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Seeing red over political mismanagement

By Somroutai Sapsomboon

The Nation on Sunday

Former Democrat supporter Kokaew Pikulthong explains why he is proud to be a Pheu Thai party list MP

Fifteen years ago, Kokaew Pikulthong, like most other southern Thais, supported the Democrats. Today, he's a red shirt leader who has no respect at all for his former party.

"I was like any southerner with an interest in politics. I'd liked the Democrat party since I was teenager," says the 46-year-old.

The Phang-nga native recalls supporting local Democrat Jurin Laksanawisit from the beginning of Jurin's first election campaign. On that occasion he failed to win the vote but the former education minister he soon became a Phang-nga MP.

After graduating from Chulalongkorn University's engineering faculty, Kokaew started his own business in Bangkok.

His love affair with the Democrats came to an end in 1998 when Thailand fell victim to the Asian economics crisis. His business was one of the many affected and the government in power at that time, the Democrats, appeared powerless in facing up to the problems.

"I had to lay off about 50 staff. That was very hard for me to do as they were like family."

Although the crisis had started during the previous Chavalit Yongchaiyudh-led government, Kokaew believes the Democrats' inability to handle the problem made the situation worse.

"Businesses were collapsing left, right and centre but [former] prime minister Chuan Leekpai worked so slowly. I lost all my confidence in the party: I couldn't support the Democrats any longer."

Thaksin inspires Kokaew to enter politics

Kokaew's hopes for economic recovery were revived by a new star on the political scene, Thaksin Shinawatra, founder of the Thai Rak Thai party."

"Thaksin was a successful businessman. He was the best choice for the future," says Kokaew, who set about helping the party's candidate in his constituency, Yannawa, in the 2001 election campaign. To his disgust, the Thai Rak Thai candidate lost to a Democrat.

The failed candidate later left politics, so Kokaew decided to fill the void and became a regular participant at events in the constituency. He didn't run in the 2005 election, however, as Khunying Sudarat Keyarapan, the party's leader for Bangkok, had another candidate in mind: former actor Danuporn Punnakan.

"I was too young for politics so I didn't lobby Khunying Sudarat or any of the key party members, I only made myself known to the people," he explains.

His talents were recognised though, and after the election, Kokaew was assigned to help then deputy transport minister Phumtham Wechayachai. He was appointed as caretaker director of now-defunct Express Transportation Organisation to study how to deal with business losses. Kokaew later suggested that the unit either been entirely rehabilitated or dissolved, and the ministers took his advice and closed it down.

His first real friend in Thai Rak Thai was Jatuporn Promphan. "Back then, Jatuporn was a nobody, just like me. We're both southerners and around the same age, so we became close."

After the 2006 coup, Kokaew went back to running his business. When Jatuporn asked him to join the People Television (PTV), he agreed without hesitation.

"In truth, I don't like to be anybody's enemy. If I had known I would become part of a conflict, I would have thought harder before joining," says Kokaew, adding quickly, "but, I'm glad to have played my part in protecting democracy."

Kokaew was one of the red shirt leaders jailed after the government crackdown on the red shirt rally last year. "I was jailed for nine months and three days," he says of his time in prison.

He has a two-year-old daughter who was still a baby when he went to jail. His wife Kulrat is six months pregnant and the parents-to-be are delighted that the new arrival will be a boy.

Kokaew ran in the Bangkok by-election last year under the Pheu Thai party but was pipped to the post by a Democrat. He did better in the July 3 general election and is now a party-list MP.

Thaksin should be given a chance to return home

He says he sees Thaksin as both asset and liability to the Yingluck government. "He is our government's strong and weak point. Because of Thaksin, Pheu Thai won the election. But Thaksin has many enemies and they may try to destroy the government too," he says.

"Thaksin is smart enough to know that the more political moves he makes, the more Yingluck and her government will be affected. If he stays quietly in the background, the government will benefit."

Would he like to see Thaksin return to power? Kokaew smiles. "Actually, I want him to be prime minister again, but I'm worried that his return will create more conflict.

"However, I believe that Thaksin only wants to come back home and stay with his family and I think we, the Thai people should give him a chance.

"The best scenario is for Thaksin to stay at home and give some advice to the government," he concludes.

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-- The Nation 2011-09-11

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My friend "Billy' was visiting me when the earthquake struck. My house was destroyed so I started hating 'Billy'.

'Billy' and I got picked on by 'Jack' at school. He also hated 'Billy', so I did my best to become 'Jack's friend. It paid off, because just as Jack and I became friends, a funny movie came out in the cinema. Thanks Jack.

When the police arrested Jack for murder, I knew it couldn't be true. Someone else must have put all those bodies in Jack's house. I know, I hate Billy so it must have been him.

I also hate whoever made this dam_n Sudoku. Obviously they messed up, because it says easy but it's not.

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wow, pretty amazing for The Nation.

-------

It is nice to be able to read someone's story like this. Although just a quick peek into their history, none the less, it gives a glimpse of their personal history (engineering, business, politics, family) and into their political thoughts and motivations (disillusionment, democracy, support & action).

@kkvampire, as a university educated engineer & entrepreneur, I suspect that Kokaew is neither naive, nor stupid, not typical of the broader red-shirt population, nor anyone's minion. You may not agree with his ideas and politics, but he tells his own story here, and it is perfectly understandable to see how he came to where he is today.

Cheers - Tom

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@kkvampire, as a university educated engineer & entrepreneur, I suspect that Kokaew is neither naive, nor stupid, not typical of the broader red-shirt population, nor anyone's minion. You may not agree with his ideas and politics, but he tells his own story here, and it is perfectly understandable to see how he came to where he is today.

Indeed it is a comfort to see that even now in this day and age the old tried and trusted methods of achieving political success still work.

brownnose.jpg

Edited by siampolee
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I suspect that if he were any more of a mug, he would have a handle in the middle of his back.

Read this soft-soap interview with a touch of cynicism and his image becomes clearer;

His business folds due to the asian economic crisis - of course that can't be because of his failure to adapt, it must be the government's fault.

He is inspired by Thaksin, despite all the evidence that the man is corrupt - I wonder what he aspires to.

Doesn't want to be anybody's enemy, but gets sucked into the red shirt mess.

Becomes a "people's politician" and is rejected. No worries, get on the party list.

Is glad he joined the "fight for democracy" - probably will never see the light and realise he was used to get thaksin's cronies back into power.

Thinks Thaksin should be allowed to return because he has a lot to offer - whereas Thaksin wants to return because there is still a lot to take.

How about an interview with some REAL questions, like is corruption acceptable, why were armed militants allowed to mix with protesters, was it necessary to burn BKK ?

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I suspect that if he were any more of a mug, he would have a handle in the middle of his back.

Read this soft-soap interview with a touch of cynicism and his image becomes clearer;

His business folds due to the asian economic crisis - of course that can't be because of his failure to adapt, it must be the government's fault.

He is inspired by Thaksin, despite all the evidence that the man is corrupt - I wonder what he aspires to.

Doesn't want to be anybody's enemy, but gets sucked into the red shirt mess.

Becomes a "people's politician" and is rejected. No worries, get on the party list.

Is glad he joined the "fight for democracy" - probably will never see the light and realise he was used to get thaksin's cronies back into power.

Thinks Thaksin should be allowed to return because he has a lot to offer - whereas Thaksin wants to return because there is still a lot to take.

How about an interview with some REAL questions, like is corruption acceptable, why were armed militants allowed to mix with protesters, was it necessary to burn BKK ?

Perhaps you'd prefer something like this........... I make no apologies for posting this in all its full gut wrenching, hagiographic, nauseousness. How did this superman NOT get elected again?

The First Family

UPDATE : 8 July 2009

In Thailand we've had Constitutional Democracy for many decades and almost 30 prime ministers but none of those prime ministers' families are very prominent.

I use the term first family loosely because in the country, we have our Royal Family, which is above all. But I believe there is a void in politics that a more prominent first family can fulfill and who better to start this era of 'change' in Thailand than our Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva.

PM Abhisit is a dream-come-true prime minister for a lot of people, including myself. He cuts a dashing figure and is an asset to the country when traveling abroad with his fluent English skill. He's not just a pretty face but is talented as well, with extensive political experience and economic and social knowledge. Most importantly, he has a vision of how politics should be, 100% corruption free, and that truly endears him to my heart.

To further boost his popularity especially with people in the provinces, which he has not gotten around in doing so, he should market his picture-perfect family like no politicians have done so. I don't mean in the way of the political dynasties like we have of the Silapa-archa family, the Chidchob family, the Charnveerakul family and so on. I mean the happy family image like the Obama family in the U.S.

PM Abhisit's family is an asset and he should market that. His wife, Associate Professor Doctor Pimpen, is a gorgeous woman who's well-read and a professional working woman. Their children seem to be well-behaved with one just starting college. A local magazine had carried articles about the PM and his wife attending the orientation of their daughter and it made me hunger for more of this beautiful family.

The PM has always said his family values their privacy but I think it is time for them to sacrifice that and step into the public eye for the advancement of Khun Abhisit's career like no politicians have done before. They have what it takes to make it big and it will just require a little effort.

The PM has been having difficulties visiting the provinces, fearing red-shirt supporters' opposition and possible chaos so to fill that void like no one else can, he can send his wife. Since Khun Pimpen's an academic and a professor, she can dabble in trying to improve the livelihoods of school teachers and college professors nationwide. This issue is after all a key problem and something that needs to be addressed as part of educational reform. She can start visiting teachers and professors in the provinces as part of a project to improve their livelihoods. Their daughter, Nong Maprang, can be invited to take part in the various campaigns for teenagers against drugs, etc. She has artistic skills so she should be able to truly contribute. Even Khun Abhisit's parents and siblings should be marketed to improve his popularity.

The Vejjajiva family is truly a talented family and it is time for them to put their abilities to use to help the country and help Khun Abhisit achieve even greater popularity. I am confident they will not be merely figureheads but can really lend a hand for the various causes that they support. I hope to see a worthy first family with Khun Abhisit as prime minister.

Story by: Chadaporn Lin

http://www.thailando...?DataID=1016089

Chadaporn Lin is a presenter and "journalist" for the in no way biased news outlet TAN.

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I suspect that if he were any more of a mug, he would have a handle in the middle of his back.

Read this soft-soap interview with a touch of cynicism and his image becomes clearer;

His business folds due to the asian economic crisis - of course that can't be because of his failure to adapt, it must be the government's fault.

He is inspired by Thaksin, despite all the evidence that the man is corrupt - I wonder what he aspires to.

Doesn't want to be anybody's enemy, but gets sucked into the red shirt mess.

Becomes a "people's politician" and is rejected. No worries, get on the party list.

Is glad he joined the "fight for democracy" - probably will never see the light and realise he was used to get thaksin's cronies back into power.

Thinks Thaksin should be allowed to return because he has a lot to offer - whereas Thaksin wants to return because there is still a lot to take.

How about an interview with some REAL questions, like is corruption acceptable, why were armed militants allowed to mix with protesters, was it necessary to burn BKK ?

you guys are so funny.

The Drivel showers roses over the Dems and you people don't say squat, but if it is a piece about red shirt, suddenly you know how to "read critically".

maybe you should remember : in the financial crisis of the 90s a lot of companies went under - and it was primarily due to imposed conditions from the IMF which (and yeah, it's documented) made the situation worse. The Dem government in the 90s fell in due to extraordinary corruption. This guy runs out of the democratic strong-hold, how many PTP were elected in the south? But you imply he is a failure. He took a stand against a military coup which in his mind is a fight for democracy, but clearly not in your mind. Yay for TVF democracy. Sure he feels that Thaskin should come back - and other people feel that he shouldn't - but his right to an opinion is called "being used" by you. And let's just forget that it was the PAD who were the first "armed-militants" or that the protests last year were peaceful for over a month before the violence started. Let's forget that the PM Abhisit rejected the request to hold elections (which is what had to happen in the end anyway), and that 90+ people are now dead because of it. And let's forget that the government was the side doing the killing on a 10-1 scale - why was that ?? Why did they use a sniper to kill an ex-military man while he was giving an interview? Why did the government authorize, EVER, the use of lethal force against the protesters? And *someone* did torch Central World (do you know how hard it is to set a building like that on fire?) - anyway, last time I was in BKK Central World was looking just fine, but 91 people are still dead - ohhhh, poor burning Bangkok, tears of a clown...

Cheers, Tom

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I suspect that if he were any more of a mug, he would have a handle in the middle of his back.

Read this soft-soap interview with a touch of cynicism and his image becomes clearer;

His business folds due to the asian economic crisis - of course that can't be because of his failure to adapt, it must be the government's fault.

He is inspired by Thaksin, despite all the evidence that the man is corrupt - I wonder what he aspires to.

Doesn't want to be anybody's enemy, but gets sucked into the red shirt mess.

Becomes a "people's politician" and is rejected. No worries, get on the party list.

Is glad he joined the "fight for democracy" - probably will never see the light and realise he was used to get thaksin's cronies back into power.

Thinks Thaksin should be allowed to return because he has a lot to offer - whereas Thaksin wants to return because there is still a lot to take.

How about an interview with some REAL questions, like is corruption acceptable, why were armed militants allowed to mix with protesters, was it necessary to burn BKK ?

Perhaps you'd prefer something like this........... I make no apologies for posting this in all its full gut wrenching, hagiographic, nauseousness. How did this superman NOT get elected again?

The First Family

UPDATE : 8 July 2009

In Thailand we've had Constitutional Democracy for many decades and almost 30 prime ministers but none of those prime ministers' families are very prominent.

I use the term first family loosely because in the country, we have our Royal Family, which is above all. But I believe there is a void in politics that a more prominent first family can fulfill and who better to start this era of 'change' in Thailand than our Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva.

PM Abhisit is a dream-come-true prime minister for a lot of people, including myself. He cuts a dashing figure and is an asset to the country when traveling abroad with his fluent English skill. He's not just a pretty face but is talented as well, with extensive political experience and economic and social knowledge. Most importantly, he has a vision of how politics should be, 100% corruption free, and that truly endears him to my heart.

To further boost his popularity especially with people in the provinces, which he has not gotten around in doing so, he should market his picture-perfect family like no politicians have done so. I don't mean in the way of the political dynasties like we have of the Silapa-archa family, the Chidchob family, the Charnveerakul family and so on. I mean the happy family image like the Obama family in the U.S.

PM Abhisit's family is an asset and he should market that. His wife, Associate Professor Doctor Pimpen, is a gorgeous woman who's well-read and a professional working woman. Their children seem to be well-behaved with one just starting college. A local magazine had carried articles about the PM and his wife attending the orientation of their daughter and it made me hunger for more of this beautiful family.

The PM has always said his family values their privacy but I think it is time for them to sacrifice that and step into the public eye for the advancement of Khun Abhisit's career like no politicians have done before. They have what it takes to make it big and it will just require a little effort.

The PM has been having difficulties visiting the provinces, fearing red-shirt supporters' opposition and possible chaos so to fill that void like no one else can, he can send his wife. Since Khun Pimpen's an academic and a professor, she can dabble in trying to improve the livelihoods of school teachers and college professors nationwide. This issue is after all a key problem and something that needs to be addressed as part of educational reform. She can start visiting teachers and professors in the provinces as part of a project to improve their livelihoods. Their daughter, Nong Maprang, can be invited to take part in the various campaigns for teenagers against drugs, etc. She has artistic skills so she should be able to truly contribute. Even Khun Abhisit's parents and siblings should be marketed to improve his popularity.

The Vejjajiva family is truly a talented family and it is time for them to put their abilities to use to help the country and help Khun Abhisit achieve even greater popularity. I am confident they will not be merely figureheads but can really lend a hand for the various causes that they support. I hope to see a worthy first family with Khun Abhisit as prime minister.

Story by: Chadaporn Lin

http://www.thailando...?DataID=1016089

Chadaporn Lin is a presenter and "journalist" for the in no way biased news outlet TAN.

B)

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I suspect that if he were any more of a mug, he would have a handle in the middle of his back.

Read this soft-soap interview with a touch of cynicism and his image becomes clearer;

His business folds due to the asian economic crisis - of course that can't be because of his failure to adapt, it must be the government's fault.

He is inspired by Thaksin, despite all the evidence that the man is corrupt - I wonder what he aspires to.

Doesn't want to be anybody's enemy, but gets sucked into the red shirt mess.

Becomes a "people's politician" and is rejected. No worries, get on the party list.

Is glad he joined the "fight for democracy" - probably will never see the light and realise he was used to get thaksin's cronies back into power.

Thinks Thaksin should be allowed to return because he has a lot to offer - whereas Thaksin wants to return because there is still a lot to take.

How about an interview with some REAL questions, like is corruption acceptable, why were armed militants allowed to mix with protesters, was it necessary to burn BKK ?

you guys are so funny.

The Drivel showers roses over the Dems and you people don't say squat, but if it is a piece about red shirt, suddenly you know how to "read critically".

maybe you should remember : in the financial crisis of the 90s a lot of companies went under - and it was primarily due to imposed conditions from the IMF which (and yeah, it's documented) made the situation worse. The Dem government in the 90s fell in due to extraordinary corruption. This guy runs out of the democratic strong-hold, how many PTP were elected in the south? But you imply he is a failure. He took a stand against a military coup which in his mind is a fight for democracy, but clearly not in your mind. Yay for TVF democracy. Sure he feels that Thaskin should come back - and other people feel that he shouldn't - but his right to an opinion is called "being used" by you. And let's just forget that it was the PAD who were the first "armed-militants" or that the protests last year were peaceful for over a month before the violence started. Let's forget that the PM Abhisit rejected the request to hold elections (which is what had to happen in the end anyway), and that 90+ people are now dead because of it. And let's forget that the government was the side doing the killing on a 10-1 scale - why was that ?? Why did they use a sniper to kill an ex-military man while he was giving an interview? Why did the government authorize, EVER, the use of lethal force against the protesters? And *someone* did torch Central World (do you know how hard it is to set a building like that on fire?) - anyway, last time I was in BKK Central World was looking just fine, but 91 people are still dead - ohhhh, poor burning Bangkok, tears of a clown...

Cheers, Tom

So none of the governments after the coup were legitimate? Were you here for that election - Samak won for PPP, Then was replaced (unnecessarily) by Somchai, who lost majority when some MPs decided that they were unwilling to form a coalition with electoral cheats. This is a legitimate democratic process, forming an armed militia to overthrow the government is not "fighting for democracy," but he, and others, fail to see that.

The protests were peaceful for a month because the democrat coalition allowed them utmost tolerance. When they attempted a crowd dispersal, the army was attacked - the first casualties were the army commander and other officers. Were you here for that, or have you just forgotten?

You know who killed Seh Daeng - please share it with us.

Why did the government authorise lethal force by the army when they were being shot at, grenaded and killed?

Because YOU think it is hard to set a building alight, that means the red shirts couldn't have done it - are they too stupid? What about all the rhetoric from the leaders SPECIFICALLY about torching those buildings, and the farang idiot who made it on television just before the event.? Coincidence?

Yes a lot of people are dead, and it was planned that way by Thaksin as a way to discredit and besmirch the former government.

Cry your crocodile tears, there were enough real ones from the people of BKK who had their lives and livelihoods disrupted by these ignorant scum, but the supposedly educated farangs that suck up to them are worse.

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I suspect that if he were any more of a mug, he would have a handle in the middle of his back.

Read this soft-soap interview with a touch of cynicism and his image becomes clearer;

His business folds due to the asian economic crisis - of course that can't be because of his failure to adapt, it must be the government's fault.

He is inspired by Thaksin, despite all the evidence that the man is corrupt - I wonder what he aspires to.

Doesn't want to be anybody's enemy, but gets sucked into the red shirt mess.

Becomes a "people's politician" and is rejected. No worries, get on the party list.

Is glad he joined the "fight for democracy" - probably will never see the light and realise he was used to get thaksin's cronies back into power.

Thinks Thaksin should be allowed to return because he has a lot to offer - whereas Thaksin wants to return because there is still a lot to take.

How about an interview with some REAL questions, like is corruption acceptable, why were armed militants allowed to mix with protesters, was it necessary to burn BKK ?

you guys are so funny.

The Drivel showers roses over the Dems and you people don't say squat, but if it is a piece about red shirt, suddenly you know how to "read critically".

maybe you should remember : in the financial crisis of the 90s a lot of companies went under - and it was primarily due to imposed conditions from the IMF which (and yeah, it's documented) made the situation worse. The Dem government in the 90s fell in due to extraordinary corruption. This guy runs out of the democratic strong-hold, how many PTP were elected in the south? But you imply he is a failure. He took a stand against a military coup which in his mind is a fight for democracy, but clearly not in your mind. Yay for TVF democracy. Sure he feels that Thaskin should come back - and other people feel that he shouldn't - but his right to an opinion is called "being used" by you. And let's just forget that it was the PAD who were the first "armed-militants" or that the protests last year were peaceful for over a month before the violence started. Let's forget that the PM Abhisit rejected the request to hold elections (which is what had to happen in the end anyway), and that 90+ people are now dead because of it. And let's forget that the government was the side doing the killing on a 10-1 scale - why was that ?? Why did they use a sniper to kill an ex-military man while he was giving an interview? Why did the government authorize, EVER, the use of lethal force against the protesters? And *someone* did torch Central World (do you know how hard it is to set a building like that on fire?) - anyway, last time I was in BKK Central World was looking just fine, but 91 people are still dead - ohhhh, poor burning Bangkok, tears of a clown...

Cheers, Tom

Obviously Tom when the GOOD reds marched peacefully to Bangkok, they ignored their leaders' speeches that were riddled with violence. They didn't bring empty bottles or petrol; they didn't engage 300 'men in black'; they didn't steal weapons from the military and the police; they didn't threaten to burn Bangkok. They didn't take any advice from Mein Kampf and listen to speeches that offered no 'argumentation' only emotional manipulation in the time honoured fashion of fascist leaders, etc etc, boring etc. When Khun Abhisit offered an early election, they didn't accept because it wasn't soon enough. Or perhaps that offer was made in Jest. And when the famous military leader was targeted as a high profile sacrifice to the red movement, they rang Khun Abhisit and asked if he would kindly send a sniper in to blow his brains out. So kind of the then PM to oblige. Dear Tom, I must say to you that what you think you see is not what you get. You can fool some of the people some of the time but you can certainly fool the dispossessed all of the time. And if you get that right, then you can grab back the ownership of the country and do as you will. Or perhaps I'm just a cynic and the then PM was really out there pulling triggers? Somehow my intellectual reasoning thinks not!!

Edited by ianf
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I suspect that if he were any more of a mug, he would have a handle in the middle of his back.

Read this soft-soap interview with a touch of cynicism and his image becomes clearer;

His business folds due to the asian economic crisis - of course that can't be because of his failure to adapt, it must be the government's fault.

He is inspired by Thaksin, despite all the evidence that the man is corrupt - I wonder what he aspires to.

Doesn't want to be anybody's enemy, but gets sucked into the red shirt mess.

Becomes a "people's politician" and is rejected. No worries, get on the party list.

Is glad he joined the "fight for democracy" - probably will never see the light and realise he was used to get thaksin's cronies back into power.

Thinks Thaksin should be allowed to return because he has a lot to offer - whereas Thaksin wants to return because there is still a lot to take.

How about an interview with some REAL questions, like is corruption acceptable, why were armed militants allowed to mix with protesters, was it necessary to burn BKK ?

you guys are so funny.

The Drivel showers roses over the Dems and you people don't say squat, but if it is a piece about red shirt, suddenly you know how to "read critically".

maybe you should remember : in the financial crisis of the 90s a lot of companies went under - and it was primarily due to imposed conditions from the IMF which (and yeah, it's documented) made the situation worse. The Dem government in the 90s fell in due to extraordinary corruption. This guy runs out of the democratic strong-hold, how many PTP were elected in the south? But you imply he is a failure. He took a stand against a military coup which in his mind is a fight for democracy, but clearly not in your mind. Yay for TVF democracy. Sure he feels that Thaskin should come back - and other people feel that he shouldn't - but his right to an opinion is called "being used" by you. And let's just forget that it was the PAD who were the first "armed-militants" or that the protests last year were peaceful for over a month before the violence started. Let's forget that the PM Abhisit rejected the request to hold elections (which is what had to happen in the end anyway), and that 90+ people are now dead because of it. And let's forget that the government was the side doing the killing on a 10-1 scale - why was that ?? Why did they use a sniper to kill an ex-military man while he was giving an interview? Why did the government authorize, EVER, the use of lethal force against the protesters? And *someone* did torch Central World (do you know how hard it is to set a building like that on fire?) - anyway, last time I was in BKK Central World was looking just fine, but 91 people are still dead - ohhhh, poor burning Bangkok, tears of a clown...

Cheers, Tom

classic tom cant see the wood for the trees

they never fired the rpg,s or stormed the hospital either,and your insight into seh dang way out of line.

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Tom, after reading through all the above comments I think if only the westerners are allowed to vote in the last election, Ahbisit and the Democrats would have won the election hands down... so you don't have to explain until they understand...

Edited by chuang
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I suspect that if he were any more of a mug, he would have a handle in the middle of his back.

Read this soft-soap interview with a touch of cynicism and his image becomes clearer;

His business folds due to the asian economic crisis - of course that can't be because of his failure to adapt, it must be the government's fault.

He is inspired by Thaksin, despite all the evidence that the man is corrupt - I wonder what he aspires to.

Doesn't want to be anybody's enemy, but gets sucked into the red shirt mess.

Becomes a "people's politician" and is rejected. No worries, get on the party list.

Is glad he joined the "fight for democracy" - probably will never see the light and realise he was used to get thaksin's cronies back into power.

Thinks Thaksin should be allowed to return because he has a lot to offer - whereas Thaksin wants to return because there is still a lot to take.

How about an interview with some REAL questions, like is corruption acceptable, why were armed militants allowed to mix with protesters, was it necessary to burn BKK ?

you guys are so funny.

The Drivel showers roses over the Dems and you people don't say squat, but if it is a piece about red shirt, suddenly you know how to "read critically".

maybe you should remember : in the financial crisis of the 90s a lot of companies went under - and it was primarily due to imposed conditions from the IMF which (and yeah, it's documented) made the situation worse. The Dem government in the 90s fell in due to extraordinary corruption. This guy runs out of the democratic strong-hold, how many PTP were elected in the south? But you imply he is a failure. He took a stand against a military coup which in his mind is a fight for democracy, but clearly not in your mind. Yay for TVF democracy. Sure he feels that Thaskin should come back - and other people feel that he shouldn't - but his right to an opinion is called "being used" by you. And let's just forget that it was the PAD who were the first "armed-militants" or that the protests last year were peaceful for over a month before the violence started. Let's forget that the PM Abhisit rejected the request to hold elections (which is what had to happen in the end anyway), and that 90+ people are now dead because of it. And let's forget that the government was the side doing the killing on a 10-1 scale - why was that ?? Why did they use a sniper to kill an ex-military man while he was giving an interview? Why did the government authorize, EVER, the use of lethal force against the protesters? And *someone* did torch Central World (do you know how hard it is to set a building like that on fire?) - anyway, last time I was in BKK Central World was looking just fine, but 91 people are still dead - ohhhh, poor burning Bangkok, tears of a clown...

Cheers, Tom

So none of the governments after the coup were legitimate? Were you here for that election - Samak won for PPP, Then was replaced (unnecessarily) by Somchai, who lost majority when some MPs decided that they were unwilling to form a coalition with electoral cheats. This is a legitimate democratic process, forming an armed militia to overthrow the government is not "fighting for democracy," but he, and others, fail to see that.

The protests were peaceful for a month because the democrat coalition allowed them utmost tolerance. When they attempted a crowd dispersal, the army was attacked - the first casualties were the army commander and other officers. Were you here for that, or have you just forgotten?

You know who killed Seh Daeng - please share it with us.

Why did the government authorise lethal force by the army when they were being shot at, grenaded and killed?

Because YOU think it is hard to set a building alight, that means the red shirts couldn't have done it - are they too stupid? What about all the rhetoric from the leaders SPECIFICALLY about torching those buildings, and the farang idiot who made it on television just before the event.? Coincidence?

Yes a lot of people are dead, and it was planned that way by Thaksin as a way to discredit and besmirch the former government.

Cry your crocodile tears, there were enough real ones from the people of BKK who had their lives and livelihoods disrupted by these ignorant scum, but the supposedly educated farangs that suck up to them are worse.

I'd go through your comments bit by bit but it's not worth it - just one point ...

"ignorant scum" is a typical comment from you and others on the forum.

and it's BS

:bah::bah::bah::bah::bah:

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I suspect that if he were any more of a mug, he would have a handle in the middle of his back.

Read this soft-soap interview with a touch of cynicism and his image becomes clearer;

His business folds due to the asian economic crisis - of course that can't be because of his failure to adapt, it must be the government's fault.

He is inspired by Thaksin, despite all the evidence that the man is corrupt - I wonder what he aspires to.

Doesn't want to be anybody's enemy, but gets sucked into the red shirt mess.

Becomes a "people's politician" and is rejected. No worries, get on the party list.

Is glad he joined the "fight for democracy" - probably will never see the light and realise he was used to get thaksin's cronies back into power.

Thinks Thaksin should be allowed to return because he has a lot to offer - whereas Thaksin wants to return because there is still a lot to take.

How about an interview with some REAL questions, like is corruption acceptable, why were armed militants allowed to mix with protesters, was it necessary to burn BKK ?

you guys are so funny.

The Drivel showers roses over the Dems and you people don't say squat, but if it is a piece about red shirt, suddenly you know how to "read critically".

maybe you should remember : in the financial crisis of the 90s a lot of companies went under - and it was primarily due to imposed conditions from the IMF which (and yeah, it's documented) made the situation worse. The Dem government in the 90s fell in due to extraordinary corruption. This guy runs out of the democratic strong-hold, how many PTP were elected in the south? But you imply he is a failure. He took a stand against a military coup which in his mind is a fight for democracy, but clearly not in your mind. Yay for TVF democracy. Sure he feels that Thaskin should come back - and other people feel that he shouldn't - but his right to an opinion is called "being used" by you. And let's just forget that it was the PAD who were the first "armed-militants" or that the protests last year were peaceful for over a month before the violence started. Let's forget that the PM Abhisit rejected the request to hold elections (which is what had to happen in the end anyway), and that 90+ people are now dead because of it. And let's forget that the government was the side doing the killing on a 10-1 scale - why was that ?? Why did they use a sniper to kill an ex-military man while he was giving an interview? Why did the government authorize, EVER, the use of lethal force against the protesters? And *someone* did torch Central World (do you know how hard it is to set a building like that on fire?) - anyway, last time I was in BKK Central World was looking just fine, but 91 people are still dead - ohhhh, poor burning Bangkok, tears of a clown...

Cheers, Tom

Obviously Tom when the GOOD reds marched peacefully to Bangkok, they ignored their leaders' speeches that were riddled with violence. They didn't bring empty bottles or petrol; they didn't engage 300 'men in black'; they didn't steal weapons from the military and the police; they didn't threaten to burn Bangkok. They didn't take any advice from Mein Kampf and listen to speeches that offered no 'argumentation' only emotional manipulation in the time honoured fashion of fascist leaders, etc etc, boring etc. When Khun Abhisit offered an early election, they didn't accept because it wasn't soon enough. Or perhaps that offer was made in Jest. And when the famous military leader was targeted as a high profile sacrifice to the red movement, they rang Khun Abhisit and asked if he would kindly send a sniper in to blow his brains out. So kind of the then PM to oblige. Dear Tom, I must say to you that what you think you see is not what you get. You can fool some of the people some of the time but you can certainly fool the dispossessed all of the time. And if you get that right, then you can grab back the ownership of the country and do as you will. Or perhaps I'm just a cynic and the then PM was really out there pulling triggers? Somehow my intellectual reasoning thinks not!!

the constant references to hitler and mao on this forum are a joke.

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wow, pretty amazing for The Nation.

-------

It is nice to be able to read someone's story like this. Although just a quick peek into their history, none the less, it gives a glimpse of their personal history (engineering, business, politics, family) and into their political thoughts and motivations (disillusionment, democracy, support & action).

@kkvampire, as a university educated engineer & entrepreneur, I suspect that Kokaew is neither naive, nor stupid, not typical of the broader red-shirt population, nor anyone's minion. You may not agree with his ideas and politics, but he tells his own story here, and it is perfectly understandable to see how he came to where he is today.

Cheers - Tom

Obviously through his friendship with the scholar Jataporn..!

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If he reasoning to dumping the Dems and joining the reds is that

Chavalit left such a mess in '98 that the Dems couldn't clean it up quickly,

then he is nieve in the extreme.

The back bone of TRT, the reds parent organisation, was instrumental in

the collapse of the baht and touching off the Asian Tiger Crash regionally.

After the ignition, his was a regional financial catastrophe and not a Thailand only one,

so he blames the Dems for not over riding regional faults beyond any control

and lauds those who actually CAUSED the collapse.

Nieve is the least I can say for his rationalization.

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Tom, after reading through all the above comments I think if only the westerners are allowed to vote in the last election, Ahbisit and the Democrats would have won the election hands down... so you don't have to explain until they understand...

of course they would. And you're right about explaining...

but the constant haranguing, the insults, and the hyperbole - it bugs the sh*t out of me...

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"I had to lay off about 50 staff. That was very hard for me to do as they were like family."

I wonder if he can remember the names of any of these people who were like family to him. I have my doubts.

Something closer to the truth might perhaps be... "it was very hard for me as my family lost a decent source of income once generated by these poorly paid people'

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"I had to lay off about 50 staff. That was very hard for me to do as they were like family."

I wonder if he can remember the names of any of these people who were like family to him. I have my doubts.

Something closer to the truth might perhaps be... "it was very hard for me as my family lost a decent source of income once generated by these poorly paid people'

I think Thai governments have about as much control over the economy as they do over anything else in Thailand. That is to say, very little.

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So none of the governments after the coup were legitimate? Were you here for that election - Samak won for PPP, Then was replaced (unnecessarily) by Somchai, who lost majority when some MPs decided that they were unwilling to form a coalition with electoral cheats. This is a legitimate democratic process, forming an armed militia to overthrow the government is not "fighting for democracy," but he, and others, fail to see that.

Were the blockades of Government House and the country's airports part of this "legitimate democratic process?"

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