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How come English speakers are incomprehensible to others?


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2 minutes ago, pub2022 said:

How come english native speakers do not know how to properly use it's/its and there/their?

 

   They do generally know that , its just arduous making an apostrophe and so don't bother and sometimes there and their are used in the wrong place , just a mistake 

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9 minutes ago, spidermike007 said:

Are you referring to all English speakers, or just British? Some Brits have very strong accents. Most say Americans are fairly easy to understand. The accent, if they have one, is fairly flat.

I tend to agree with you.  Americans also have various regional dialects which can also make a difference.  People in Thailand have commented that my English is easy to understand.   I can converse in the local Hawaiian pidgin English, but have chosen not to.  So truthfully, I don't if I speak in any discernible dialect.

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22 minutes ago, spidermike007 said:

Are you referring to all English speakers, or just British? Some Brits have very strong accents. Most say Americans are fairly easy to understand. The accent, if they have one, is fairly flat

Indeed I got your point Americans are more easy to understand, I am principally referring to British and Australians. 

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5 minutes ago, Polar Bear said:

Euro English is a separate dialect (or set of dialects, depending on how you want to break it down) to standard English. As it's primarily used as a lingua franca, it is typically spoken more slowly, the vocabulary and grammar are slightly simplified, and it's more concrete because idioms rarely translate well. Naturally, the parts that have been dropped in Euro English are the parts that learners find most difficult. If that's what you have primarily been exposed to, of course you will find British/American/Whatever English more difficult to understand, especially if the speaker has an accent or uses a local dialect. The solution is to practice listening to a wider variety of dialects.

Americans often struggle more with British accents compared to Brits who generally have fewer problems with American accents. That's partly down to there being a wider range of strong accents in the UK, but it's mostly because we are exposed to a lot more American English through TV and movies. When British accents do make it in American media they are usually received pronunciation and bear little resemblance to how most people actually talk. Brits flounder just as much when faced with a strong unfamiliar American accent. (And I once had a very confusing conversation with a Glaswegian Rasta. My Scottish friend had to translate because despite us both supposedly speaking English we didn't appear to have any language in common at all.)

Find movies where actors have local accents or watch/listen to local news from around the world. If you are serious about it, there are plenty of materials online for English learners who need to understand a broader range of dialects.

Funny that you mention that.  I have a friend from the UK that jokes around with me as to what English accent he was going to use for the day.  I though he was pretty good in his imitations.

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18 minutes ago, bignok said:

Aussies no accent. You should all copy Aussies.

 

Americans and Aussies seem to understand each other pretty well, except for the occasional idiom.

 

Among Brits, I once happened to meet an Oxford grad (in Pattaya) who spoke English. Very urbane, witty, conversant on all manner of topics, not just beer, birds, ball, and bashing.

Edited by BigStar
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19 minutes ago, treetops said:

 

OP appears to be talking about native English speakers.  Everyone you refer to doesn't appear to fall into that category.

Sorry, I missed that point.  The people I mentioned evidently were schooled by American native-speaker instructors.  I know my girl's niece was.

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In most countries you learn the official language at school and talk your local dialect at home/friends/shops so when you meet somebody from out of town you can still have a normal conversation. The Brits don't seem to have that system and want us all to understand their particular lingo. Same when they need to speak another language, they just talk their talk only louder.

 

BTW. I really would like to know the difference and correct use of, sleeping and asleep.

Edited by bubblegum
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1 minute ago, worgeordie said:

There's almost as much British bashing as Thai on ASEANNOW  , if you don't understand us

learn to live with it, as i am proud of my accent and would not change it for the World , learn

to be proud of who you are ,

 

regards Worgeordie

 

Why would you be proud of something you had nothing to do with? 

 

Be proud of being a kind person. 

 

 

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