Jump to content

Urgent Course Being Launched To Train 5,000 Nurses In 2 Years Amid Severe Shortage


webfact

Recommended Posts

image.jpeg

 

AMID a critical shortage of 50,000 nurses nationwide, the Public Health Ministry is now launching an urgent course to train 2,500  of them a year over two years for a total of 5,000 starting next year, TV Channel 7 said late afternoon today (Feb. 21).

 

Public Health Minister Chonlanan Srikaew said senior officials had approved a proposal from Praboromarajchanok Institute and the Nursing and Midwifery Council to quickly train more nurses.

 

An intensive course of two and half years is being introduced for bachelor’s degree graduates in any field, but it would be helpful if they have studied in a medical science field, he said, however adding that there are questions about the readiness of training process and the necessary budget with the National Health Commission and other agencies involved preparing a summary to table to the cabinet.

 

by TNR Staff 

Thai nurses on duty. Photos: Thai Rath

 

Full story: The Thaiger 2024-02-22

 

- Cigna offers a range of visa-compliant plans that meet the minimum requirement of medical treatment, including COVID-19, up to THB 3m. For more information on all expat health insurance plans click here.

 

Get our Daily Newsletter - Click HERE to subscribe

 

Join us now!

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, webfact said:

Public Health Minister Chonlanan Srikaew said senior officials had approved a proposal from Praboromarajchanok Institute and the Nursing and Midwifery Council to quickly train more nurses.

Maybe the question as to why young people do not wish to become nurses should be asked?

  • Agree 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, webfact said:

the Public Health Ministry is now launching an urgent course to train 2,500  of them a year over two years

Could they cut it down to a 20 minute video???🙄

  • Haha 1
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, webfact said:

however adding that there are questions about the readiness of training process and the necessary budget with the National Health Commission and other agencies involved preparing a summary to table to the cabinet.

 

 

Ideas are easy. Implementing them effectively without any planning is a recipe for failure.

 

The MoPH already has a Village Health Care force with over one million volunteers. Expand that, and train 10% upwards to Practical Nurses.

 

 

These volunteers have been a key part of primary health care in Thailand during the past four decades. They undertake health surveys, collect data, maintain family health records, and do disease prevention campaigns to support the public health authorities. In times of outbreaks, their meticulous records of the medical histories of community members are used for contact tracing and health monitoring.

 

https://www.who.int/thailand/news/feature-stories/detail/thailands-1-million-village-health-volunteers-unsung-heroes-are-helping-guard-communities-nationwide-from-covid-19#:~:text=The Ministry of Public Health,during the COVID-19 outbreak.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thumbs Up 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, thaibeachlovers said:

Just for the heck of it, the photo is of a badly trained nurse, but I doubt any non nurses will realise why.

It's because she is wearing a bracelet or watch on her left wrist, which is a big no no as it's contaminated. Nurses should not wear anything below the elbow, which is why they have watches that pin to their upper body area.

Nurses have to wash their hands dozens of times a working day to prevent transferring nasties from one patient to another, and that includes above the wrist- not possible to do properly if wearing a watch or bracelet.

I reckon it is a posed photo of a model wearing a white tunic and writing something on a clipboard...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, tandor said:

It's got me puzzled why all the hospitals Public and Private employ such large numbers of qualified nurses doing clerical work when this task could be given to the Public/Civil Service and thus free up the trained/skilled nurses for more hands on medical work where they're really needed. My observations for what it's worth.

IMO Drs, who actually run hospitals, like having handmaidens to follow them around waiting on their every word.

I had an operation in a Thai hospital and all my actual care was done by non registered nurses. The only time I saw a registered nurse, she was following a Dr. Even my medication was given by a non registered nurse, and she did everything wrong when doing so.

  • Sad 1
  • Agree 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, jacko45k said:

I  was chatting to a Visa agent lady as she drove me recently and she told ne how she was treated badly while working at one of Pattaya's main hospitals and ultimately quit. I get an impression they are poorly treated while the docs drive sports cars!

I worked at many hospitals in my career, and in none of them were nurses treated well. That is hospitals in NZ, Saudi, and London. I did agency in London so worked in dozens of London hospitals and most were bad for nursing. London hospitals needed agency nurses in vast numbers because they couldn't get nurses to be permanent staff as the wages were so bad for permanent staff. On one shift in a London hospital there was one permanent staff member and all the other staff were agency or poorly trained nursing assistants for 30 patients.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, tandor said:

It's got me puzzled why all the hospitals Public and Private employ such large numbers of qualified nurses doing clerical work when this task could be given to the Public/Civil Service and thus free up the trained/skilled nurses for more hands on medical work where they're really needed. My observations for what it's worth.

Excellent observation. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, herfiehandbag said:

I reckon it is a posed photo of a model wearing a white tunic and writing something on a clipboard...

Can't you ever agree with anything? He never claimed it was a real nurse. 

  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have one in the family, nurses everywhere are never paid enough.

Extra overtime, unpaid in many cases, or they have to claw it out of hospital's mountain of money.

The additional duties, unrelated to physical nursing as mentioned previously.

It's like the lady's who look like cleaners in the banks, but then when you turn around they are updating somebody's passbook.

 

 

My pappy always told me pay the people who teach you, heal you and protect you their rightful due, all three are most times thankless tasks.

 

Plus, I need the hottie nurse to tell me that my BP is too high so I that can reply, my BP is just fine it must be you! <wink>

- does she surreptitiously start looking for the red alert button?  sure, but for a split second she is amused, or exasperated, it's hard to tell..

 

 

 

Edited by fondue zoo
  • Thumbs Up 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the US, many of the surgical nurses are from the PI. They earn $100,000 a year. Some are doctors from the PI. Some are surgeons. Very talented and extremely competent. 

 

Pay a fair wage, treat your workers well, don't ask them to work silly hours without overtime pay, and you don't end up with a shortage of talent. Thailand has not learned that lesson yet. Apparently neither has the PI. 

  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, retarius said:

Can't you ever agree with anything? He never claimed it was a real nurse. 

Well I am sorry that you feel that I was disagreeing. 

 

Whilst it is true that I rarely agree with @thaibeachlovers, on this occasion I was merely commenting on the photograph, not disagreeing with his point on hygiene protocols for nurses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It takes a lot more than two years to train a nurse now I know why the government hospitals in Thailand have a low standard of care it’s up to families to take care of there loved ones the nurses do very basic services such as blood pressure, temperature I experienced this when my wife was an inpatient on at least two occasions I did the majority of the  running around when I complained that my wife was in much pain the nurse said that my wife should have told them and they would of given her something for the pain 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, thaibeachlovers said:

I worked at many hospitals in my career, and in none of them were nurses treated well. That is hospitals in NZ, Saudi, and London. I did agency in London so worked in dozens of London hospitals and most were bad for nursing. London hospitals needed agency nurses in vast numbers because they couldn't get nurses to be permanent staff as the wages were so bad for permanent staff. On one shift in a London hospital there was one permanent staff member and all the other staff were agency or poorly trained nursing assistants for 30 patients.

Having worked for the NHS in a Senior Management Role most nurse who are from agencies are very well qualified and experienced nurses unfortunately when they brought in to cover for short falls the full time nurses employed permanently by the hospital trust can be unhelpful my ex wife left the NHS she worked via nursing agencies as the salary was at least double to what she was earning eventually she found employment as a nurse practitioner heading up a large family clinic earning an extremely good salary 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, webfact said:

AMID a critical shortage of 50,000 nurses nationwide, the Public Health Ministry is now launching an urgent course to train 2,500  of them a year over two years for a total of 5,000 starting next year, TV Channel 7 said late afternoon today (Feb. 21).

So 10 years to train them all??  50k needed a total of 5,000 ?? is it me? can anyone explain this math theory to me.? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Niece is going through nursing school in Phetchabun, its a 4-year course. Next time I see her I'll ask some simple first aid things and see how much is really being taught. My wife isn't too sure about it though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.




×
×
  • Create New...