Jump to content

Thai police urged to stop parading suspects at press conferences


webfact

Recommended Posts

Police urged to stop parading suspects at press conferences
By Chularat Saengpassa
The Nation

 

baeb937f542368d9c8212f9bd3fad02f-sld.jpe

 

BANGKOK: -- IT IS NOT unusual for police to bring suspects in high-profile cases to press conferences, exposing them to the media and a barrage of cameras.

 

The practice has been so common that some people forget that the “suspect” has not been found guilty of any crime and revealing their identity constitutes a human rights violation.

 

“Please stop this practice. It violates the rights of suspects,” National Human Rights Commissioner Angkhana Neelaphaijit said.

 

She said the practice was especially sensitive in human-trafficking cases, where questions posed to alleged victims should be done behind closed doors by a multidisciplinary team.

 

“It’s very worrying that in high-profile flesh trade cases, senior policemen have brought suspects and victims to press conferences,” Angkhana said.

 

She said her agency planned to investigate related human rights violations.

 

“Don’t forget that suspects are considered innocent until proven guilty,” she said.

 

Deputy National Police Commissioner Pol General Srivara Ransibrahmanakul has recently been present at press conferences alongside suspects in a much-publicised child-prostitution scandal. Even the mother of a girl who was allegedly coerced into the flesh trade has been present. While there, suspects and others involved in the case had to answer questions posed by reporters.

 

The abuse of accused people’s rights continues even though Prime Minister and National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) chief General Prayut Chan-o-cha has ordered police not to bring suspects to press conferences.

 

Moreover, a National Police Office order prohibits police from bringing suspects, alleged victims or witnesses to press conferences, except in cases where their presence was considered useful to the public and supervisors had given permission.

 

Regardless, those orders have been largely ignored.

 

Suspects whose names are later cleared after legal proceedings will find it difficult to reintegrate into society because members of the public may remember their faces, but will not know that they had been acquitted as the media does not report every acquittal verdict.

 

Even people who are convicted of a crime and have served their punishment are often remembered as criminals because of the media coverage, making it difficult for them to return to normal roles in society.

 

Many reporters welcome press conferences with the presentation of suspects, but most are aware they are violating a suspect’s human rights. However, press conferences make it easier for reporters to access information needed to do their jobs while some also believe the events give suspects a chance to present their side of a story.

 

“In cases in which the suspects are really innocent, their access to reporters will give them a chance to talk to the public and to make their voices heard,” one reporter said.

 

Another reporter said the presentation of suspects’ faces could be really useful to the public. “They [members of the public] can better protect themselves,” he said.

 

Many reporters support the protection of suspects’ human rights and have said that there are other channels to bring justice to scapegoats in criminal cases and protect members of the public. “There is no need to present suspects at police press conferences,” another reporter said.

 

At present, the Department of Special Investigation’s press conferences exclude the appearance of suspects.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/news/national/30314929

 
thenation_logo.jpg
-- © Copyright The Nation 2017-05-12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Suspects are innocent until proven guilty .

The BIB are not bothered about that, only want the photo taken, ohh look at me doing my job.

When they parade suspects, you will notice it is mainly senior officers in the photos, not the actual officers who did the work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, webfact said:

Suspects whose names are later cleared after legal proceedings will find it difficult to reintegrate into society because members of the public may remember their faces, but will not know that they had been acquitted as the media does not report every acquittal verdict.

 

The media actually don't report from court at all, apart from very big cases, so very few acquittals are reported.

I have seen many people over the years have their name and photo plastered on the papers and then be found not guilty, but continue to be harassed by others who don't know the verdict.

And as for the police, if they spent half as much time actually doing police work as they do preening themselves for the conference, crime rates would plummet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

'except in cases where their presence was considered useful to the public and supervisors had given permission'

 

Well, they won't be stopping anyway, but at least they have an excuse. 

 

Reminds me of my old job here. We used to have 'meetings'. Someone would have a big sign made up in a printing shop with a meaningless slogan like "work together for the better future". We'd have coffee and biscuits, chat, take pics and sometimes have someone from a newspaper or internet website come in for  pictures. At first I went a long with it until I realised it was just a big show. Meaningless. I started to avoid whenever I could after that. 

 

Narcissism; it will be the end of us all. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, ezzra said:

Can you imagine all those big brass standing there in their full uniforms

 with no suspect in sight to photo opp with? not the same......

even half or most of the suspects you cant tell if they are human or ape's.

face covered,heavy clothing ect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, jaltsc said:

“Don’t forget that suspects are considered innocent until proven guilty,” she said.

 

What fairyland is she living in?

She's trying to do the right thing and defend human rights here in Thailand, which also happens to be her job. Your cynicism doesn't really help. But then you are probably from Utopia and scoff at the attempts of people to improve things here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Police use enactments of crimes,even telling the suspects what to do,

as it means,they don't have to spend much time on doing any real investigations,

show video to the court,must be guilty.job done.

regards worgeordie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, colinneil said:

Suspects are innocent until proven guilty .

The BIB are not bothered about that, only want the photo taken, ohh look at me doing my job.

When they parade suspects, you will notice it is mainly senior officers in the photos, not the actual officers who did the work.

 

A different point, police who are trained investigators know how to structure, strategize their questions, put them in a certain order and often this will bring responses which generate deeper details, clues, trick the suspect into revealing valuable points etc., etc.

 

Surely letting the media jump in at the start of the inquiry with uncontrolled questions could destroy all of the above?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thought the good general banned this parading of suspects last year.  he is about as effective as the last government.

they should be getting rid of the public reenactments first where the cop walks a suspect through what they are believed to have done. then photos are taken to show in a court room. hardly leads to a fair trial.

Edited by williamgeorgeallen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

These photo Ops are a waste of time. They are for the benefit of the Police, so they can show the public they do something 

because they have earned a reputation of doing nothing. It really is time consuming and takes away from what they should be doing.

For example, a drug dealer turns himself in because a warrant for him was issued 5 years ago. The police have not bothered to look for this guy although he lives 1/2 kilometer from the police station. So the desk police officer sends out a message to all his bosses

that a photo Op will take place at 2PM today because "we" caught a 5 year drug fugitive.Another message is sent to the local media.

Well, everyone stops what they were doing and returns at 1:30PM for the photo Op. One officer was collecting Tea Money and had stop and return to the station. The commander was having a nice lunch with his second wife. Another officer was having a drink with

some village chiefs. So, you see everything comes to a stop for the 2PM photo Op. A waster of time.Amazing Thailand.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, webfact said:

Another reporter said the presentation of suspects’ faces could be really useful to the public. “They [members of the public] can better protect themselves,” he said.

Protect themselves from whom? No one has been found guilty of anything, that's the point of all this. This reporter's implicit presumption of guilt demonstrates exactly why this behavior must stop. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, williamgeorgeallen said:

thought the good general banned this parading of suspects last year.  he is about as effective as the last government.

 

Yeap, some googling shows Sep 16 news reports that go like below.   Maybe the police are not considered officials?  Maybe the police didn't get the memo?   Yea, I'm digging for the reason.  :ph34r:

Quote

 

BANGKOK: The National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission (NBTC) are to enforce a prohibition on TV news broadcasts showing criminal suspects because it is a violation of civil rights, said deputy permanent secretary for justice Tawatchai Thaikiew.
 

The move followed Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha’s order prohibiting officials from parading suspects in line with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

 


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, colinneil said:

Suspects are innocent until proven guilty .

The BIB are not bothered about that, only want the photo taken, ohh look at me doing my job.

When they parade suspects, you will notice it is mainly senior officers in the photos, not the actual officers who did the work.

Senior officers, you mean the Lt Colonels, Lt Generals and Major Generals :cheesy::cheesy:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Thechook said:

The police just love photo ops it gives them a chance to polish those parachute wings and show them off along with all their medals.

Yes, they have had too much influence watching the old Duke and Prince Charles. Jokes, the lot of them.:cheesy:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, jaltsc said:

“Don’t forget that suspects are considered innocent until proven guilty,” she said.

 

What fairyland is she living in?

They should be.

And after a confession the police should still be able to find proof.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In Thailand you are guilty until proven innocent ( if the police even bother to investigate )  The press conference and subsequent re enactment seals the suspects fate even if they are innocent. 

I remember seeing the coverage of the re-enactment of the Koh Tao murders where the 2 suspects quite clearly were told and shown what to do , they were prompted by the police in front of the cameras  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, the Americans like to do the "perp walk" too, which amounts to almost the same thing except there is more humiliation as the defendant is inevitably in some sort of prison garb and often handcuffed/chained or something like that so that they walk strangely.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.






×
×
  • Create New...