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I never used a microwave in my life, and I don't think I ever missed one.

Now I will buy a whole new kitchen, with oven, induction hobs, big refrigerator, etc.

I could add a microwave. Should I? Why?

 

I guess the following matters: I live with my gf, no kids, in the middle of Bangkok, and we usually go shopping at the fresh market and supermarket (24h, Foodland) almost every day. We don't buy much in advance because we want fresh products, and we don't know today what we want to eat tomorrow.

We never buy frozen meat or any other frozen things. We can buy them fresh, so why should we buy them frozen.

 

Should I add a (build in) microwave to my kitchen? Why?

 

P.S.: My Thai gf is a great cook. She also never used a microwave in her life.

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Mine has quarz grill, convection and microwave. The grill I use for toasts. The convection I use for backing up baguette and bread. The microwave I use for sausages or frozen stuff. But also for things that I would steam otherwise like vegetables and fish. I don't have an extra oven or grill. In respect of grill try to get a quarz grill if possible. Gets hot much faster. 

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I'm surprised that you and your wife have never used a microwave.

 

Look what you can do with a microwave as stated by SS above and a lot more.

 

You don't know what you're missing.

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I have a combo microwave that apart from microwaving can grill, bake, steam, as well as fry eggs and bacon, etc, etc.  It also has a function that combines microwaving with grilling or baking, speeding up the cooking. I'm still discovering its capabilities and I've had it a while. Overall, it probably works best for people whose idea of a night in is to warm up a pizza, but for me, it's convenient – and fast.  

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1 hour ago, anchadian said:

I'm surprised that you and your wife have never used a microwave.

 

Look what you can do with a microwave as stated by SS above and a lot more.

 

You don't know what you're missing.

 

1 hour ago, scubascuba3 said:

I use a microwave for jacket potatoes, porridge, vegetables, baked beans, milk, defrosting. Speed and less hassle is the main advantage 

I appreciate all your answers.

As far as I see (until now) the only "killer application" for a microwave is defrosting.

All the other things can also be easily done with (induction) hobs and oven. Especially induction hobs heat up very quickly and can be precisely adjusted.

 

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I think a built in one looks better - if it's stainless steel, and makes the counters look cleaner and less cluttered.

 

One on the cabinets is more convenient, easier to change, refresh - but not as aesthetically pleasing.

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Microwaves use less energy than a conventional oven. They also heat up food much faster.

I always use the microwave to zap takeaways I have bought, to ensure the food is thoroughly cooked. If I have canned soup, also useful. Canned coffee, ditto.

 

Note to OP: As you have never used a microwave before, putting anything with metal in a microwave is a VERY bad idea. Expect a lot of spitting with fatty foods.

 

Microwaves function by imparting heat energy to any water present. I find it useful heating up a cup of water for shaving, in preference to using more energy and time with a kettle.

 

Plenty of inexpensive benchtop microwave ovens around, Lazada has over 4000 of them.

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don't get one with the old-style dial timer, get one with a digital keypad. it means you can punch in the exact time that you want instead of having to either guess, or stand there and count down the seconds.

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One other thought. Should you decide to sell your refurbished apartment future owners (or maybe renters) would expect one.

Other suggestion, if you cook a lot of roasts, then a pyroclean oven is a bonus. You just sweep out the cremated dust. Unless of cause you have an "oven wallah".

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If you haven't felt the need for one for this long a time, once the novelty wears off, you'll probably find yourselves using it mostly for warming leftovers.  You can soften frozen meat and poultry but do it a bit to long and it can steam the meat and give it an off taste,  If you have the space and budget, why not?   If you don't get one, you probably won't miss it.  Get the lowest price known brand. No need for any bells and whistles, people rarely use them.

If you do get one, put some thought into placement.  Many are installed too high in cabinets or set atop refrigerators creating a hazard for somebody reaching up to take out a hot dish or bowl.   A friends son got badly scalded on his upper body that way when a bowl of heated soup was hotter than expected.

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I highly recommend a microwave. Not that you might cook with it - dedicated appliances for grilling, baking etc. are better (and larger) but the function to warm up things is a definite bonus and you will use this quite a lot.

 

Now I do not know how spacious your kitchen is and how important a kitchen is for you at all. We have friends here in our condo tower who rarely use it. But we are cooking enthusiasts and own a whole armada of kitchen appliances. These take tremendous space away. So build the microwave in the wall and make sure you will have support for it for a long time. This gives you more space for the rest of the machines you might want to use.

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Thanks for all your comments. I appreciate it.

 

After I read all the comments, I am not convinced I would ever use it.

I am buying a modular kitchen with mostly 60cm wide cabinets. That allows me to easily insert a built-in microwave if I want to add one later for whatever reason. Electricity is also no problem. There are enough outlets.

 

Thanks! 

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2 hours ago, Pmbkk said:

 

I think a built in one looks better - if it's stainless steel, and makes the counters look cleaner and less cluttered.

 

One on the cabinets is more convenient, easier to change, refresh - but not as aesthetically pleasing.

When we bought the past two ovens, a teka (which we returned 9 months later because they couldn't send anyone to repair the thing) and then an Electrolux, we bought an oven with an accompanying nicrowave, both were fitted appliances - the microwave didnt cost much more than the oven alone.

 

We don't use it to cook, just a bit of reheating, melting butter / chocolate for cakes, heating water for a second or two to make bread - well handy.

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19 minutes ago, OneMoreFarang said:

Thanks for all your comments. I appreciate it.

 

After I read all the comments, I am not convinced I would ever use it.

I am buying a modular kitchen with mostly 60cm wide cabinets. That allows me to easily insert a built-in microwave if I want to add one later for whatever reason. Electricity is also no problem. There are enough outlets.

 

Thanks! 

They are good for cooking vegies its quick and apparently it retains more nutrients.

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You can now get 1 that bakes, microwave, convection bake, and air fryer.   Air fryer is healthier than frying in oil.   Great for leftovers.  Don't you ever have lol leftover rice? Or stuff.   It reheats foods great.  Air popcorn popper is better.  Those microwave bagged popcorn are expensive and don't ysst so good.  We bought a counter model for 200$   I removed the one above the stove.  Needed a vent hood to outside for her cooking. 

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2 hours ago, OneMoreFarang said:

 

I appreciate all your answers.

As far as I see (until now) the only "killer application" for a microwave is defrosting.

All the other things can also be easily done with (induction) hobs and oven. Especially induction hobs heat up very quickly and can be precisely adjusted.

 

Jacket potatoes would take a lot longer in an oven, hour+, 6+ mins in microwave

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1 minute ago, Elkski said:

 Great for leftovers.  Don't you ever have lol leftover rice?

No.

We have a good rice cooker which keeps rice in good quality even after 24 hours.

When my gf makes some Thai dishes, she just reheats them on the hobs (currently electric). Maybe 5min, done.

I don't intend to ever reheat pizza or 7/11 food or anything like that.

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2 hours ago, Lacessit said:

... Note to OP: As you have never used a microwave before, putting anything with metal in a microwave is a VERY bad idea. Expect a lot of spitting with fatty foods. ...

My son used an old microwave (with a 15 foot extension on the control panel) to "nuke" things like bars of soap, CD's, light bulbs and whatnot.  Great fun.  There are ways to actually melt metals like silver and zinc without damaging the oven.  It requires a susceptor, a material used for its ability to absorb electromagnetic energy and convert it to heat.

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6 minutes ago, Damrongsak said:

My son used an old microwave (with a 15 foot extension on the control panel) to "nuke" things like bars of soap, CD's, light bulbs and whatnot.  Great fun.  There are ways to actually melt metals like silver and zinc without damaging the oven.  It requires a susceptor, a material used for its ability to absorb electromagnetic energy and convert it to heat.

I remember a scene from the movie "Under Siege" when Steven Seagal used a microwave to create an explosion in the ship's galley.

I use a susceptor of half a cup of water when heating a pad filled with wheat. I forgot the water once, result combustion.

I applaud your son, curiosity and experimentation seem to be quite rare nowadays.

My favorite was the catalytic oxidation of ammonia, quite spectacular. My science teacher forbade further experiments, I think he was worried I might start making nitroglycerine.

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2 hours ago, Lacessit said:

I remember a scene from the movie "Under Siege" when Steven Seagal used a microwave to create an explosion in the ship's galley.

I use a susceptor of half a cup of water when heating a pad filled with wheat. I forgot the water once, result combustion.

I applaud your son, curiosity and experimentation seem to be quite rare nowadays.

My favorite was the catalytic oxidation of ammonia, quite spectacular. My science teacher forbade further experiments, I think he was worried I might start making nitroglycerine.

That reminds me of my friend from school time who decided to create nitroglycerin - in a 6-family house.

He actually did it and nothing went wrong.

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Forgot to add earlier, makes an  ideal plate warmer. But not the gold rimmed ones. Unless you want a light show!

With Christmas coming up, then so much easier to use a microwave for 5ish minutes on the pud than steaming for half a day. 

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7 hours ago, dddave said:

No need for any bells and whistles, people rarely use them.

That is very true, straight forward heating stuff up is what they are best for.

I have never adjusted the power level on a microwave for example.

The only control I use is the timer.

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