Jump to content

Thai monks' livestream mixes Buddhism and jokes but not all are laughing


Recommended Posts

15 hours ago, Jonathan Fairfield said:

"That will lead to the decline of Buddhism, which has already existed for nearly 2,600 years without needing to change before."

Paiwan responded with typical levity when asked to comment on the summons: "Laughing has become a national problem!"

That depends on what or who you're laughing at.

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Phuketshrew said:

It seems that most puritanical, hypocritical religious folks are bereft of any sort of sense of humour. God bless, I will say a prayer for them.

I agree with you, those big wigs Buddhist leaders in Bangkok have no sense of humor. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

"

Quote

Monks' behaviour has to be respectable in the public eye. It doesn't have to change with the time to appease young people," said Srisuwan Janya, head of the Association for the Protection of the Constitution. Thailand's complainer-in-chief.

There FTFY

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

These are the same dinosaurs who want you to believe those are the Buddha's footprints at Wat Phra Phutthabat in Saraburi.  Go check them out.  First of all they don't look like footprints and second, they are huge.  Buddha would have been 50' tall to leave a footprint like that, and they don't look like any foot print I've ever seen.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

An interesting and challenging idea.  The things is, if you have the precepts of Buddhism on one hand and the ideas of the younger generation on the other, should they be in conflict, then you really have to make a choice.  Either force the young people to act more in line with the precepts, or abandon them.

 

If you're a monk and your business is Buddhism, you have to follow the rules, or the blessings and merits won't work.  Then you cannot claim the right to not have to work.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Many religions have learned that they needed to change with the times to communicate with the generation at that time. I would think Buddhism to be no different. Sure, they use humor and slang, but with over 2 million people tuning in to hear what they have to say, surely it can be seen as a positive thing.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, BangkokReady said:

An interesting and challenging idea.  The things is, if you have the precepts of Buddhism on one hand and the ideas of the younger generation on the other, should they be in conflict, then you really have to make a choice.  Either force the young people to act more in line with the precepts, or abandon them.

 

If you're a monk and your business is Buddhism, you have to follow the rules, or the blessings and merits won't work.  Then you cannot claim the right to not have to work.

The Buddha pointed out a middle way.  These two younger monks seem to have found a middle ground that makes Buddhism interesting to a younger audience.  As long as they are following the precepts I see nothing wrong with it. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, khaowong1 said:

The Buddha pointed out a middle way.  These two younger monks seem to have found a middle ground that makes Buddhism interesting to a younger audience.  As long as they are following the precepts I see nothing wrong with it. 

Exactly! Except the precepts are not always clearly and consistently defined because Gautama Buddha lived during a period in India when there was no written script. Everything the Buddha taught was passed down by memory for hundreds of years before his teachings were eventually written in the Pali language, in Sri Lanka, during the 1st century BCE. 

 

However, the Buddha lived during the 5th century BCE, and spoke a language which was different from Pali, so already there is a language-translation issue which could distort to some degree what the Buddha actually meant during his speeches.

 

Also, we tend to categorize Buddhism into just a few major sects, such as Theravada which is prevalent in Sri Lanka, Burma and Thailand, and Mahayana which is prevalent in Tibet, and Zen which is a mixture of Mahayana and Taoism, and prevalent in Japan.
However, since the time of the Buddha there has evolved literally dozens of different sects with different interpretations and/or different emphases on the Buddha's teachings.

 

The following Wiki article provides a very detailed overview of the many different sects or schools of Buddhism. However, I couldn't find any mention in the Wiki article of the recent Thai sect named Santi Asoke. This is a Buddhist reform movement which has been heavily criticized by the established Buddhist authority in Thailand, probably because the communities refuse to accept monetary donations, insist on being vegetarian, and support themselves by growing vegetables which they sell at a low price in the local markets.

 

They also allow women to become fully ordained and allow the monks to work within the community, which is very controversial. 😀

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schools_of_Buddhism
 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, VincentRJ said:

Exactly! Except the precepts are not always clearly and consistently defined because Gautama Buddha lived during a period in India when there was no written script. Everything the Buddha taught was passed down by memory for hundreds of years before his teachings were eventually written in the Pali language, in Sri Lanka, during the 1st century BCE. 

 

However, the Buddha lived during the 5th century BCE, and spoke a language which was different from Pali, so already there is a language-translation issue which could distort to some degree what the Buddha actually meant during his speeches.

 

Also, we tend to categorize Buddhism into just a few major sects, such as Theravada which is prevalent in Sri Lanka, Burma and Thailand, and Mahayana which is prevalent in Tibet, and Zen which is a mixture of Mahayana and Taoism, and prevalent in Japan.
However, since the time of the Buddha there has evolved literally dozens of different sects with different interpretations and/or different emphases on the Buddha's teachings.

 

The following Wiki article provides a very detailed overview of the many different sects or schools of Buddhism. However, I couldn't find any mention in the Wiki article of the recent Thai sect named Santi Asoke. This is a Buddhist reform movement which has been heavily criticized by the established Buddhist authority in Thailand, probably because the communities refuse to accept monetary donations, insist on being vegetarian, and support themselves by growing vegetables which they sell at a low price in the local markets.

 

They also allow women to become fully ordained and allow the monks to work within the community, which is very controversial. 😀

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schools_of_Buddhism
 

"However, the Buddha lived during the 5th century BCE, and spoke a language which was different from Pali, so already there is a language-translation issue which could distort to some degree what the Buddha actually meant during his speeches."  Vincent, I got in trouble when I was a monk by pointing this out.  ha ha ha , and I agree with you.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/13/2021 at 2:03 PM, RichardColeman said:

Temples recently seem to have had more fingers in more dodgy pies than Al Capone had dodgy tax dealings

Recently? Such suspicions have been ongoing for quite some time. 

Besides all the suspected dodgy scallawaggery, the basic concept of the Wat and monkhood could be questioned. 

 

The contemporary practices of desiring material goods, becoming financially healed, heeding to earthly pleasures, etc is becoming much more acceptable than of yesteryear. 

It's become an employment conduit, less a calling. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, khaowong1 said:

"However, the Buddha lived during the 5th century BCE, and spoke a language which was different from Pali, so already there is a language-translation issue which could distort to some degree what the Buddha actually meant during his speeches."  Vincent, I got in trouble when I was a monk by pointing this out.  ha ha ha , and I agree with you.  

Thanks for your response. I've never experienced life as a monk, although I have at times considered trying it, because I have a general interest in religious matters, as well as the 'truth' (whatever that is), and I like experimentation.

 

However, the strict adherence to hundreds of rules has put me off life as a Buddhist monk. I'm not a 'conformist'. I prefer to work things out for myself and do what I think is sensible and ethical.

 

I'd be interested to know why you are no longer a monk, and what you gained from the experience.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/13/2021 at 5:31 AM, Jonathan Fairfield said:

With an impressive fluency in youth slang, Phra Maha Paiwan Warawanno, 30, and Phra Maha Sompong Talaputto, 42, have captured the imagination of a generation who find the formal temple decorum and Sanskrit chanting of traditional Buddhism outdated and inaccessible.

Good on them. 👍🏻

 

BTW, “Sanskrit chanting?”

 

Wouldn’t that be Pali chanting since Thailand is a Theravada Buddhist country?

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/14/2021 at 9:58 AM, BangkokReady said:

Just not Buddhism itself...

Depends on who you ask.

 

The Dalai Lama has said that if science proves any of the suppositions of Buddhism incorrect, then Buddhism needs to change accordingly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...