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Resentment boils at each delay in justice


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EDITORIAL

Resentment boils at each delay in justice
By The Nation

 

Shabby excuses and inexcusable leniency in the Vorayuth case are tearing at the social fabric

 

BANGKOK: -- Justified public outrage has greeted the latest delays in the legal prosecution of a wealthy young man from a prominent business family who ran over and killed a policeman with his luxury car in 2012.

 

Almost five years have passed since the tragedy and yet 31-year-old Vorayuth “Boss” Yoovidhya – grandson of the late Red Bull founder Chaleo Yoovidhya – is still walking free. Some of the charges laid against him have since expired due to statutes of limitation. The authorities have said they’ve failed thus far to bring him to justice because he claimed to be “too busy” or at other times “too ill” to report and acknowledge the charges. As was revealed in recent days, however, he’s been travelling constantly all this time, enjoying leisure trips and a lavish lifestyle overseas.

 

The public prosecutors last week postponed until April 27 a decision on whether to indict Vorayuth after his lawyer insisted he was somehow “preoccupied” in England. So now we have another public furore and familiar challenging questions for the authorities. Would Vorayuth be shown such leniency if he were an ordinary citizen without a fortune in the bank and a famous name? Would defendants under common circumstances be allowed to ignore summonses again and again and never be indicted? The call has gone out, just as familiar, for the authorities to consider the plight of the slain policeman’s family, who are far from rich. Vorayuth reportedly gave them a large sum of money by way of compensation, but that doesn’t see justice done. The police and prosecutors must remember the fundamental maxim “Justice delayed is justice denied.”

 

The case is of course widely seen as further proof that, in Thailand, rich people can and regularly do get away with serious violations of the law. To see justice so blatantly denied over and over for five years causes enormous frustration and dissatisfaction among the public. The resulting anger over the obvious social inequality can worsen divisions among different groups of citizens.

 

It’s easy enough to cite cases of wealthy and well-connected people buying their way out of legal problems while ordinary citizens often become scapegoats and are jailed for wrongdoings they did not commit. Then there are the cases in which charges against rich people do reach the courtroom, only for the defendants to flee the country rather than face imprisonment, although certainly they do not mind paying huge fines for minor offences.

 

Several prominent wealthy politicians have fled abroad to avoid punishment stemming from charges of corruption or abuse of power. We cannot forget a particularly galling case in which a major politician in exile claimed the court verdicts against him were politically motivated, then successfully sued his critics from overseas – which magically restored his faith in the Thai justice system.

 

Lax law enforcement is already a serious problem in our country. And many people feel law enforcement unfairly favours people who have the wherewithal to buy their way out of trouble. As long as such a predicament is allowed to continue, public dissatisfaction will keep simmering towards  boiling point and mistrust of the authorities will fester. 

 

We cannot afford to witness more and more cases proving the cynics right. The authorities have to address this problem before it gets dangerously out of hand. Supporters of political groups and politicians have often cited unfair treatment when they took to the streets to protest against the government. That same unfair treatment is routinely cited as a major reason for the political conflict that has continued for a decade.

 

We must not allow these feelings of frustration and dissatisfaction to spread throughout society and widen the perilous division further.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/news/opinion/today_editorial/30311444

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2017-04-06
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Face it, sadly, corruption is accepted as part of the culture.  All know it, accept it, abuse it, use it, and are hurt by it. 

 

Too many examples that show this is the way it is done it Siam.

 

The Law breakers, in robe or jeans will continue to thumb their noses at justice, because they can, they are entitled, they have the money, and they do and nothing happens.

 

It will died down as it always does...just sell papers these days.. Nothing in the sack...

 

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8 minutes ago, Rhys said:

Face it, sadly, corruption is accepted as part of the culture.  All know it, accept it, abuse it, use it, and are hurt by it. 

 

Too many examples that show this is the way it is done it Siam.

 

The Law breakers, in robe or jeans will continue to thumb their noses at justice, because they can, they are entitled, they have the money, and they do and nothing happens.

 

It will died down as it always does...just sell papers these days.. Nothing in the sack...

 

I am an Aussie living here on the goodwill of the govt of Thailand and my 7 year marriage to my Thai wife. It is true that I have seen and been a part of small "donations" to speed a few things through. I have read about but never seen widespread corruption. I am too far down the food chain. It does not bother me because I have witnessed the widespread and money grabbing activities of politicians in my own country. Not just small pink envelopes.... 

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Except that the case against the nameless politician was politically motivated, because many other powerful individuals guilty of much worse corruption than abuse of authority in a land sale have never been indicted or prosecuted. Interesting how you managed to slip that in there.

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3 hours ago, webfact said:

Shabby excuses and inexcusable leniency in the Vorayuth case are tearing at the social fabric

Damn right they are. Every Thai I know is as pissed off as the rest of us over these unacceptable delays.

They need to bring him in, charge him and put him through the courts without any further delay.

I would also want to see the case at court widely scrutinized, to ensure no under the table deals.

Justice is a concept that only actually works when it is fairly distributed to people from every avenue of life.

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3 hours ago, spiderorchid said:

I am an Aussie living here on the goodwill of the govt of Thailand and my 7 year marriage to my Thai wife. It is true that I have seen and been a part of small "donations" to speed a few things through. I have read about but never seen widespread corruption. I am too far down the food chain. It does not bother me because I have witnessed the widespread and money grabbing activities of politicians in my own country. Not just small pink envelopes.... 

You have "read about but never seen widespread corruption" yet admit you have been been "part of small donations to speed a few things through"?

Let me guess - they weren't bribes you paid, but 'facilitation payments'...

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All this faux outrage at this man being let off the hook because he failed to appear to acknowledge charges against him is laughable. Many of us know for a fact that anyone having been summonsed can simply pick up the 'phone and say they are unable to appear because they have a headache/sore tooth. In my case, eight bloody times before the judge advised to 'give them (the defendants) the case as it doesn't seem that they will appear at all and that it's simply a waste of time trying to get them to'. And as to Arrest Warrants, how many unenforced are they up to now? Last I looked it was 50,000.  Yes of course the fact this twerp is rich doesn't help matters. But let no one delude themselves that this anything out of the ordinary here. Tin pot little country.

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6 hours ago, webfact said:

So now we have another public furore and familiar challenging questions for the authorities. Would Vorayuth be shown such leniency if he were an ordinary citizen without a fortune in the bank and a famous name?

Hardly challenging.

 

The answer is NO.

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6 hours ago, webfact said:

The call has gone out, just as familiar, for the authorities to consider the plight of the slain policeman’s family, who are far from rich. Vorayuth reportedly gave them a large sum of money by way of compensation, but that doesn’t see justice done. The police and prosecutors must remember the fundamental maxim “Justice delayed is justice denied.”

 

Ah, but you are forgotten the maxim ''Everything is for sale"

 

Well, maybe not a maxim, more a reflection of reality.

Edited by Bluespunk
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2 hours ago, mtls2005 said:

But, but, but Thaksin....rank, decorations, passports.

 

Has Orachorn finished her 30 minutes of "community service"? Is she driving again?

 

Has Jenhop "recovered"?

 

Thai Justice. 

 

 

Has the errant abbot been arrested yet?   What was the outcome of the Phuket land official who died in custody in very suspiciuos circumstances?    Just examples of a couple more cases which have gone quiet.

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This is not good journalism. Where are the facts? Where is the public outrage? Just a made up story, fighting a losing battle.

 

Mostly it is by foreigners who refuse to accept the society in which they live!

 

MOST Thais are not outraged, they accept that there are over 100,000 people approx. in the country that are above the law, and guess what, they are OK with it!

 

Koh Tao, has been forgotten.

The Blue Diamond affair, has been forgotten, but not by the Saudis!

Anyone remember Duangchalerm, the son of the ex-deputy PM?

He allegedly shot a policeman, with 22 eye witnesses in a night club. Guess what, yes, he was aquuitted and is now a police officer! Are the Thai public in outrage - NO, they move on.

 

I suggest we do to and not believe this false news. Anyone who really thinks justice will be done or the Thais are outraged needs their head examined.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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When I read this headline about public resentment boiling over at injustice in Thailand, I thought it referred to  the autocracy under which the Thais have allowed themselves to live for the past three years.

 

Silly me! This anger of the Thais, which is allegedly 'tearing at the social fabric', is only directed at one dreadful rich guy who is only a small, symptomatic part in a much more awful and bigger clan and coterie of criminals. No groundswell of fury against that whole rotten-beyond-belief system. No, no. We must know our place and not utter a syllable of protest or even silently break the colour code in protest (especially if we are loyal Bangkokians). Must show our respect to our betters.

 

So still the Thais bend over again - and again - and again (oh, except if it's to do with a UFO monk or riding in the back of a pick-up truck). It's beginning to look like the old adage is true: 'people get the government they deserve'  ...

 

And yet, one cannot be fully human and not feel deep sadness and sympathy for the plight of numerous good and kind and sincere Thais who do indeed dislike the oppression - but for whatever reason have given their implicit consent to its continuance. I don't see anything changing anytime soon, however. A golden opportunity was recently handed the Thais - and they chose to back the System to the hilt - and in spades (if you will forgive my mixed metaphor). 

 

So sad. Very, VERY sad.

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8 hours ago, webfact said:

Would Vorayuth be shown such leniency if he were an ordinary citizen without a fortune in the bank and a famous name? Would defendants under common circumstances be allowed to ignore summonses again and again and never be indicted?

Why does this question even have to be asked?? The answer is so obvious. Prayuth with his big article 44 and all just avoids getting involved or making an statements in this case makes one wonder why??

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5 hours ago, darksidedog said:

Justice is a concept that only actually works when it is fairly distributed to people from every avenue of life.

My mind always gets stuck in neutral after the word concept. Then it wanders into concept cars maybe in this case a concept trial a show trial to show the world the power of "the Bosses money" It will all end badly either way for justice that is . 

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2 hours ago, DrTuner said:

Nation has improved in the last few months. I suppose a crackdown is inevitable.

Not necessarily, as they 'slipped in' the comment about Thaksin which will earn them a few brownie points.

 

5 hours ago, debate101 said:

Except that the case against the nameless politician was politically motivated, because many other powerful individuals guilty of much worse corruption than abuse of authority in a land sale have never been indicted or prosecuted. Interesting how you managed to slip that in there.

 

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10 hours ago, webfact said:

We must not allow these feelings of frustration and dissatisfaction to spread throughout society and widen the perilous division further.

Why not?

For society to otherwise submit and suppress its frustration and dissatisfaction is to concede its morality and ethical high ground. This becomes a status quo that is the standard of the elitist judicial control.

Instead, open an ocean of division in which the tsunami of demand for fair and equal justice swamps the foundation of elitist judicial security.

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