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Do you believe in Tradition and why


GammaGlobulin
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It has fasinated (fascinated) me for years that people can believe in Tradition and that most people adhere to Tradition, over time.

 

When you realize that there are so many thousands of cultures on planet Earth, it must be great to have Tradition to provide a sense of stability and belonging.

 

Do you really believe in Tradition, and the usefulness of Traditions among all cultures?

 

Without Tradition, where would we be?

 

And, if we do not respect others' Traditions, then where would they be?

 

I love Tradition.

 

I love Thai Traditions, American Traditions, Scottish Traditions, Irish Traditions, all kinds of Traditions.

This is just one small part of being human.

 

Again, do I love Tradition?

I cannot even begin to tell you the many glorious ways.

 

Therefore, do you believe in Tradition, even above any known Deity? 

 

And, why?

 

What is Tradition good for?

 

 

 

Edited by GammaGlobulin
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Flowers have always played a major role, traditionally, over many thousands of years.

 

There have always been flowers for the dead, for example, which was also a minor theme in Catch-22.

 

Can you think of at least three ways in which flowers are used to commemorate and celebrate an important tradition in at least three different cultures? 

 

Do you recall the significance of flowers and how they were used, untraditionally, in the short novel, Lady Chatterley's Lover?

 

This novel is all about being out in the woods, communing with Nature, and flora and fauna.

 

Why does the Lily signify what it does for one culture, yet mean something different for another culture?

 

The fine flower of their intimacy was to her rather like an orchid, a bulb stuck parasitic on her tree of life, and producing, to her eyes, a rather shabby flower.

 

Why do some people throw rice at a wedding, and others eat rice at a wedding?

 

For that matter, traditionally, why do Chinese eat noodles, long noodles, to celebrate longevity? 

 

Here is a tradition:  满月酒  Just a party given when a child reaches its first month in life.

 

This is a good excuse for everybody to get sloshed.

 

Also, please prepare a few red eggs.

 

It is not so easy to explain this tradition, in words.

Therefore, please refer to this short video:

 

 

Perhaps you cannot understand the language spoken.

 

But, TRADITION, you might understand.

 

The joy of a newborn child, reaching one month, is cross-cultural and universal.

 

This celebration of a child reaching its first month is like.....VICTORY!

 

Too many infants died, in years gone by, before reaching the first month.

 

(Please Note:  The dialect being spoken in this video is NOT standard Mandarin. Therefore, it's not easily understood by the majority of Han Chinese, one might imagine.  This is why there are Chinese subtitles. Mandarin is being spoken in parts of the video, but not throughout the entire video.)

 

Edited by GammaGlobulin
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I really do not like traditions for myself forced to  follow a fixed pattern and be exited and happy for it. I think I would enjoy some traditions if it was for the right reasons, like mid summer holiday, and not celebrating christmas because of jesus, when it originally was to celebrate it was the darkest time of the year, and the sun would turn back and the spring would finely arrive around what we now call easter, which have completely changed dates from it’s orign. 
 

I understand traditions is important to keep societies and make people feel affiliations and belonging to their homes, family and tribes. 
 

To me it feels a bit forced on and being a very impulsive and flexible man who can change my mind and plans while I go, it is a disturbing factor, and as well hate to spend money on stupid things some traditions involves. 
 

However local traditions is usually good for the local economy. 
 

Edit note: Being traveling and working all my life, and maybe therefor I feel so strong about it, especially sitting in the middle of the sea Christmas eve, and the present crew tried to make it as cosy as home. Full dressed up, decoration’s , foods, entertainment where they brought in priests and famous people, and also other social gatherings for those who was not working night shifts. 
 

I especially remember my first Christmas In Malaysia and Dubai, that felt a bit awkward, and as Quite shocked about American Christmas traditions which is quite over the top. 

Edited by Hummin
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And if that's not loving me
Then all I've got to say
Oh God didn't make little green apples
And it don't rain in Indianapolis
In the summertime
And there's no such thing as Doctor Seuss
Disneyland Mother Goose
There's no nursery rhyme
God didn't make little green apples
And it don't rain in Indianapolis
In the summertime
And when my self is feeling low
I think about her face aglow
To ease my mind

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Tradition is habit passed down from generation to generation - can be personal, local or national - it continues as there is often symbolic significance arising from some legend or some special event in history.

 

Like it or not, It will always exist everywhere in the world. Some I like, some I don't.

 

 

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You mean like going to war for your country so fat rich guys can make millions ?

Or going to religious services every week while getting over on everyone the rest of the time ?

Or being ruled by an Aristocratic elite who is not even from the country you live in ?

Or mindlessly following every rule, law, custom just because all the other people who came before you did the same ?

That is not 'tradition' - that is Slavery

 

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I believe in tradition, but I do not myself think it's necessary to follow it. That is unless, like most of us, you're a "guest" in a foreign country.

 

I've lived in Thailand for over 20 years now, and I do, for the most part, follow the Thai traditions that I know are important to them.

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I have always appreciated this thought by Gandhi. For decades it hung in my college office. "I do not want my house to be walled in on all sides and my windows to be stuffed. I want the cultures of all lands to be blown about my house as freely as possible. But I refuse to be blown off my feet by any."

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There are some aspects of tradition that are meaningful and beneficial to society, and some that cause harm, and prevent forward progress. Ritualistic aspects of tradition are not particularly useful, and lead to superstition, and can lead to great harm, and ruined lives. Other tradition are simply an excuse for bad behavior. I am not a big fan of tradition, in general. Some are ok. Many others are not. 

 

In Kenya, for example, the customary laws of some ethnic communities discriminate against women when it comes to property ownership and inheritance. As one woman told us, “They talk about African traditions, but there is no tradition you can speak of—just double standards.”

 

Similarly, several former British colonies, including Nigeria and Malaysia, use moral terms such as “gross indecency” and “carnal knowledge against the order of nature” in rejecting homosexuality, citing so-called traditional values embodied in laws that in fact only date to the relatively recent, and otherwise derided, colonial era. In Uganda, Malaysia, Moldova, and Jamaica, where the state rejects LGBT rights, claims that homosexuality is simply “not in our culture” are ubiquitous.

 

https://www.hrw.org/news/2013/01/11/trouble-tradition

 

Child marriage is an issue that is pervasive still across many countries due to economic, social and cultural norms. The reasons behind these marriages are varied, often parents arrange the marriage unbeknownst to the child and many are arranged for economic purposes as it can mean one less person to feed.

 

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a practice most often carried out by traditional circumcisers, who often play central roles in communities. It is a violation of the human rights of girls and women, and reflects deep-rooted gender inequality and female discrimination. 

 

https://coraminternational.org/themes/harmful-traditional-practices/

 

These harmful traditional practices include female genital mutilation (FGM); forced feeding of women; early marriage; the various taboos or practices which prevent women from controlling their own fertility; nutritional taboos and traditional birth practices; son preference and its implications for the status of the girl child; female infanticide; early pregnancy; and dowry price.

 

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5c7d541e40f0b603d7852921/PB_What_is_the_harm_S02_18Dec17.pdf

 

I take the following quotation of Mahatma Gandhi as my guiding light in this matter: “It is good to swim in the waters of tradition but to sink in them is suicide.”  
 

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/traditions-are-not-bad-but-they-need-to-evolve-constantly/articleshow/56838173.cms?from=mdr

 

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10 minutes ago, thaibeachlovers said:

Soooo, let's give up all holidays that are traditional- no gifts at Christmas or Christmas dinner, no Easter eggs; no parades of any sort; no graduation ceremonies at school/uni; etc etc etc.

What a sad world it would be.

You can not think of other solutions to make the world a bit brighter than religious and other forced traditions that also makes parts of people feeling left out of many different reasons?

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Hummin said:

You can not think of other solutions to make the world a bit brighter than religious and other forced traditions that also makes parts of people feeling left out of many different reasons?

 

People can participate in any tradition they like and no one feels "left out"

   

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4 minutes ago, Mac Mickmanus said:

People can participate in any tradition they like and no one feels "left out"

   

Thats a bold statement, and a very naive statement. 
 

First google link out of many showing how holidays can negatively impact people
 
According to the American Psychological Association, 38% of people surveyed said their stress increased during the holiday season, which can lead to physical illness, depression, anxiety, and substance misuse
 
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1 minute ago, Hummin said:

Thats a bold statement, and a very naive statement. 
 

First google link out of many showing how holidays can negatively impact people
 
According to the American Psychological Association, 38% of people surveyed said their stress increased during the holiday season, which can lead to physical illness, depression, anxiety, and substance misuse
 

^Miserable people feeling even more miserable because other people are happy during holiday seasons .

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11 minutes ago, Hummin said:

You can not think of other solutions to make the world a bit brighter than religious and other forced traditions that also makes parts of people feeling left out of many different reasons?

 

 

 

I can, but they all depend on tradition.

 

There is always someone that gets left out. It's a cruel world, and nature isn't fair. Few of us get the hot girl for a GF at school, and some of us never had a hot girl in our bed.

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5 minutes ago, Hummin said:

Thats a bold statement, and a very naive statement. 
 

First google link out of many showing how holidays can negatively impact people
 
According to the American Psychological Association, 38% of people surveyed said their stress increased during the holiday season, which can lead to physical illness, depression, anxiety, and substance misuse
 

Given that apparently a large segment of humanity can't get through the day without chemical mind altering assistance ( alcohol, mj, valium, illegal drugs etc ) I'd say a larger segment of population is affected by depression, anxiety etc than 38%.

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14 minutes ago, Mac Mickmanus said:

^Miserable people feeling even more miserable because other people are happy during holiday seasons .

Sometimes it is ok to agree, even we have different views, and yes as Thaibeach says it is a cruel world we live in where the survival  of the fittest still rules. I have no problem with that. Still it is ok to have emphasis with people who might feel left out. 
 

Everyone have a weak link somewhere or at some time in life, and it definitely shows when traditions becomes more extreme than healthy. 

Edited by Hummin
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7 minutes ago, thaibeachlovers said:

I can, but they all depend on tradition.

 

There is always someone that gets left out. It's a cruel world, and nature isn't fair. Few of us get the hot girl for a GF at school, and some of us never had a hot girl in our bed.

Listen, hear hear do I sense some positivity from you?

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39 minutes ago, thaibeachlovers said:

Soooo, let's give up all holidays that are traditional- no gifts at Christmas or Christmas dinner, no Easter eggs; no parades of any sort; no graduation ceremonies at school/uni; etc etc etc.

What a sad world it would be.

As always, UP2U, feel free to celebrate, recognize any tradition or holiday.

 

I enjoy some holidays, even Christian, though an Atheist.  Traditions, not so much.  ex: tradition of flowers and or candy for Valentines, at 5-10X normal prices for roses.  Some traditions are nothing but marketing, or money grab, as posted above - tradition women aren't equal in divorce or money matter in some countries.  Not tradition, that just wrong.

 

Best local example, Sin Sot, Thai / farang, it's tradition, but most Thais would never pay Sin Sot for used, divorced wife, 2nd marriage w/kids.

 

But those benefitting will tell you, it's 'Thai tradition' ... 😎

 

Fine line  between some holidays, tradition, peer pressure, getting scammed 🤣

Edited by KhunLA
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Just now, Hummin said:

Listen, hear hear do I sense some positivity from you?

I do have some positive qualities, but just as the "news" as reported is overwhelmingly negative, I tend to the opinion that the negative is more interesting than posting about butterflies and hummingbirds.

Does anyone want to hear about the guy that has a Chinese/Thai millionaire girlfriend that waits on him hand and foot? Anyone that claims such gets rightly rubbished.

 

I also think that I should warn the unwary noobies of the many pitfalls of life in LOS, given that I had to find them out the hard way myself.

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13 minutes ago, thaibeachlovers said:

 

 

I also think that I should warn the unwary noobies of the many pitfalls of life in LOS, given that I had to find them out the hard way myself.

We all have our experiences for good and bad, as well lived a life in Asia as well many other countries. 
 

Is there one thing there is to many of, is foreigners who have negative experiences and more than wiling to share them wherever you go especially in Thailand, and also found here at this fora. There is no way you are not warned or going to miss the warnings or the pitfalls. But we all have to make our own experiences, and how we deal with negative happenings, it to be true, very individual. 
 

 

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I can accept traditions other people follow if they do no harm. There are many traditions that do.

 

Only in America could anyone establish a tradition of pardoning turkeys.

 

IMO one of the most ridiculous traditions I have ever seen is Christmas dinner in Australia, a roast dinner with hot plum pudding for dessert when the ambient temperature in the shade is 40 C. I created my own tradition of cold crayfish, salad and a Margaret River dry white with a dessert of fruit salad.

 

The traditions of law courts and government assemblies IMO are anachronisms, they remind me of Henry Ford's observation that history is bunk.

 

I observe the traditions of golf, a sport I have played most of my life. That's about it.

Edited by Lacessit
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1 minute ago, Lacessit said:

IMO one of the most ridiculous traditions I have ever seen is Christmas dinner in Australia, a roast dinner with hot plum pudding for dessert when the ambient temperature in the shade is 40 C.

Or seeing a fat Asian man dressed in red with a white beard with a sack over his shoulder and walking around a Pattaya shopping mall shouting "Ho Ho ho" at Christmas 

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