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Young doctor, known online for his fight against cancer, dies


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Dr Krittai Tanasombatkul, a doctor at the Clinical Epidemiology and Clinical Statics Department at the Faculty of Medicine of Chiang Mai University, who publicly announced that he had terminal lung cancer on his “Soo Deewa” (Let’s Fight) web page on November 10 last year, died today at 10.59am.

 

The death of the 29-year-old was announced by his father Thaipatara in his Facebook post, featuring an image of Krittai with a short message which reads “Have a safe journey, my son”. In response to the tragic news, many people have expressed condolences to Krittai’s family.

 

On November 2, Dr Krittai posted a message on his web page saying that he may not survive much longer and expected to pass on next month, adding that anyone who wanted to say something to him should do so.

 

Caption: File photo : Dr Krittai Tanasombatkul

 

Full story: Thai PBS 2023-12-05

 

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"despite exercising regularly, to raise public awareness of the disease."

What does exercising have to do with treating cancer as this statement seems to imply?

Types of Treatment

  • Surgery. An operation where doctors cut out cancer tissue.
  • Chemotherapy. Using special medicines to shrink or kill the cancer. ...
  • Radiation therapy. Using high-energy rays (similar to X-rays) to kill the cancer.
  • Targeted therapy. Using drugs to block the growth and spread of cancer cells.

https://www.cdc.gov › basic_info

Must be more the this story than air pollution.

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It's a given Chiang Mai's air quality was a contributing factor in the young man's lung cancer. Statistically, a smoker is 20 times more likely to develop the disease than a non-smoker.

Smoke is smoke, it doesn't matter whether it comes from a cigarette, or burning rice and corn fields.

I am wondering if the Thai MOPH is sitting on lung disease data, the air quality issue seems to fly under the radar.

RIP a brave young man, taken too early.

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27 minutes ago, Srikcir said:

"despite exercising regularly, to raise public awareness of the disease."

What does exercising have to do with treating cancer as this statement seems to imply?

Types of Treatment

  • Surgery. An operation where doctors cut out cancer tissue.
  • Chemotherapy. Using special medicines to shrink or kill the cancer. ...
  • Radiation therapy. Using high-energy rays (similar to X-rays) to kill the cancer.
  • Targeted therapy. Using drugs to block the growth and spread of cancer cells.

https://www.cdc.gov › basic_info

Must be more the this story than air pollution.

image.png

Exercise does not treat cancer. Having said that, exercise and one's general fitness level is significant in assisting recovery from surgery and other forms of treatment.

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10 minutes ago, Peterphuket said:

Recently, I read in a newspaper that one in two people get cancer in their lifetime.

Many moons ago, I was at a conference where one of the speakers said cancer was statistically unavoidable if the human life span could be extended to 120 years.

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5 hours ago, Lacessit said:

surgery and other forms of treatment.

I talked to a couple of oncolongists about probable cause of death related to this young doctor. It's likely the lung cancer (cause unknown but definitely not from Thailand air pollution) spread by blood to the brain. Significant surgery and/or radiation in the brain is not advised.

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51 minutes ago, Srikcir said:

I talked to a couple of oncolongists about probable cause of death related to this young doctor. It's likely the lung cancer (cause unknown but definitely not from Thailand air pollution) spread by blood to the brain. Significant surgery and/or radiation in the brain is not advised.

You are using the same argument employed by the tobacco industry for quite a few decades. If the cause is unknown, how can Thailand air pollution be totally ruled out? That's a dumb statement.

Statistics don't lie when it is a 20:1 ratio. Smoke is smoke, whether it comes from a cigarette or air pollution.

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13 minutes ago, Srikcir said:

Smoke in the lungs does NOT cause cancer from which the doctor died. Stay focused please.

How can you possibly know that?

The lung cancer death rate in Thailand is 32 per 100,000. The death rate for lung cancer in Malaysia is less than 20 per 100,000.

Everyone sees all types of vehicles in Thailand belching smoke. That is why there is so much air pollution. Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai hit an AQI of 500 during the smoke season, when the WHO standard for good air quality is 50.

In contrast, one never sees smoke from vehicles in Malaysia. Currently, AQI in Kuala Lumpur is 45. Population 8.6 million.  In Chiang Mai, it is 75. Population 1.2 million. Draw your own conclusions.

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Very rare a young man dies of lung cancer.  Was he a heavy smoker in his youth?  Did he grow up in the jungle area and was close to the burning?  Would be interesting to know what he was exposed to. 
 

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7 hours ago, balo said:

Very rare a young man dies of lung cancer.  Was he a heavy smoker in his youth?  Did he grow up in the jungle area and was close to the burning?  Would be interesting to know what he was exposed to. 
 

He was what is called a statistical outlier.  He was dealt a bad hand when it cames to genetics, exposure, or both.

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On 12/6/2023 at 7:54 AM, klauskunkel said:

a young doctor with lung cancer in Chiang Mai... any correlation with the yearly burning seasons?

 

I don't know that there's any way to definitively establish what caused his individual lung cancer...

 

But... the link between air pollution and premature fatality, including from lung cancer, is definitely there:

 

"State Of Global Air reported that in 2019, over 32,000 deaths in Thailand were attributable to ambient particulate matter pollution (PM2.5). While more recent data is yet to be released, the trend is upward, and it’s very likely that in 2023, even more deaths will be attributable to air pollution."

 

"According to health authorities in the country, more than 1.3 million people have already suffered from air pollution-related diseases in 2023. What makes this stat particularly staggering is that this data was published near the end of March – only three months into the year."

 

https://breathesafeair.com/air-pollution-in-thailand/#Health_Effects_of_Air_Pollution

 

Edited by TallGuyJohninBKK
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