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Installing Water Tank in Ground


carlyai

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I'm putting an aquaponics sump tank in the ground. I was going to build a concrete structure in the ground and drop in a 1000 L IBC TOT container.

I have since been thinking of sourcing a ready made good grade tank, digging the hole, and putting that in the ground for the sump tank.

I saw the tank in the picture at Global House and thought that could be OK, but staff said it's for above ground, not in ground. The tank manufacturer has not responded to email.

So the question is, why can't I put this tank in the ground? It looks strong enough. 

20210115_143545.jpg

20210115_143530.jpg

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1 minute ago, lopburi3 said:

Tanks float.  Not good when contained water runs low and ground water is high.  

That's correct, in some cases. 

Change to septic tank and ask Global experts that question 😉

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12 minutes ago, Artisi said:

That's correct, in some cases. 

Change to septic tank and ask Global experts that question 😉

I was thinking about a septic tank and pulling the gizzards out of it.

 

The tank would always be near full as it's a sump tank for an aquaponic system.

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How much water will there be in the tank under normal circumstances?

 

I would certainly look at adapting a septic tank as these are at least intended to be buried, but they could still pop-up if empty and ground water high.

 

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1 minute ago, Crossy said:

How much water will there be in the tank under normal circumstances?

 

I would certainly look at adapting a septic tank as these are at least intended to be buried, but they could still pop-up if empty and ground water high.

 

Normally it would be full all the time. No ground water that I noticed when I built the pool which has a 2 m deep end and dug down another 400 mm for base cement.

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A septic, installed as per the instructions on a concrete foundation (anchor weight) would likely do the trick without the danger of crushing from ground pressure or popping out.

 

As usual, no warranty is implied or inferred, YMMV.

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If they say it is for above ground then it will not be designed for in the ground.
In the ground generates a very large ground stress.
I had a strong septic tank fail after a few years and that was designed for in the ground, but not the strongest version.
I got replacement under warranty and paid extra for a stronger version that has a lot more ribs.

 

It does not look strong to me. there are no thick strengthening ribs. It will fail.

 

As noted, buy a good grade septic tank circular/oval (its stronger) and take the gizzards out.

As others have pointed out, there is the danger of floating up when empty. Depends on whether there is a ground water table .
You can check what the water level is in the ground, but It may be low now, in dry season. Could get high in the rainy season.
If there is a high water table now then its likely all the time and you have to keep the tank mostly full after installation.

 

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15 minutes ago, carlyai said:

Normally it would be full all the time. No ground water that I noticed when I built the pool which has a 2 m deep end and dug down another 400 mm for base cement.

What time of year were you building the pool?

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50 minutes ago, Crossy said:

A septic, installed as per the instructions on a concrete foundation (anchor weight) would likely do the trick without the danger of crushing from ground pressure or popping out.

 

As usual, no warranty is implied or inferred, YMMV.

Maybe stick to the initial proposal of putting my IBC TOT in the ground. The local mob know how the build the concrete and reo.construction as they built it for the pool.

Plagerised pic. from TV contributed.

Screenshot_20210114-123322.png

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There are "above ground", "on ground" and "ground" tanks. The OP's picture is a ground tank. Ground tanks are made of reinforced material that can withstand soil compression.  Here are link's to Global's  and  D-Tank's web pages.  

                     https://www.globalhouse.co.th/product/detail/28024442500

                     https://www.piboonbunsab.com/product/183/ถังเก็บน้ำ-pp-ดีแท้งค์-d-tank

                      

 

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5 hours ago, tweedledee2 said:

There are "above ground", "on ground" and "ground" tanks. The OP's picture is a ground tank. Ground tanks are made of reinforced material that can withstand soil compression.  Here are link's to Global's  and  D-Tank's web pages.  

                     https://www.globalhouse.co.th/product/detail/28024442500

                     https://www.piboonbunsab.com/product/183/ถังเก็บน้ำ-pp-ดีแท้งค์-d-tank

                      

 

Sorry that’s only partly correct. Tank illustrated is for on ground not in ground use. That brand’s in ground/underground tanks are these

FEBA306C-9663-4128-A236-95A9187B2A69.thumb.jpeg.fa8f0a0eb6234ecc69933d526b4c84c6.jpeg
No plastic or fibreglass tanks for in ground use have flat tops like the D-Tank above. FWIW We have 3 of the other style under my paint room.
 

Also neither of your links are the makers, they are made by Indra Wutsadu (1997) Co Ltd Both are suppliers of many kinds of tank.

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On 1/17/2021 at 2:27 PM, Crossy said:

A septic, installed as per the instructions on a concrete foundation (anchor weight) would likely do the trick without the danger of crushing from ground pressure or popping out.

 

As usual, no warranty is implied or inferred, YMMV.

While you can certainly use a septic tank like that, it would be better to use a water tank designed for installing in the same way don’t you think? 😉 It would probably make it a bit easier, no?

 

These are all available with a few more sizes than septic tanks as well.


02648740-CAE2-40F5-903D-8B90260D6C8D.jpeg.25ad54f60d56e93fe111f34ef710c361.jpeg52EFC197-2312-4F16-A479-060327641634.jpeg.adba08ce83e2be81f233de44ab973eb6.jpegBF76F22E-7C33-4BE6-9DA1-56A5610ED630.jpeg.e2b2fe06feb3481723358ea26bdd90c8.jpeg52EFC197-2312-4F16-A479-060327641634.jpeg.adba08ce83e2be81f233de44ab973eb6.jpegB8C66A0A-91A6-42C3-A81C-8D956AD24065.jpeg.64a84b4777b48b6ffa47771506634fd6.jpeg8130DD5C-3E8A-457A-AEDA-FDFE4FC162DE.jpeg.689d7f53bf57866ec752adcaffa3689f.jpegThese are all available in Thailand 

 

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Ive seen a few break in the ground, there used to be some pool guys using them for the overflow tanks they didnt last 2 years I made a few quid digging them out and building new concrete tanks.

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13 minutes ago, sometimewoodworker said:

While you can certainly use a septic tank like that, it would be better to use a water tank designed for installing in the same way don’t you think? 😉 It would probably make it a bit easier, no?

 

These are all available with a few more sizes than septic tanks as well.

 

Since our OP isn't using this for potable water using a septic might prove lower cost, much depends upon what's available locally I suspect.

 

 

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Any DOS or WAVE or SAFE water tank dealer can order purpose built underground water tanks. There are several grades of DOS septic tanks and strength may be a reason some models cost significantly more than base models of DOS septic tanks in Thailand. I have been involved in dozens of underground water tank sales in Buriram. The entire luxury house estate Lively Homes bought and installed DOS underground water tanks. There is a real danger in float valves failing on an underground water tank at a most inconvenient time. In 2008 Ruangsangthai in Buriram installed three DOS "Ultra" series septic tanks at my home in Satuk.  They have never failed. 

https://buriramhomesale.com/buriram-house-videos/

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