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Defence Ministry Unveils Clear Salary Guidelines Amid Conscription Scandal


webfact

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To quell public outrage, the Defence Ministry unveiled comprehensive guidelines detailing what can and cannot be deducted from conscripts’ salaries.

 

The move comes in the wake of a recent scandal involving dubious salary deductions by the 22nd Logistics and Supports Battalion.

 

The new guidelines, which were released on the ministry’s website today, are aimed at bringing clarity to permissible deductions from the 11,000 baht monthly salary of conscripts.

 

This announcement follows last week’s uproar over reports that 990 baht was deducted from conscripts’ salaries for septic tank cleaning expenses—a claim that stirred significant public discomfort.

 

Although the Royal Thai Army (RTA) initially denied these deductions were for septic tank maintenance, it admitted that such actions had been under consideration. As a response, the involved battalion commander was reassigned to an inactive position.

 

The new policies are structured into three clear categories: deductions without consent, deductions with consent, and prohibited deductions. Permissible, non-consensual deductions include a 70 baht daily charge for meals and personal items that conscripts cannot procure on their own. Items like laundry services and uniform repairs can only be deducted with the conscripts' explicit consent.

 

Significantly, deductions for infrastructure costs, such as septic tank cleaning and Wi-Fi services, are now explicitly banned. Equally important, the costs of training items like backpacks, essential health supplies like Covid-19 tests, flu masks, and hand sanitiser are also barred from being deducted.

 

Adding another layer of protection, the Defence Ministry specified that life insurance premiums should be covered by military business profits, not conscripts’ salaries. Commanders who overcharge conscripts will face penalties, as outlined in the guidelines.

 

The move has been described as a significant step towards transparency, but it also highlights the role of public scrutiny in affecting change. The Defence Ministry hopes these new measures will bring fairness and clarity to conscript salaries, ensuring they receive what they rightfully earn.

 

Picture courtesy: Thai Army PR Center

 

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-- 2024-06-21

 

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5 hours ago, webfact said:

the Defence Ministry unveiled comprehensive guidelines detailing what can and cannot be deducted from conscripts’ salaries.

Or just keep it simple - eliminate conscription

Use the savings for free university enrollment.

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6 hours ago, Emdog said:

"...life insurance premiums should be covered by military business profits, not conscripts’ salaries."

What and how do ' military business profits' happen? " hard to tell what sort of biz they're in

Have gun, will travel?

 

Which leaves many question marks:

- Who is entitled to life insurance?

- Copy of the actual specific documents showing full name, DOB, start date and end date, details of benefits etc? I asked the son of my BIL about Conscript Life Insurance. He said 'never heard of it' and he asked at the office where he's posted 'never heard of it'.

- What military business profits: what companies, and what happens if no profits?

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7 hours ago, webfact said:

Although the Royal Thai Army (RTA) initially denied these deductions were for septic tank maintenance, it admitted that such actions had been under consideration. As a response, the involved battalion commander was reassigned to an inactive position

990 baht per month... that's a lot of #$@$

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It seems that conscription is a method of gaining cannon fodder for wealthy Hiso's who have bought their commissioned officer status to manage. Otherwise the army would become top heavy with 'Officers' The so called salaries of these conscripts are diverted to the bank accounts of their superiors. It seems that conscription is totally unnecessary if the army was just a fighting force, as it should be. The conscripts appear to be used like slave labour to service the army's business interests and give the army an unfair commercial advantage 

Edited by RobU
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It is quite simply a racket.

 

A conscript battalion produces some 2 million BAHT in cash every month: 400 soldiers having 50% of their B11,000 salaries deducted every month.

 

None of these battalions have any real military significance - most of their kit, vehicles or weapons are knackered. But lots of money, and land, infrastructure and labour which can be used for a wide variety of business activities, generating even more cash.

 

The only units kept anywhere near "up to speed" are the few in and around Bangkok which may be used to seize and or maintain political power. Most of those are now hamstrung by competing political rivalries. There is a small ( about brigade sized) "Praetorian Guard" which has modern equipment and is deployable; the rest (some 500,000) are militarily irrelevant, untrained, no real transport or capacity, or role, other than generating cash for their commanders.

 

Edited by herfiehandbag
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