Jump to content

Controls on political parties may stay in lead-up to next election, says Prawit


rooster59

Recommended Posts

Controls on political parties may stay in lead-up to next election, says Prawit

By THE NATION

 

a1189a0fa551e32a5c5c1c257c2bcb45.jpeg

Prawit

 

TIGHT CONTROLS on political parties and activities – that have been in place since the 2014 coup – may not be lifted even after the four organic laws required to hold the next election are completed.

 

Deputy Prime Minister and Defence Minister General Prawit Wongsuwan said the controls might stay in place because the country’s political situation has not yet settled down.

 

The government had been expected to relax the controls after the promulgation of the new Constitution, to allow political parties and politicians to campaign ahead of the next election, which is expected to take place by November 2018.

 

However, Prawit suggested that it would take more time before the rule would be relaxed.

 
“Things are still not alright now. We want more time and we want all the parties to help. Do not make trouble or it will be more difficult for us to make a decision,” he told reporters.

 

“I’m responsible for security issues. I need time to work on this and everyone should cooperate with us too,” he said. “It’s not going to work if things are stirred up like this.”

 

When asked if the restrictions would be relaxed after the necessary organic laws are passed, Prawit said that would be decided in the future and that he did not know yet.

 

He said the government was focusing on ensuring safety for the people and solving conflicts in the country to achieve national reconciliation.

 

After the coup in May 2014, the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) issued Order Number 7/2014 prohibiting political gatherings of five people or more, which in effect bans meetings by political parties. The order, which is treated as a law, was enacted amid unsettling deals among political fronts. It is still in effect.

 

Article 265 of the new 2017 Constitution, promulgated on Thursday, authorises the NCPO to remain in power until an elected government is formed and allows all of its orders to remain in force. Repeal of such an order is required to be done through an Act, according to a clause in the new Constitution.

 

Prawit stressed yesterday that the NCPO did not plan to back down on its orders, including those granted under Article 44 of the interim charter. 

 

Meanwhile, Constitution Drafting Commission chairman Meechai Ruchuphan yesterday said implementation of Article 44 should be done more cautiously in a way that would not go against the new charter.

 

In a related development, international credit rating agency Moody’s Investors Service said political risk in Thailand has not changed much after new constitution. 

 

A statement issued by Moody’s said that promulgation of the new charter represents a step towards normalisation, but political risk has not materially changed given the uncertainties related to the processes required to hold an election.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/news/national/30311687

 

 
thenation_logo.jpg
-- © Copyright The Nation 2017-04-08
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would be far easier if the Junta just came out and said what they really mean.

"We have all the power, we are keeping it, for as long as we god damned please, and we will throw you in jail if you make a fuss."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, MaxLee said:

:cheesy::cheesy::cheesy::cheesy: There will never be an election :cheesy::cheesy::cheesy::cheesy:

I disagree, I'm sure that the Thai people will eventually be allowed to vote for a puppet of the juntas choice once all opposition has been incarcerated.  :thumbsup:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would be far easier if the Junta just came out and said what they really mean.
"We have all the power, we are keeping it, for as long as we god damned please, and we will throw you in jail if you make a fuss."

I think that is clearly understood by everybody. That's why they don't "make​ a fuss".
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Only thing now should be for all the parties to simply refuse to stand for any election under such intolerable conditions. The sad thing is, they won't, so I really do not have a great deal of sympathy. 

You know that expression 'Nobody else gives a crap so why should I'?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, darksidedog said:

It would be far easier if the Junta just came out and said what they really mean.

"We have all the power, we are keeping it, for as long as we god damned please, and we will throw you in jail if you make a fuss."

 

Well that's your opinion which your of course entitled to, there could of course be other points of view and possibly with good reasons.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Controls on any or all parties in the run up to an election will result in more conflict. If parties cannot canvass for support and be provided with a level playing field to go head to head with the junta in an election. Then just do the tax payer a favour and dont have an election as the public will be short changed with a biased result. And some may be quite angry after being so patient for the past few years. And who could blame them? 

 

Could this statement be an admission that the juntas hearts and mind campaign has come to a shudding halt and they are now worried about being booted out? Only time will tell.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We need more time to top up our offshore bank accounts. Therefore road fuels and alcohol will have tax increases. We must top up the reserves which have been depleted for some unkown reason. Enabling us to transfer funds to our accounts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, rooster59 said:

In a related development, international credit rating agency Moody’s Investors Service said political risk in Thailand has not changed much after new constitution. 

Perhaps those who discuss things in financial terms will have better luck reasoning with the junta.   Legalities, decency and examples of good governance are lost on them. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, rooster59 said:

Deputy Prime Minister and Defence Minister General Prawit Wongsuwan said the controls might stay in place because the country’s political situation has not yet settled down.

?????? Really where is the problem. He always has that "the cat swallowed the canary" look on his face. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Godang said:

We need more time to top up our offshore bank accounts. Therefore road fuels and alcohol will have tax increases. We must top up the reserves which have been depleted for some unkown reason. Enabling us to transfer funds to our accounts.

As the song goes "Hey big spender" do these guys have a clue as how to handle money especially money that belongs to the people? They all act like past winners in the world Monopoly championships. While we are on the subject I think its time the schools had better economical courses the world not just Thailand is over run with Monetary Morons. Here they seem to hold the reigns of power. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An election without political gatherings or campaigning. 

 

When (if) there is an election it will be under conditions similar to the sham referendum that 'approved' the constitution--the junta campaigns for their chosen outcome with a massive, taxpayer funded propaganda blitz, possibly sending people in uniform door-to-door to 'inform' people of the correct choice.  Other parties will not be allowed to campaign, and there will be no 'impolite' criticism of the junta's preferred outcome.  Of course there will be no need for independent monitoring of the vote or vote count.  At the end they will declare that Thailand is once again a democracy.

Edited by heybruce
Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, heybruce said:

An election without political gatherings or campaigning. 

 

When (if) there is an election it will be under conditions similar to the sham referendum that 'approved' the constitution--the junta campaigns for their chosen outcome with a massive, taxpayer funded propaganda blitz, possibly sending people in uniform door-to-door to 'inform' people of the correct choice.  Other parties will not be allowed to campaign, and there will be no 'impolite' criticism of the junta's preferred outcome.  Of course there will be no need for independent monitoring of the vote or vote count.  At the end they will declare that Thailand is once again a democracy.

Hollow victory. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, heybruce said:

An election without political gatherings or campaigning. 

 

When (if) there is an election it will be under conditions similar to the sham referendum that 'approved' the constitution--the junta campaigns for their chosen outcome with a massive, taxpayer funded propaganda blitz, possibly sending people in uniform door-to-door to 'inform' people of the correct choice.  Other parties will not be allowed to campaign, and there will be no 'impolite' criticism of the junta's preferred outcome.  Of course there will be no need for independent monitoring of the vote or vote count.  At the end they will declare that Thailand is once again a democracy.

 

Oh the irony.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 “It’s not going to work if things are stirred up like this.”

 

Wanting the right to campaign ahead of an election? I wouldn't describe that as stirring things up. These jokers aren't ever going to release their hold on power, that's as plain as the nose on Prawit's fat face.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, scorecard said:

 

No need, as obvious as the roseacia on your nose on your face.

Come on now say it in a nicer way a picture is worth a thousand words. What is a roseacia. I used to have a g/f by the name of Rosita when I lived in Mexico. 

 

images (1).jpg

images (1).jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, heybruce said:

Junta fanboys are becoming scarce, but there is still one. He feels obligated to post, even though he obviously has nothing to say.  He also is unclear on the definition of "irony".

No mention of the main colour of the Chinese flag or the name of a bone in the lower part of the leg were made, so yes they are thin on the ground. They tend to be one trick ponies after all...

Edited by baboon
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, scorecard said:

 

No need, as obvious as the roseacia on your nose on your face.

And the fact that you've got nothing to substantiate your claim is as obvious as your less than stellar intellect. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/8/2017 at 0:10 PM, harada said:

I disagree, I'm sure that the Thai people will eventually be allowed to vote for a puppet of the juntas choice once all opposition has been incarcerated.  :thumbsup:

 

That can take 4ever, because the spirit of the red opposition never dies,.......:cheesy::cheesy:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.






×
×
  • Create New...