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Thailand Sets Promising Future for EV


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BANGKOK (NNT) - Thailand is currently focusing on transforming its vehicle manufacturing of internal combustion engines to electric vehicles. The government’s policies and the public sector’s MOUs are supporting Thai carmakers in order to achieve the goal of Thailand being the EV hub of the region.

 

According to Mr. Krisada Uttamote, President of the Electric Vehicle Association of Thailand, Thailand is highly capable of carmaking. In 2021, Thailand produced around 1.6 million car. Half of them were for import.

 

Meanwhile, many countries in the world have already launched policies to eliminate internal combustion engine vehicles. It is expected that by 2035, EVs will make up 50% of the global vehicle market. The Thai government and automakers then have to adapt for the change.

 

Mr. Krisada said policies such as the reduction of excise tax and import tax, bringing in new entrepreneurs, helping existing carmakers transform to EV makers will help promote the use of EV.

 

In addition, recently, the association has signed MOUs with educational institutes to produce graduates who are experts in EV.

 

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EV unless it's hybrid this is just a scam.

 

Electric vehicles pollute at the power plant not the exhaust pipe.

 

Those batteries are worthless when spent and totally toxic. I'd read a replacement Tesla battery is 20k USD.

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3 hours ago, AgentSmith said:

Lithium batteries are all recycled, or they get a second life as part of power storage for homes or businesses. When charged and maintained properly they have an expected life span of up to 30 years. Yes they are toxic but so are lead acid batteries and those also definitely don't end up as waste for the same reason being their parts are simply too valuable to just throw away.

 

Hybrid cars are not a scam. In fact I would love to be able to buy a small plugin hybrid in Thailand for shorter distances. It would mean I could drive 95% of all trips entirely on electricity. Because hybrid EVs have a relatively small battery they're much cheaper than pure EVs which most western people still can't afford let alone Thai. The fact they can also run in fossil fuel is a huge advantage in a country that's facing major challenges in upgrading its power grid.

 

EVs over their lifespan produce a fraction of the CO2 of a similar vehicle with a combustion engine. The idea that EVs pollute just as much has been debunked so many times now. Science is pretty clear that EVs are the way forward. Best if you just keep up with developments.

Don't waste your time and energy defending EVs.

 

They don't need it........they are a done deal.

 

The sort of people opposing them would have opposed the ideas of this man:

 

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Their attitude is frequently age related and nothing to do with "reason".

 

It is their "state of mind".

 

Congratulations if you are over 35 and still possess the ability to change yours.


 

 

 

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Anyway, back to the subject of the OP, which is not "Are EVs a good or a bad thing?"

 

Ridiculous implication in the headline and the article that Thailand is setting the agenda for the transformation of Japanese car manufacture.

 

There are no Thai cars being manufactured........Thais are employed by Japanese manufacturers to build Japanese designed cars.

 

The EV agenda is set according to international governmental decisions.

 

The Japanese car manufacturers are going to build only EVs.

 

Thailand will do what it's told to.

 

On the other hand it is a great time for start ups..........there's no mystery about manufacturing a box and putting a wheel at each corner.......China is awash with new manufacturers.

 

No reason why Thailand couldn't do it..............😄

 

 

Edited by Enoon
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The future for EV in Thailand starts with the deployment of EV charging stations and with regulating standards for them.

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I think a lot of electricity in Thailand comes from Hydro Dams in Laos, not as damaging to the air quality as you'd think.

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15 hours ago, TheScience said:

EV unless it's hybrid this is just a scam.

 

Electric vehicles pollute at the power plant not the exhaust pipe.

 

Those batteries are worthless when spent and totally toxic. I'd read a replacement Tesla battery is 20k USD.

Recently it was reported a Tesla battery car completed a million miles would you do that amount of milage in your lifetime I doubt I would 

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15 hours ago, TheScience said:

EV unless it's hybrid this is just a scam.

 

Electric vehicles pollute at the power plant not the exhaust pipe.

 

Those batteries are worthless when spent and totally toxic. I'd read a replacement Tesla battery is 20k USD.

I hear you,

who wants the  hassle of  having to go all the way to your power plan for your pollution when you can have it right  in your garage.  😀

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10 minutes ago, crazykopite said:

Recently it was reported a Tesla battery car completed a million miles would you do that amount of milage in your lifetime I doubt I would 

 

Certainly not in my remaining lifetime, I drive about 2,000km a month so a million miles would take me 50 years and I'd be 112 years of age.

 

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This is good news. Car manufacturers have already planned their exit from petrol vehicles. There is no debate at this point.

Thailand may as well get on that bandwagon.

 

 

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I can see the middle and HiSo classes switching to EV, but I doubt you’ll get the farmers out of their 30 year old diesel pickups belching black smoke.

 

It would be so easy to start with motorbikes/scooters, everyone can lift out the battery and plug it in at home.

 

I drive a BEV by the way. I’ll never switch back to ICE, it’s a far superior experience.

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How many miles can those special tires last for on the Tesla, and how much do they cost to replace?

  I also wonder why they are necessary? Oh and the batteries will be used for other things when they

are to old to be in the EV? Really.  Guess time will tell, like it always does.

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8 hours ago, Puccini said:

The future for EV in Thailand starts with the deployment of EV charging stations and with regulating standards for them.

How often  would people drive so far on a dally that they would need an EV charging station?  It's clear that a lot less EV charging stations will be needed than is currently the case with petrol stations.

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6 minutes ago, placeholder said:

How often  would people drive so far on a dally that they would need an EV charging station?  It's clear that a lot less EV charging stations will be needed than is currently the case with petrol stations.

I think the same applies with ICE vehicles,

How often you drive far for them and need a gas station?  The think is rage anxiety, not that you often need the range but that you have it when you need it. If you have two cars , one of them being an EV for the daily short rides is perfectly fine, but if you only have one car then you need to be able to go where ever you want , when ever you want. .  Fir us , there is only the two of us so we only need and have one car, so an EV would not be practical. A plug in hybrid would be more practical giving us the best of both worlds, but any savings if fuel we realize would be eaten by the higher cost of the plug in hybrid so we will wait a few years until we make a move towards that direction. 

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12 minutes ago, sirineou said:

I think the same applies with ICE vehicles,

How often you drive far for them and need a gas station?  The think is rage anxiety, not that you often need the range but that you have it when you need it. If you have two cars , one of them being an EV for the daily short rides is perfectly fine, but if you only have one car then you need to be able to go where ever you want , when ever you want. .  Fir us , there is only the two of us so we only need and have one car, so an EV would not be practical. A plug in hybrid would be more practical giving us the best of both worlds, but any savings if fuel we realize would be eaten by the higher cost of the plug in hybrid so we will wait a few years until we make a move towards that direction. 

The thing is, to Fuel an Ice vehicle, you always need a gas station. Unless you keep a hefty supply of petrol/gasoline/diesel/natural gas at home. So you will need to go to a local station to get a refill. That wouldn't be the case for those who can charge their EV's at home.

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1 hour ago, placeholder said:

The thing is, to Fuel an Ice vehicle, you always need a gas station. Unless you keep a hefty supply of petrol/gasoline/diesel/natural gas at home. So you will need to go to a local station to get a refill. That wouldn't be the case for those who can charge their EV's at home.

That's true, I understand your point, being able to charge at home would take the load off from charging stations,  but at this point a gas station can service to full capacity  an ICE vehicle in les than 5 min, so in an hour it can service 12 vehicles where an EV chagrin station can only service one vehicle , so you need 12x to service the same number of vehicles. 

   As I said, I have no problem with EVs , they are certainly the future. and I don't think the infrastructure would be a problem for the reasons you mentioned and more. but at this point it would not make convenience or economic sense for me. 

The Thai car manufactures would do good to adjust to the new realities or go the way of the buggy whip makers. 

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