind of project manager, or the dialogue need to be done through the constructor; it could have something to do with "face". Even the building constructor might be dependent of the foreman's experience and ask for his advice.

 

I had a very successful construction of my house. A small thing that might be part of it was – apart the master's interest in the worker's work – that I one every month invited all the site's workers (including spouses and children) for dinner, agreed in advance with the building constructor. It was typical Thai style 129 baht (or so) eat-as-much-as-you-can hot pan BBQ buffet, and starting early enough so workers from camps could be safe back in due time (some migrant workers need to be back in camp no later than 9 pm). That relative affordable expense, relative compared to the costs of building a house, made the workers enjoy to work for the house master, and they probably put little more hearth into it; many of workers and sub-contractors dropped by later to check that my girlfriend and I was still happy in the house, and that the roof was not leaking...😉

 

And the roof is still not leaking...👍

Nice personal touch and story.  I don't plan on making many on-the-fly changes but if something works out better being a few centimeters longer, higher/lower than planned, or shifted right/left, we can proceed as necessary. Thinking something like a built in concrete shelf/height of sink ledge/width of something, easily adjusted.

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On 7/1/2021 at 1:56 PM, Silencer said:

Nice personal touch and story.  I don't plan on making many on-the-fly changes but if something works out better being a few centimeters longer, higher/lower than planned, or shifted right/left, we can proceed as necessary. Thinking something like a built in concrete shelf/height of sink ledge/width of something, easily adjusted.

Some small changes and re-thinking and -reapproaching is all part and parcel of any build.

I agree with doing one's best not to make too many and certainly try hard to avoid large changes. With painstaking observations and planning most problems can be avoided.

A great way to work out such things as electrical outlet types and placement as one example is to view, photograph and measure types and placement of same in already built homes.

I know that Thais build kitchens in block and bricks rendered. Personally I loathe them as they don't allow for variations of many kinds in size and function due to the restricted dimensions as defined by materials used. and the dimensions of these materials waste a huge amount of usable-space on the kitchen.

I had all my kitchen cupboards made from waterproof plywood then laminated (benchtops of stone).

No problem with humidity and moisture uptake in this material as with composite boards like MDF or other particle type boarding.  Also woodworm and termite-proof.

This allows for wider cupboard openings with no 'return' at the opening as in a brick or block structures. Also makes for easy install of all fitments and pull-out features internally.  

I'd advise you visit spec homes, contact developers who build places you like the look of and view them. As for HomePro it's got some good stuff, but a lot of cheap spec junk too so watch out. Beware of chinese made products - they can be of very poor quality, and in the case of porcelains and tiling take up stains and bleed.

The pre-build planning, and crystal clarity on design and plans before any sod is turned is crucial ... AND that the builders follow and understand every single aspect of the plans (and the relationship between each), and that you watch every step like a hawk is my advice (take it from an old builder like myself).

If you have not built before and aren't savvy with the intricacies of same I'd strongly recommend you get a licensed European or Australian builder, engineer, civil engineer, surveyor or someone of such qualifications to oversee and sign off on all aspects of the build as a contracted specialist. Of course thIs will cost you but it's well worth it for the peace of mind and avoiding shocking mistakes that sadly are often built into Thai builder's ways of doing things and seen as 'normal' in Thailand.

My experience has been a relatively easy one as the developer and architect at Botanica in Phuket, Khun At, has a impressive European experience in architectural training apart from his Thai degree and he builds with a European/Western design in dimensional relationships, aesthetics, and certainly quality (he uses only the best materials and fitments).

I guess because I spent 6 months sourcing almost every switch type and style, tap, etc to exact specifics, then checking with Khun At and the builder made things very easy. 

I made a specific thing of taking some western developers out for a meal or coffee and to borrow from some of their vast experience before I decided on Khun At's company to do the build which educated me on a whole lot of things thats aved headaches.

  • Slab concrete must have waterproofing agents in their mixes, and laid on builders plastic/membrane as standard which sadly many Thai builders don't even think of and which later will see the house with damp problems if missed. (Yes I know it's not Code in Thailand but to act as a moisture/vapour barrier is essential, it also slows the cure of the slab and ensures a stronger structural cure - something which in a climate like Thailand is needed.
  • Western spec damp-coursing in all your ground-floor walls.
  • 100mm downpipes as standard
  • 100mm or wider guttering throughout
  • large diameter under-sink piping - 50mm minimum
  • drainage as straight through as possible (with silt-traps, flow rate-adjusting pits of course) - Thai plumbers don't seem to have much of a clue about this and as such your drains may not draught properly, stale water and sewerage stench may occur, - watch the shower pan/s install carefully!
  • If your building your roof in steel make sure all metal is either galvanised, and if not, then every cm be treated with a rust converter then spray painted thoroughly with a rust-proof primer then top coats. * Don't allow welds to be left untreated!
  • Watch carefully and insist upon Aussie or Euro spec S-bends waste-water outlets.
  • Despite the trend in Thai construction to shy away from wood and use plastic and metal everywhere - if the right species of timbers, and treated well then there's no need to fear termites, other wood borers and fungal rot.
  • Watch the electrical fitout! I insisted upon a full Aussie spec wiring system throughout so electrocution, overloading, brownouts, damaging appliances etc is nigh on impossible.
  • Get Alexa installed in the home - it's a great thing.
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On 7/4/2021 at 11:13 AM, Tropposurfer said:

Some small changes and re-thinking and -reapproaching is all part and parcel of any build.

I agree with doing one's best not to make too many and certainly try hard to avoid large changes. With painstaking observations and planning most problems can be avoided.

A great way to work out such things as electrical outlet types and placement as one example is to view, photograph and measure types and placement of same in already built homes.

I know that Thais build kitchens in block and bricks rendered. Personally I loathe them as they don't allow for variations of many kinds in size and function due to the restricted dimensions as defined by materials used. and the dimensions of these materials waste a huge amount of usable-space on the kitchen.

I had all my kitchen cupboards made from waterproof plywood then laminated (benchtops of stone).

No problem with humidity and moisture uptake in this material as with composite boards like MDF or other particle type boarding.  Also woodworm and termite-proof.

This allows for wider cupboard openings with no 'return' at the opening as in a brick or block structures. Also makes for easy install of all fitments and pull-out features internally.  

I'd advise you visit spec homes, contact developers who build places you like the look of and view them. As for HomePro it's got some good stuff, but a lot of cheap spec junk too so watch out. Beware of chinese made products - they can be of very poor quality, and in the case of porcelains and tiling take up stains and bleed.

The pre-build planning, and crystal clarity on design and plans before any sod is turned is crucial ... AND that the builders follow and understand every single aspect of the plans (and the relationship between each), and that you watch every step like a hawk is my advice (take it from an old builder like myself).

If you have not built before and aren't savvy with the intricacies of same I'd strongly recommend you get a licensed European or Australian builder, engineer, civil engineer, surveyor or someone of such qualifications to oversee and sign off on all aspects of the build as a contracted specialist. Of course thIs will cost you but it's well worth it for the peace of mind and avoiding shocking mistakes that sadly are often built into Thai builder's ways of doing things and seen as 'normal' in Thailand.

My experience has been a relatively easy one as the developer and architect at Botanica in Phuket, Khun At, has a impressive European experience in architectural training apart from his Thai degree and he builds with a European/Western design in dimensional relationships, aesthetics, and certainly quality (he uses only the best materials and fitments).

I guess because I spent 6 months sourcing almost every switch type and style, tap, etc to exact specifics, then checking with Khun At and the builder made things very easy. 

I made a specific thing of taking some western developers out for a meal or coffee and to borrow from some of their vast experience before I decided on Khun At's company to do the build which educated me on a whole lot of things thats aved headaches.

  • Slab concrete must have waterproofing agents in their mixes, and laid on builders plastic/membrane as standard which sadly many Thai builders don't even think of and which later will see the house with damp problems if missed. (Yes I know it's not Code in Thailand but to act as a moisture/vapour barrier is essential, it also slows the cure of the slab and ensures a stronger structural cure - something which in a climate like Thailand is needed.
  • Western spec damp-coursing in all your ground-floor walls.
  • 100mm downpipes as standard
  • 100mm or wider guttering throughout
  • large diameter under-sink piping - 50mm minimum
  • drainage as straight through as possible (with silt-traps, flow rate-adjusting pits of course) - Thai plumbers don't seem to have much of a clue about this and as such your drains may not draught properly, stale water and sewerage stench may occur, - watch the shower pan/s install carefully!
  • If your building your roof in steel make sure all metal is either galvanised, and if not, then every cm be treated with a rust converter then spray painted thoroughly with a rust-proof primer then top coats. * Don't allow welds to be left untreated!
  • Watch carefully and insist upon Aussie or Euro spec S-bends waste-water outlets.
  • Despite the trend in Thai construction to shy away from wood and use plastic and metal everywhere - if the right species of timbers, and treated well then there's no need to fear termites, other wood borers and fungal rot.
  • Watch the electrical fitout! I insisted upon a full Aussie spec wiring system throughout so electrocution, overloading, brownouts, damaging appliances etc is nigh on impossible.
  • Get Alexa installed in the home - it's a great thing.

Great tips...thank you.

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Khun Per, to get a ballpark idea, what would you say the price per sqm for land, and the price per sqm of building (labour incl materials) came to after you finished the house?

 

Thank you.

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2 minutes ago, Tanomazu said:

Khun Per, to get a ballpark idea, what would you say the price per sqm for land, and the price per sqm of building (labour incl materials) came to after you finished the house?

 

Thank you.

My house is 300 square meters living area, not included open terrasses. Total construction price all included was 26,600 baht per square meter when it was finished in 2010. Today you should more likely count around 31,500 baht per square meter for something similar, as minimum labor salaries raised from 220 baht per day to about 325 baht per day now, and Thailand's consumer price index is up with 17-18 percent from 2010 till now.

 

But total square meter price is very dependent of choice of materials. You can find some nice looking stuff for an affordable price, or you can buy real sandstone or marble floor tiles, or make teak wood floors, for a minor fortune. I've put floor tiles all together indoor/outdoor on some 500 square meters, just think of the difference between 300 baht a square meter and 3,000 baht a square meter.

 

In my view you can still build something nice from around 20,000 baht per square meter.

 

My land price in 2004 was 20,000 baht per square meter; today more likely 45,000 baht per square meter. But that is due to location, it might be difficult to find land similar my location, and any asking price might not mirror a real price. My next door neighbor for example, wish to sell a smaller plot than mine with a 2-bed house, and since I know the price of their house construction, and that their land is 60 percent the size of mine, the asking price would equal a land price increase for my land of 600 percent, which is unrealistic. Remember, that houses in Thailand after a few years begins in general to decrease in value, it's the land under the house that has value. My neighbor sold his almost 9-year old house 2 years ago, and as I know both their initial construction budget and land size, and also what they paid for the land, the land value alone was little more than 46,000 baht a square meter, if the house kept it's initial construction value. Total asking price was 38 percent higher than actual sales price, or the buyer got a 27.5 percent discount.

 

You can find land on Samui from about 3 million baht, perhaps even little less, but very dependent of location, and of course the size of the land plot. Normally measured in rai, i.e. 1 rai equals 1,600 square meters, where a normal villa plot would be about half a rai, or in the area of 800 square meters, so about 3.750 baht per square meter for land is within reach, if you count 3 million baht for 800 square meters. Larger plots are still (before Covid) typically priced from 3.5 million baht per rai with public road access and electricity by the road, but that kind of land plots are typically several rai in size. Prime locations cost more, sometimes a lot more. A prime location for a Thai would for example be by the trafficked Ring Road, good for business and therefore a high price, whilst a prime location for a foreigner rather is a remote area, and preferable with a view.

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What a superb answer, thank you so much. So for 14 million Baht you can get a 2800 sq m, 280ms interior house?

 

That's incredibly good value.

 

May I ask how long the building process took in your case?

 

 

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1 hour ago, Tanomazu said:

What a superb answer, thank you so much. So for 14 million Baht you can get a 2800 sq m, 280ms interior house?

 

That's incredibly good value.

 

May I ask how long the building process took in your case?

Not really; for about 14 million baht I got 270 square meter land for little more than 20,000 baht for each square meter in 2004, and 300 square meter house for little more than 26,600 baht per square meter in 2010.

 

I bought the land in 2004, spending some time with planning and drawing, and upgrading land title deed to full freehold, i.e. Chanote title, which took quite some time, then clear permission with Marine Department for the future beachfront erosion protection wall, and finally started building construction in February 2009 on the day predicted by monks as a lucky day (very important). Began the house build with the post that monks had predicted as the "lucky post" (as important as the day), and of course attending the ceremony for the spirits already inhabiting the land, and placed some little gold under the "lucky post", and poured the first bucket of cement in. It was indeed the right choice of post, as I had double-checked it. I borrowed a pendulum from the clairvoyant French lady living next door, and tried myself to find a lucky post (I'm quite good with a pendulum, but I'm not superstitious, just curious), and I found exactly the same post as the monks had predicted to the building constructor, but of course I didn't know which post the monks had chosen by that time...😀(Grinning Face-emoji)

 

wDSC02323_Collage_cement-lucky-post(800w).jpg.d8bd3b1d381d1bc345a7357a333f81a1.jpg

Lucky post is placed, gold and cement put in, gifts for the Spirits Of The Land, one of ghosts seemed to have ordered a cigar.

 

The construction's finishing details were almost done by mid August 2010, but I had to sleep in the house on the day that monks predicted was the lucky day to move in (extremely important), so little more work to be done after moving in, but all done by beginning of September, So in total almost 20 month, but I was in no rush, I paid the last workers per day and gave a bonus on top for working slow, so there was time to care for details.

 

By following local customs, I had a very lucky building project. and no major problems neither during construction, nor later, so far.

 

Good luck and spirits means a lot to Thais, and also that the future owner is part of the ceremonies, and it doesn't matter what one believes in, it's a great experience to be part of it...🙂(Slightly Smiling Face-emoji)

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That all sounds like you went by the book there. Good to hear it turned out well without major issues.

 

Just to clarify, you would have got more than 270 sq me of land if you built a 300 sq m house presumably?

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2 hours ago, Tanomazu said:

That all sounds like you went by the book there. Good to hear it turned out well without major issues.

 

Just to clarify, you would have got more than 270 sq me of land if you built a 300 sq m house presumably?

Maybe he built on the beach?  🤭whistling emoji!

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2 hours ago, Tanomazu said:

That all sounds like you went by the book there. Good to hear it turned out well without major issues.

 

Just to clarify, you would have got more than 270 sq me of land if you built a 300 sq m house presumably?

300 square meter living area, and that's possible if you build more than one floor, my ground floor is for example 120 square meters.

 

The building regulations on Samui are depending on which zone you're building in. Beachfront land is in general very restricted by size of building (about 70 square meter ground plan); one floor only; total height of 6 meters; roof style and roof tile color; distance from beach (10 meters); distance to next building, and no connection or coverage path between the buildings. There might be exceptions for certain larger resorts' beach front rstaurants, and also for older constructions, from before the newer zone regulations.

 

But some beach areas are so-called "town-zone" (village zone), where you need to be 2 meters inside own land, and 3 meter from water; ½ to 1 meter from neighbor, depending on openings (windows/doors), or agreement with neighbor; and 12 meter in height. There is a maximum ground level square meter restriction, I cannot remember correct size by heart. That's why you see some larger beachfront houses on quite attractive beachfront plots.

1f642.png

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1 minute ago, Tropicalevo said:

Maybe he built on the beach?  🤭whistling emoji!

That's exactly what I did...👍(Thumbs Up Sign)

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2 hours ago, khunPer said:

300 square meter living area, and that's possible if you build more than one floor, my ground floor is for example 120 square meters.

 

The building regulations on Samui are depending on which zone you're building in. Beachfront land is in general very restricted by size of building (about 70 square meter ground plan); one floor only; total height of 6 meters; roof style and roof tile color; distance from beach (10 meters); distance to next building, and no connection or coverage path between the buildings. There might be exceptions for certain larger resorts' beach front rstaurants, and also for older constructions, from before the newer zone regulations.

 

But some beach areas are so-called "town-zone" (village zone), where you need to be 2 meters inside own land, and 3 meter from water; ½ to 1 meter from neighbor, depending on openings (windows/doors), or agreement with neighbor; and 12 meter in height. There is a maximum ground level square meter restriction, I cannot remember correct size by heart. That's why you see some larger beachfront houses on quite attractive beachfront plots.

1f642.png

Of course, thanks, that makes sense.

 

In terms of living at the beach, do you  find that there is more wind, smells or any other disadvantages? I ask because I am weighing up inland with more land, vs beach where obviously you have the advantage of walks on the beach etc.

 

I take it with Koh Samui there is no risk of tsunamis, earthquakes and the like?

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2 hours ago, Tanomazu said:

Of course, thanks, that makes sense.

 

In terms of living at the beach, do you  find that there is more wind, smells or any other disadvantages? I ask because I am weighing up inland with more land, vs beach where obviously you have the advantage of walks on the beach etc.

 

I take it with Koh Samui there is no risk of tsunamis, earthquakes and the like?

Tsunami and earthquake risks are statistically very low - part of my choice - but we never know with the by science presumed supervolcano under Indonesia.

 

Very crowded beaches would probably be out of reach financially for most not relative wealthy folks, whilst the less crowded areas actually seems to be pretty quiet, especially in evenings and early morning.

 

Of major disadvantages are the few weeks with annual monsoon storms, which some years are not much, and other years can provide both high waves, hard wind, and lots of downpour. Furthermore there is the sea salt, everything made with iron and steel rusts fast, even if it's so-called stainless steel, and many non iron metals corrodes. I've noticed a huge difference between the beachfront side and the leeward land side.

 

Of major advantages is the fresh air, and the especially view and feeling; but it's a question of individual lifestyle and personal preferences. There might also be (little) less insects, it's only a few evenings a year I cannot sit outside due to insects, which are after downpour when the termites fly; however it lasts only a few hours, but unfortunately around candlelight-dinner-time.

 

Before choosing a beach remember to check it both in hot season, rainy season and monsoon; furthermore both during low tide and high tide. I almost signed a deal for a several rai big beachfront plot down south, until I checked it one afternoon at low tide, and realized that this was not what I dreamed about. Disappointed I drove back up north where I stayed in a rented bungalow, and realized that beach right there was it. It was last evening before my return to Europe and I had dinner with my girlfriend in a beach restaurant. Thais talks much, so she mentioned to the manager that we had been looking for a beachfront plot, and he said that a restaurant 100 meters from here was for sale. I knew that place, I had had my dinner there before a few years ago, but now it had closed. Don't think too much, meanwhile it might be gone. Within the next three hours I had decided to buy, which was easy, meet the owner, made a sales agreement in front of the head-of-village as witness, cashed out a 100,000 baht deposit from an ATM, promised to transfer another million baht within short time, and off to the airport. If it was pure luck, something divine, or plain coincidence, I don't know, but I don't regret it.

 

The beach I live on is quite private, even during normal high season. In a travel magazine poll it was voted as number 9 of "Asia's Top 10 Beaches", there were only one other Thai beach on the list, and that was primary due to the feeling of privacy. Often little late in evenings, like after 9 pm or 9:30 pm, there are nobody, and I mean "nobody but me" on the beach.

 

I take a nice walk on the beach every afternoon, with or without dogs - a pair inhabits the house, and some neighboring dogs often follows - an early morning walk is also a possibility, if not both.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, khunPer said:

Tsunami and earthquake risks are statistically very low - part of my choice - but we never know with the by science presumed supervolcano under Indonesia.

 

Very crowded beaches would probably be out of reach financially for most not relative wealthy folks, whilst the less crowded areas actually seems to be pretty quiet, especially in evenings and early morning.

 

Of major disadvantages are the few weeks with annual monsoon storms, which some years are not much, and other years can provide both high waves, hard wind, and lots of downpour. Furthermore there is the sea salt, everything made with iron and steel rusts fast, even if it's so-called stainless steel, and many non iron metals corrodes. I've noticed a huge difference between the beachfront side and the leeward land side.

 

Of major advantages is the fresh air, and the especially view and feeling; but it's a question of individual lifestyle and personal preferences. There might also be (little) less insects, it's only a few evenings a year I cannot sit outside due to insects, which are after downpour when the termites fly; however it lasts only a few hours, but unfortunately around candlelight-dinner-time.

 

Before choosing a beach remember to check it both in hot season, rainy season and monsoon; furthermore both during low tide and high tide. I almost signed a deal for a several rai big beachfront plot down south, until I checked it one afternoon at low tide, and realized that this was not what I dreamed about. Disappointed I drove back up north where I stayed in a rented bungalow, and realized that beach right there was it. It was last evening before my return to Europe and I had dinner with my girlfriend in a beach restaurant. Thais talks much, so she mentioned to the manager that we had been looking for a beachfront plot, and he said that a restaurant 100 meters from here was for sale. I knew that place, I had had my dinner there before a few years ago, but now it had closed. Don't think too much, meanwhile it might be gone. Within the next three hours I had decided to buy, which was easy, meet the owner, made a sales agreement in front of the head-of-village as witness, cashed out a 100,000 baht deposit from an ATM, promised to transfer another million baht within short time, and off to the airport. If it was pure luck, something divine, or plain coincidence, I don't know, but I don't regret it.

 

The beach I live on is quite private, even during normal high season. In a travel magazine poll it was voted as number 9 of "Asia's Top 10 Beaches", there were only one other Thai beach on the list, and that was primary due to the feeling of privacy. Often little late in evenings, like after 9 pm or 9:30 pm, there are nobody, and I mean "nobody but me" on the beach.

 

I take a nice walk on the beach every afternoon, with or without dogs - a pair inhabits the house, and some neighboring dogs often follows - an early morning walk is also a possibility, if not both.

 

 

 

Thanks again for that very helpful reply. Excellent point about the corrosion. This is the first I heard about monsoon storms, so also greatly appreciated. What a nice story about securing that plot, glad to hear it worked out well.

 

Like you I would be after a private plot, not among crowded neighbourhoods. I remember the walks on the beach are of course extremely pleasant, on the other hand a large plot also has its advantages. You've certainly given food for thought.

 

Do home owners in Koh Samui also build docks by their house, for boats, or is that rarely done there?

 

 

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12 hours ago, Tanomazu said:

Thanks again for that very helpful reply. Excellent point about the corrosion. This is the first I heard about monsoon storms, so also greatly appreciated. What a nice story about securing that plot, glad to hear it worked out well.

 

Like you I would be after a private plot, not among crowded neighbourhoods. I remember the walks on the beach are of course extremely pleasant, on the other hand a large plot also has its advantages. You've certainly given food for thought.

 

Do home owners in Koh Samui also build docks by their house, for boats, or is that rarely done there?

Concerning monsoon, just to give you an idea...

 

The beach a random normal day with lower tide, but not the lowest, the beachfront corrosion protection wall is more than 2 meters high, with about 1.60 over sand level, it varies a little depending os how much sand is moved by monsoon waves...

IMG_9772_Beach-house(400x656).jpg.b73bcfe8f99d8b73abe93830a68769da.jpg

 

7:30 am morning view, to give an impression of sea level from the raised terrace on top of the corrosion protection wall...

wIMG_8156_Beach-terrasse-view_w1024.jpg.06e3bc26461a0b52e40a4e6b527711f6.jpg

 

And a collage of how it appears during the monsoon...

280)Monsoon-Jan-2016.jpg.b2586d5924c3c69f2f656d0ab123f1e8.jpg

 

Another collage showing the sea levels when the north eastern monsoon hits Samui in the season that lasts from early November till mid January, but it's normally only a week or two with storm, or rather very strong waves...

 

006)w_monsun01-11-2010.jpg.b0aadfb4e3c8b7e29f271aeb7d71c271.jpg

 

And the day after - the by that time neighbor restaurant had not been taking their beach chairs and tables in, thinking that the monsoon season had ended, but it can be rather unpredictable and still hit hard late January, so they lost all chairs and tables over night - I've even seen a whole restaurant with stairs, railings, chairs, tables and terrace sailing by during a monsoon storm - some squatters had tried to make a beach bar under a roof-shade in front of an empty plot waiting for a new home construction to begin, but all had "gone with the wind" apart from half their roof. Our pots with Aloe Vera had disappeared, and they were not just covered by sand, they were gone. Lots of sand can be moved by the monsoon, some places might be total covered, like by the little hut, others can loose almost all beachfront sand, but it might be all back, and more to, after next monsoon...

1318305699_281)wIMG_1494_after-monsoon.jpg.a7c2f2b441ecc3b4aac93424b01c5138.jpg

 

You cannot build anything on the beach without permission from the Marine Department that owns the beaches of Thailand. I'm not sure if it requires a permission to more permanent anchor anything in front of a plot. In principle, to my knowledge, you are not allowed to place sun chairs or making a restaurant on the sand without permission, and keeping free way for passage.

 

I've seen that the new manor being built about 50 meter from my house is having a dock by the side with a wire-cart for a pair of jet-ski, which seems to be rolled up a by motor connected to the steel wire, so a small speedboat or like size should be possible (I just popped by to snap a photo for your inspiration)...

IMG20210714132705_Jetski-dock_CR(800x600).jpg.2fd0c798aa51122ba7a01892678a0704.jpg

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16 hours ago, khunPer said:

Tsunami and earthquake risks are statistically very low - part of my choice - but we never know with the by science presumed supervolcano under Indonesia.

 

Very crowded beaches would probably be out of reach financially for most not relative wealthy folks, whilst the less crowded areas actually seems to be pretty quiet, especially in evenings and early morning.

 

Of major disadvantages are the few weeks with annual monsoon storms, which some years are not much, and other years can provide both high waves, hard wind, and lots of downpour. Furthermore there is the sea salt, everything made with iron and steel rusts fast, even if it's so-called stainless steel, and many non iron metals corrodes. I've noticed a huge difference between the beachfront side and the leeward land side.

 

Of major advantages is the fresh air, and the especially view and feeling; but it's a question of individual lifestyle and personal preferences. There might also be (little) less insects, it's only a few evenings a year I cannot sit outside due to insects, which are after downpour when the termites fly; however it lasts only a few hours, but unfortunately around candlelight-dinner-time.

 

Before choosing a beach remember to check it both in hot season, rainy season and monsoon; furthermore both during low tide and high tide. I almost signed a deal for a several rai big beachfront plot down south, until I checked it one afternoon at low tide, and realized that this was not what I dreamed about. Disappointed I drove back up north where I stayed in a rented bungalow, and realized that beach right there was it. It was last evening before my return to Europe and I had dinner with my girlfriend in a beach restaurant. Thais talks much, so she mentioned to the manager that we had been looking for a beachfront plot, and he said that a restaurant 100 meters from here was for sale. I knew that place, I had had my dinner there before a few years ago, but now it had closed. Don't think too much, meanwhile it might be gone. Within the next three hours I had decided to buy, which was easy, meet the owner, made a sales agreement in front of the head-of-village as witness, cashed out a 100,000 baht deposit from an ATM, promised to transfer another million baht within short time, and off to the airport. If it was pure luck, something divine, or plain coincidence, I don't know, but I don't regret it.

 

The beach I live on is quite private, even during normal high season. In a travel magazine poll it was voted as number 9 of "Asia's Top 10 Beaches", there were only one other Thai beach on the list, and that was primary due to the feeling of privacy. Often little late in evenings, like after 9 pm or 9:30 pm, there are nobody, and I mean "nobody but me" on the beach.

 

I take a nice walk on the beach every afternoon, with or without dogs - a pair inhabits the house, and some neighboring dogs often follows - an early morning walk is also a possibility, if not both.

 

 

 

I really appreciate the info on the monsoon storms, especially with the pictures it gives an excellent impression of what it is really like. Superb post, thanks again.

 

Nice house, btw, and the view is superb clearly.

 

So you do need protection from the sea and the monsoon storms can be quite violent, though for a few weeks only. This is really good to know.

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Just to give another picture. I bought 1/2 rai (800 sqm) about 200 meters from the ring road for 1M baht (1,250 baht a sqm) in the south, not far from Wat Thanon. Best beach closest to me is Lamai's which is less then a 10 minute drive and more laid back "natural beaches" nearby as well. Being on an island you are never too far from a beach. I have not started my build yet but it will also be economical. It will be a single floor house of about 250sqm with a large pool and terrace. Many options on Samui.

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  • 4 months later...

Hello, I have question for you "Khun Per" , thank you for all your details that really help. Is your roof still perfectly waterproof after these bir rain that we have in Samui ?  Thank you ...

 

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1 hour ago, Griloux said:

Hello, I have question for you "Khun Per" , thank you for all your details that really help. Is your roof still perfectly waterproof after these bir rain that we have in Samui ?  Thank you ...

Still tight roof...👍 Rain was worse - much worse - in 2011, and by that time also perfect water tight roof...🙂

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