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Fleeing heir puts Red Bull’s future on the line


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EDITORIAL

Fleeing heir puts Red Bull’s future on the line
By The Nation

 

Few countries share Thailand’s tolerance for wealthy suspects evading justice

 

BANGKOK: -- Being a Thai company fully exposed to the Western market and mores, Red Bull must realise there are possible commercial consequences stemming from Vorayuth Yoovidhya’s flight from the law. Accused of a fatal hit and run in Bangkok, the son of its patriarch only made matters worse last week when he again failed to show up for an appointment with prosecutors and instead went into hiding.

 

Red Bull is a major, internationally recognised brand, but its reputation is now imperilled by a situation that ought to have been resolved years ago. The firm would be making a mistake if it assumes calls for a boycott of the “energy drink” and the racing events it sponsors will recede away. Public fury over high-profile crimes like this often fades with time in Thailand, but that doesn’t happen in the West, including most countries where Red Bull is marketed.

 

The company cannot count on Thai forgetfulness manifesting abroad. It’s common for Thai suspects to flee legal action and later re-emerge to pursue comfortable lives as if nothing had ever happened. Corporations don’t consider their executives’ wrongdoings to represent commercial setbacks. Conviction for insider trading needn’t hurt the employer’s profits. When the children of wealthy and well-connected people are involved in fatal accidents, the default ploy is to lay low until the social storm has passed. 

 

There are good Thai characteristics and bad Western ones. Yet the undue privilege granted people holding high social or commercial status is this country’s undisputed national shame. True “equality” has little to do with whether ordinary people can choose senators, but it is demonstrated through our day-to-day judicial process. The Red Bull suspect is apparently exploiting social weaknesses in his homeland and hoping the same phenomena shield him elsewhere.

 

Vorayuth reportedly fled the country on his private jet three days before a warrant was belatedly issued for his arrest, nearly five years after he allegedly knocked down, dragged and killed a Bangkok policeman and then drove away from the scene without stopping.

Bringing him to justice is a must. Perhaps the net is tightening now that his passport has been revoked. His capture would go a long way towards erasing the perception that the rich are above the law. Far too often the authorities have been accused of letting influential suspects off the hook, and that is what Vorayuth’s unhampered passage through Immigration suggests as well.

 

Still, the scrutiny that law enforcement undergoes locally is nothing compared to what will happen if the accused is spotted at a Red Bull event overseas. The resulting outcry would be directed not at the Thai authorities but the company. If Red Bull is not motivated by conscience in this matter, it should be aware of the likely commercial fallout. Nor does it appear that Vorayuth will inherit the business empire if his legal woes aren’t settled first.

 

Red Bull should remember that what’s at stake isn’t just a young man’s future, but also that of a company whose international reputation took a long time to build. 

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/news/opinion/today_editorial/30314654

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2017-05-09
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"Bringing him to justice is a must... His capture would go a long way towards erasing the perception that the rich are above the law."

 

If this starts a trend to bring all of the High Sos who have committed crimes to justice, they won't be able to build prisons fast enough.

 

However, this is Thailand, where they live by the golden rule. He with the gold rules. Don't hold your breath waiting for justice to prevail.

Edited by jaltsc
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I hope his families cavalier attitude towards the law is their undoing.

We are hi-so so f...  u, happens too many times here.

The authorities here  have allowed this nonsense to happen, because people are too busy accepting bribes, rather than upholding the law.

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RedBull is not a Thai company. Austrian entrepreneur Dietrich Mateschitz was inspired by an existing energy drink named Krating Daeng, which was first introduced and sold in Thailand by Chaleo Yoovidhya.

 

So how does RedBull or Dietrich Mateschitz become responsible for the actions of the grandson. Dietrich licensed the product from Chaleo and made it a worldwide success?

 

This is nothing to do with RedBull or Dietrich Mateschitz but everything to do with the government here who let off rich people.

 

This is like the FB stories of Mercedes and Ferrari not letting Redbull F1 having their engines due to the actions of this Thai driver. Fact is Redbull have always used Renault engines and in 2017 under the TAG sponsorship banner. The reason that both Mercedes and Ferrari will not let Redbull have their engines is a guy called Adrian Newey who is the worlds no 1 designer of F1 cars and that is a fact.

 

So look closer to home for excuses please.

Edited by wakeupplease
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One pitiful and filthy rich boy put the whole Thai justice to shame and

mockery.. it is his money that prevent the authorities to treat him

like the criminal that he is? you  bet ya....

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Just so typically coward of him not to think of anyone but himself......but at least he's made the world notice how lop-sided the Thai justice system is:)

Maybe mummy can persuade him to do the right thing......but the loss of face may be too much!

Anyway....the RB company must have something to say....

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A boycott of Red Bull is highly unlikely. Tax dodging companies like Google and Starbucks continue to thrive regardless. Major cities in the West are awash with cash from money laundering spent on high end property. London is the prime example.

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1 hour ago, wakeupplease said:

RedBull is not a Thai company. Austrian entrepreneur Dietrich Mateschitz was inspired by an existing energy drink named Krating Daeng, which was first introduced and sold in Thailand by Chaleo Yoovidhya.

 

So how does RedBull or Dietrich Mateschitz become responsible for the actions of the grandson. Dietrich licensed the product from Chaleo and made it a worldwide success?

 

This is nothing to do with RedBull or Dietrich Mateschitz but everything to do with the government here who let off rich people.

 

This is like the FB stories of Mercedes and Ferrari not letting Redbull F1 having their engines due to the actions of this Thai driver. Fact is Redbull have always used Renault engines and in 2017 under the TAG sponsorship banner. The reason that both Mercedes and Ferrari will not let Redbull have their engines is a guy called Adrian Newey who is the worlds no 1 designer of F1 cars and that is a fact.

 

So look closer to home for excuses please.

Get your fact straight before posting bullshit:

"Red Bull GmbH is headquartered in Fuschl am See, an Austrian village of about 1,500 inhabitants near Salzburg. The company is 51 percent controlled by the Yoovidhya family who, for technical reasons, own the trademark in Europe and the US."

 

Wikipedia

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the drama may  help the redbull name, he writes a book,,a new ''RED BULL line of mens clothes,a mens fragrance ''RED BULL FOR MEN'',the movie deal. ,.sometimes life is unfair...NO, life is never fair..

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30 minutes ago, zakk9 said:

Get your fact straight before posting bullshit:

"Red Bull GmbH is headquartered in Fuschl am See, an Austrian village of about 1,500 inhabitants near Salzburg. The company is 51 percent controlled by the Yoovidhya family who, for technical reasons, own the trademark in Europe and the US."

 

Wikipedia

Go check your Wikipedia set up and facts you can edit this yourself if you want to so not fact.

 

But here is the problem look at home b4 blaming others for lame ducks which is done often from some countries.

 

Wikipedia is not the gospel but if you believe it is, then do some research and you will find out it will not be accepted in a court of law.

 

Next thing I hear you say its all Ferrari's fault for selling him the car, along with PTT for selling him the petrol to fuel it along with the tyre company for the tyres on it. He is the villian along with those in government who let him get away, but if it makes you happy blame me also. Some People?

Edited by wakeupplease
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Does anyone really think there will be justice?

20 years in the Bangkok Hilton?? I think not!

Look forward to community service order (which won't really happen) at the most.

Just look at the other rich scumbags in recent events.

Or all the bent cops.

 

Thailand is the land of selective justice.!!!!

And remember. Money number one.....

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2 hours ago, webfact said:

Bringing him to justice is a must. Perhaps the net is tightening now that his passport has been revoked. His capture would go a long way towards erasing the perception that the rich are above the law. Far too often the authorities have been accused of letting influential suspects off the hook, and that is what Vorayuth’s unhampered passage through Immigration suggests as well.

 

"Bringing him to justice is a must."

 

Why? What makes this case so different to all the other influential people who have evaded the Thai justice system?

 

Someone mentioned earlier Red Bull should not be held to blame for this little scrot's flight. Absolutely correct! But the Thai justice system needs to have a close look in the mirror and have a quiet word with itself to stop allowing people like this to walk through the massive 'excuse' loopholes that are blatantly apparent for the rich & famous of this country in the current system.

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Quote

 It’s common for Thai suspects to flee legal action and later re-emerge to pursue comfortable lives as if nothing had ever happened.

 

Blame this on the Thai justice system which only selectively punishes the rich.   Had to strike out the word "justice" because it's not the appropriate or deserved word for the Thai legal system....not sure what the appropriate word(s) would be.  Maybe just the word injustice.

 

I expect the killer's family is still amazed there is still so much interest in bringing the killer to justice.   Oh well, he'll just have to stay out of Thailand longer than normal...just allow a longer period for this to all blow over....be forgotten.

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This to shall pass! Most people don't care and it will be forgotten in no time.

He is "Home Free" , 5 years to plan, and he has everything he will ever need youth, health and MONEY. What else could you ask for!

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32 minutes ago, wakeupplease said:

Go check your Wikipedia set up and facts you can edit this yourself if you want to so not fact.

 

But here is the problem look at home b4 blaming others for lame ducks which is done often from some countries.

 

Wikipedia is not the gospel but if you believe it is, then do some research and you will find out it will not be accepted in a court of law.

 

Next thing I hear you say its all Ferrari's fault for selling him the car, along with PTT for selling him the petrol to fuel it along with the tyre company for the tyres on it. He is the villian along with those in government who let him get away, but if it makes you happy blame me also. Some People?

Oh dear. So because it's on Wikipedia, it must be a lie then? The fact i that the Yoovidhya family owns a controlling part of the company, they own the production and mostly the trademark. Dietrich Mateschitz's contribution is the worldwide marketing and PR which of course is the lifeline of the brand, but that doesn't change the financial situation.

 

Another fact is that Cavallino Motors Co., Ltd., the Ferrari distributor in Thailand, is owned by the Yoovidhya family and Boonrawd Brewery in partnership. The chairman of the company is Mr. Vudha Bhirombhakdi, Vice Chairman of Boonrawd Brewery. The president of the company is Mr. Chalerm Yoovidhya (the kid's grandfather), CEO and Chairman of Siam Winery and Red Bull UK and Thailand. No, that doesn't place any guilt on Ferrari, but it shows how rich kids can get away with anything under protection by business empires that include "reputable brands", like Red Bull, Ferrari and to some extension Singha.

Edited by zakk9
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Rich Thai's think they are untouchable. It's part of Thai Culture or I should say the bad side of Thai Culture. I see

the poor doing their time because they don't have money or influence. The police are more than happy to protect the wealthy as long as envelopes keep switching hands. You can buy protection in Thailand very easily. It's time for Thai People to stand up and require

equality for all, otherwise, Thailand will be the laughing stock of the world.

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come on get real, he only killed one cop, got another 8 to go then he can walk free.  best thing was he was living in Thailand and immigration let him leave, so that is where an inquiry needs to be started . do they qualify for inactive posts i wonder sounds like heaven to me

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