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Warning Lights Indicating a Potential Terrorist Threat to the US Blinkin Red Again


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In a climate reminiscent of the period leading up to the 9/11 attacks, the United States once again faces significant terrorist threats. Current FBI Director Christopher Wray, among other senior officials, has been vocal about the rising dangers. His warnings are strikingly similar to those issued by former CIA Director George Tenet, who persistently sounded the alarm about Osama bin Laden and al Qaeda before the devastating attacks on September 11, 2001.

 

Wray has consistently highlighted an increasingly dangerous environment, exacerbated by the recent attack by Hamas on Israel on October 7. He has publicly emphasized the vulnerabilities at the United States’ southern border, where thousands of individuals cross undetected each week. This concern reflects the broader issue of foreign terrorists potentially exploiting any entry point into the country. The seriousness of the current threat landscape is underscored by the statements from other high-ranking officials. General Erik Kurilla of CENTCOM has pointed out the alarming capabilities of various terrorist groups, including ISIS, al Qaeda, and particularly ISIS-K, the ISIS affiliate operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Kurilla has warned that ISIS-K could launch an operation against U.S. or Western interests with little to no warning. Additionally, Christine Abizaid, the outgoing Director of the National Counterterrorism Center, has described the global threat environment as significantly elevated.

 

These concerns are not just theoretical. Recent successful and thwarted attacks around the world indicate a growing danger. For instance, ISIS-K has carried out deadly attacks in Iran and Russia, illustrating its capability to inflict substantial harm. In the United States, the FBI has thwarted several plots, including a significant plan to attack critical infrastructure last fall. This highlights the persistent threat from both foreign and domestic terrorists.

 

Wray has publicly categorized threats into three main areas: international terrorism, domestic terrorism, and state-sponsored terrorism. All these categories are simultaneously elevated, posing a complex and multifaceted danger. He has specifically pointed to Iran as a potential state sponsor of terrorism, noting that Tehran continues to plot against high-ranking U.S. officials in retaliation for the assassination of Qasem Soleimani in January 2020. Although these plans have been unsuccessful so far, the risk remains high.

 

Moreover, Wray has raised concerns about security vulnerabilities at the U.S. southern border. He has warned that foreign terrorists could exploit this entry point, drawing attention to specific smuggling networks with ties to ISIS. This scenario underscores the importance of robust border security measures to prevent potential terrorists from entering the country. Given the alarming rise in threats, the U.S. administration must adopt a proactive approach to counterterrorism. This involves drawing lessons from past successes and failures. For instance, President Bill Clinton’s response to the millennium-era threats in 1999 offers valuable insights. Back then, U.S. intelligence agencies collected information suggesting that al Qaeda was preparing to launch multiple attacks. Although the exact targets and methods were unclear, Clinton ordered a comprehensive and aggressive response. This included a series of operations in 53 countries, targeting 38 different terrorist cells, resulting in numerous detentions and disrupted plots.

 

One of the most notable successes from this period was the prevention of a planned attack on Los Angeles International Airport in December 1999. Alert immigration officers at the U.S.-Canadian border arrested al Qaeda operative Ahmed Ressam, who was carrying 100 pounds of high explosives and materials for multiple detonators. This incident demonstrates the effectiveness of heightened vigilance and swift action in preventing terrorist attacks.

 

For the current administration, a similar comprehensive campaign is essential. This begins with the intelligence and security community providing clear and consistent information about the threats. While Wray and Kurilla have been vocal, other officials need to be equally transparent. Congressional intelligence committees should hold unclassified hearings with the directors of national intelligence agencies to offer their candid assessments. This will help policymakers and the public understand the gravity of the threats and the necessary responses.

 

Intelligence agencies should also reexamine previously collected information related to terrorism. Revisiting earlier reports can reveal new insights or uncover overlooked details, which might be crucial in identifying and thwarting potential plots. This approach was undertaken by the CIA in the summer of 2001, although it did not prevent the 9/11 attacks, it did highlight valuable information that had been previously missed. Additionally, the U.S. must take steps to address the vulnerabilities at its borders. President Biden’s recent executive order to restrict asylum processing is a step in the right direction, but further measures are needed to ensure that terrorists do not exploit the overwhelmed southern border. This may include the use of national emergency authorities to enhance border security and limit the entry of potential terrorists.

 

Preventive action must also extend beyond U.S. borders. Given the immediate threat posed by ISIS-K, the U.S. may need to consider unprecedented measures, such as limited cooperation with the Taliban. Although the idea of working with the Taliban is controversial, the group is also an adversary of ISIS-K. Intelligence exchanges, where the U.S. provides information about possible ISIS-K targets in Afghanistan in return for insights from the Taliban about the group’s capabilities and plans, could be mutually beneficial.

 

This approach should also extend to Pakistan, where ISIS-K operates as well. Collaborative efforts to neutralize the group’s capabilities can significantly reduce the threat it poses. Such measures require careful coordination and trust-building but are necessary to prevent potential attacks on U.S. interests. While these steps are challenging, especially in an election year, the threat of terrorism cannot be ignored. Terrorist groups do not respect political calendars and can strike without warning. Over the past two decades, the efforts of thousands of Americans in the military and intelligence communities have prevented another major attack like 9/11. However, the work is far from over. Policymakers must rise to the challenge to protect the U.S. homeland from an ever-present and evolving terrorist threat.

 

In conclusion, the current warnings from FBI Director Christopher Wray and other officials indicate a serious threat of a terrorist attack in the coming months. The administration must adopt a comprehensive and proactive approach to counterterrorism, drawing on lessons from the past and taking decisive action to prevent potential attacks. This involves enhancing intelligence efforts, securing borders, and addressing threats overseas. The stakes are high, and complacency is a greater risk than alarmism.

 

Credit: Foreign Affairs 2024-06-24

 

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18 minutes ago, Cryingdick said:

 

is Fox News making uo facts when they release statistics saying that more than 10 million people have been allowed  in, largely unvetted and more than a million have got away with no scrutiny of any kind? Do you want these people as your neighbors in your Jom Tien condo?

I wouldn’t put much store in anything FIX News claims to be a fact, they have admitted in a court of law to lying.

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3 minutes ago, Chomper Higgot said:


So.

1. international terrorism

2. domestic terrorism

3. state-sponsored terrorism

 

And all the 9/11 attackers entered the U.S. on valid visas.

 

So let’s scream about the southern border.

 

Because of course no matter how complex the issue, the solution must always be simple.

 

Scream about both right?

 

4 hours ago, Social Media said:

FBI Director Christopher Wray and other officials indicate a serious threat of a terrorist attack in the coming months. The administration must adopt a comprehensive and proactive approach to counterterrorism, drawing on lessons from the past and taking decisive action to prevent potential attacks. This involves enhancing intelligence efforts, securing borders, and addressing threats overseas.

 

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1 hour ago, Tug said:

The felon killed the strongest border legislation in decades hes the one you should be thanking 

You guys keep saying open border,I have yet to meet someone who espouses that why is that pray tell it’s simple no one is for open borders

Meet some proponents of open borders.

https://www.thenation.com/article/society/open-borders-immigration/

Edited by Hawaiian
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Biden , Trump , Putin , Xi , Orban , Kim Yong Un , Modi , etc , etc ..

The " President " gets too much power in the present political system .

It is just not healthy to let just one man decide the future of a country without a control mechanism that makes sure that he cannot abuse the system . In the US the control mechanism is the ' impeachment ' process that can be applied to a President gone rogue . What about Putin , Kim and other autocratic rulers ?

The fault of the democratic system , where nearly half of the voters ( in the US it is nearly 50/50 , just as in England ) , are not represented by a newly elected government .

Always a government should consist of coalitions between the biggest parties , never let just one party alone decide everything .

THAT would be democratic .

 

Edited by nobodysfriend
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41 minutes ago, thaibeachlovers said:

IMO get rid of parties altogether and elect leaders based on their qualifications and not on their ability to bribe the electorate.

Even better, once AI becomes a reality use an AI to govern in the best interests of the population.

What makes you think AI will govern in the best interests of the population?

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49 minutes ago, thaibeachlovers said:

Even better, once AI becomes a reality use an AI to govern in the best interests of the population.

 

Depends on the AI. I wouldn't want to be governed by Zuckerberg's AI or Google's AI. But I'm probably okay with Elon's AI.

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Just taking the original post at face value, without adding opinion, it was a Bush Republican government that ignored the warning signs of 911 and Clinton's Democratic government that prevented more attacks.

In addition, at the cost of stirring up a hornet's nest of AN approbation, it could be said that the Democratic government under Obama found Bin Laden while the Republicans did not.

 

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10 hours ago, Social Media said:

In a climate reminiscent of the period leading up to the 9/11 attacks, the United States once again faces significant terrorist threats. Current FBI Director Christopher Wray, among other senior officials, has been vocal about the rising dangers. His warnings are strikingly similar to those issued by former CIA Director George Tenet, who persistently sounded the alarm about Osama bin Laden and al Qaeda before the devastating attacks on September 11, 2001.

He needs the 2nd term 🤔

we have seen this some years ago. 

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