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Thai trial shows railway’s agricultural haul potential


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A recent trial by Thailand Science Research and Innovation (TSRI) has demonstrated the vast potential of railway logistics for long-distance transportation of agricultural products. The experiment resulted in a 13-fold reduction of carbon emissions compared to air freight, as well as significant cost savings.

 

Running the trial with high-efficiency mobile refrigerated container trains, TSRI transported the Royal Project’s fresh produce from the north to the south of Thailand. The results were encouraging, both in terms of product quality and environmental impact, stated environmental researcher, Assistant Professor Charnnarong Puchongkawarin.

 

“Railway logistics had the lowest carbon emission rate compared to land and air freight.”

 

Assist. Prof. Charnnarong stated that trains emit 0.06 kilogrammes of carbon dioxide per tonne of products, while aeroplanes emit 0.7–0.8kg and road logistics emit 0.36kg.

 

“Switching to rail helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The reduced emissions mean you can generate income by selling your carbon credits.”

 

Moreover, the trial demonstrated that the products could withstand the three-day journey across the country, arriving fresh and undamaged. The cost of transportation was also significantly reduced, decreasing from 14 baht/kg by road to 4 baht/kg by train.

 

In other news, the Chinese government, through the Lancang-Mekong Cooperation Special Fund (LMCSF), has granted 25 million baht to Thailand’s National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA) to support three research studies.

 

These projects, conducted by the National Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (Biotec) and the National Metal and Materials Technology Centre (MTec), focus on edible mushrooms, cordyceps in the Mekong region, cassava disease control, and high-speed rail freight standards.

 

Ekarat Wainit, director of the modern rail system and transportation technology research at MTec, highlighted the importance of enhancing the technological capabilities of the Lancang-Mekong industrial sector. He believes that these improvements will foster economic sustainability and long-term cooperation for countries in the Lancang-Mekong region, reported Bangkok Post.

 

Since 1978, when Thailand and China signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) on science and technology, the LMCSF Project has funded over 1,000 research projects, according to Ma Minggeng, an adviser on science and technology with the Chinese Embassy of Thailand.

 

By Alex Morgan

Caption: Picture courtesy of Wikapedia

 

Source: The Thaiger 2024-04-17

 

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13 hours ago, snoop1130 said:

the Chinese government, through the Lancang-Mekong Cooperation Special Fund (LMCSF), has granted 25 million baht to Thailand’s National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA) to support three research studies.

Beware of Geeks bearing gifts.

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20 hours ago, snoop1130 said:

A recent trial by Thailand Science Research and Innovation (TSRI) has demonstrated the vast potential of railway logistics for long-distance transportation of agricultural products. The experiment resulted in a 13-fold reduction of carbon emissions compared to air freight, as well as significant cost savings.

The mind boggles... sheer genius

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19 hours ago, Banana7 said:

If Thailand had a more efficient railway system, a non-stop freight train could travel from northern to southern Thailand in less than 2 days.

 

 

China is working on it... 

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Once, I suggested that waste plastic be sent from Phuket for recycling by train instead of truck. Much cheaper. People were shocked. Never crossed their minds. 

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This subject often comes up in the UK, get stuff off the road on to trains, very true.

But, more so here in Thailand than the Uk, you first have to get the said produce to a railway depo, that could imply a long road journey, if you live in a rural area like most farms are.

And what about the infrastructure at the depo, that will have to be upgraded, for loading, then unloading no single-track roads now.

Can not see it working.  

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5 minutes ago, kickstart said:

This subject often comes up in the UK, get stuff off the road on to trains, very true.

But, more so here in Thailand than the Uk, you first have to get the said produce to a railway depo, that could imply a long road journey, if you live in a rural area like most farms are.

And what about the infrastructure at the depo, that will have to be upgraded, for loading, then unloading no single-track roads now.

Can not see it working.  

In the uk we spent hours in sidings in frieght trains/ engineering trains the passenger trains have priority 

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The nation has been ignoring the development of rail for cargo for 70 years now. This is a chief reason why the highways are so clogged with trucks of every size. The lack of vision and planning are an abomination and a huge deterrent to a higher quality of life for the people. 

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