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Hd Ready Vs Hd?


bkkjames

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I enjoy Full HD with downloaded films or Blueray.

With UBC-HD only some (new) film are very sharp, the rest not so big difference.

But football and other sports are wonderful in Full HD and you can feel the difference against HD ready (720 lines against 1080).

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I enjoy Full HD with downloaded films or Blueray.

With UBC-HD only some (new) film are very sharp, the rest not so big difference.

But football and other sports are wonderful in Full HD and you can feel the difference against HD ready (720 lines against 1080).

thanks

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I enjoy Full HD with downloaded films or Blueray.

With UBC-HD only some (new) film are very sharp, the rest not so big difference.

But football and other sports are wonderful in Full HD and you can feel the difference against HD ready (720 lines against 1080).

Apparently your set is 1080p cabable, right? If so, doesn't that mean that when you feed it a 720p signal that the TV is going to interpolate extra pixels to scale up the image to 1080p resolution? There might be some image quality degradation in that process. What I'm thinking is that if you compared a 720p feed played on a panel with only 720p capability that it might look better than when played on a 1080p panel, assuming that the size of the panels are both the same and that the panels are otherwise identical except for the pixel count. I say that because then the 720p panel would have bigger pixels than the 1080p panel and no interpolation would be necessary when it's fed a 720p signal.

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@bkkjames the box is definitely capable of receiving full hd and sending out full hd to your tv.

is True sending out full hd to your box is another question.

This is what I'm not grasping. I assume that when people in this thread are talking about "HD Ready" TVs they are talking about TVs that have 720p panels and that when they talk about "Full HD" they are talking about TVs that have 1080p panels. But most networks distribute HD television programming to cable companies encoded in 720p and a lesser number in 1080i (as opposed to 1080p). If True's set-top box is outputting a 1080p signal, then it must be interpolating pixels to upscale each frame from 720 X 1280 pixels to 1080 X 1920 pixels. But doing that shouldn't increase the resolution of the image, should it? If the original signal was encoded in 720p, wouldn't it be preferable for the set-top box to output it in it's native 720p format and to display it on a 720p panel instead of a 1080p panel?

Edited by OriginalPoster
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@bkkjames the box is definitely capable of receiving full hd and sending out full hd to your tv.

is True sending out full hd to your box is another question.

This is what I'm not grasping. I assume that when people in this thread are talking about "HD Ready" TVs they are talking about TVs that have 720p panels and that when they talk about "Full HD" they are talking about TVs that have 1080p panels. But most networks distribute HD television programming to cable companies encoded in 720p and a lesser number in 1080i (as opposed to 1080p). If True's set-top box is outputting a 1080p signal, then it must be interpolating pixels to upscale each frame from 720 X 1280 pixels to 1080 X 1920 pixels. But doing that shouldn't increase the resolution of the image, should it? If the original signal was encoded in 720p, wouldn't it be preferable for the set-top box to output it in it's native 720p format and to display it on a 720p panel instead of a 1080p panel?

That is what precisely what i am trying to tell bkkjames i wrote,

is True sending out full hd to your box is another question.

What i am implying is, if or since True is sending out the signal at 720p what's the point of upgrading to a Full HD TV .

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@bkkjames the box is definitely capable of receiving full hd and sending out full hd to your tv.

is True sending out full hd to your box is another question.

This is what I'm not grasping. I assume that when people in this thread are talking about "HD Ready" TVs they are talking about TVs that have 720p panels and that when they talk about "Full HD" they are talking about TVs that have 1080p panels. But most networks distribute HD television programming to cable companies encoded in 720p and a lesser number in 1080i (as opposed to 1080p). If True's set-top box is outputting a 1080p signal, then it must be interpolating pixels to upscale each frame from 720 X 1280 pixels to 1080 X 1920 pixels. But doing that shouldn't increase the resolution of the image, should it? If the original signal was encoded in 720p, wouldn't it be preferable for the set-top box to output it in it's native 720p format and to display it on a 720p panel instead of a 1080p panel?

That is what precisely what i am trying to tell bkkjames i wrote,

is True sending out full hd to your box is another question.

What i am implying is, if or since True is sending out the signal at 720p what's the point of upgrading to a Full HD TV .

Bingo-the 40 baht question that needs answering-i guess we could call true, nevermind...

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What i am implying is, if or since True is sending out the signal at 720p what's the point of upgrading to a Full HD TV .

Well, some people also watches DVD 9 or blue ray movies and for that you need a Full HD TV to fully capitalise on resolution available. Also a TV will probably last you for at least ten years and during that time technology will have been improved so why not prepare for that at this time and buy a Full HD TV already now. 720p TVs are already dated technology.

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What i am implying is, if or since True is sending out the signal at 720p what's the point of upgrading to a Full HD TV .

Well, some people also watches DVD 9 or blue ray movies and for that you need a Full HD TV to fully capitalise on resolution available. Also a TV will probably last you for at least ten years and during that time technology will have been improved so why not prepare for that at this time and buy a Full HD TV already now. 720p TVs are already dated technology.

Yes, but the original poster already has a 720p television and was pondering replacing it with a 1080p in order to accommodate True's HD system. Getting an 1080p set is an easier call if one does not already have a HD television, it's a tougher call if you already have a 720p set and if most of your HD content will be coming from a cable TV company. The question then is whether it makes sense to discard a well functioning 720p set in order to get a 1080p set.

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Well I have 2 hd ready tvs, one 42 and one 32, I don't want to replace them to full hd if not neccessary.

So back to true, are they now or will they be broadcasting in Full HD in the near future?

Blueray is nice but I don't watch enough movies to make this as the justification for 'upgrading'.

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Well I have 2 hd ready tvs, one 42 and one 32, I don't want to replace them to full hd if not neccessary.

So back to true, are they now or will they be broadcasting in Full HD in the near future?

Blueray is nice but I don't watch enough movies to make this as the justification for 'upgrading'.

If True is broadcasting real 1080p content that puts them way in front of the pack compared to their peers in other countries. That would surprise me in a country that is just starting to roll out 3G in 2011.

But as far as I know, True can only give you real, non-upscale 1080p once HBO, ESPN, Sky, etc start providing cable companies with 1080p content. Presently most networks are distributing 720p or 1080i content only.

Edited by OriginalPoster
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Do they even upscale the signal out to 1080p and dish out. I doubt so too.

Doing so would be costly for them too, too much bandwidth taken.

probably it's being upscaled by the set-top box in each customer's home rather than at True. I had a set-top box like that in the States for a while, it was selectable whether it would resample to 720p, 1080i, or 1080p or output the native resolution of whatever was fed into the box.

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What's this about a new box from True?

Is everyone getting one? Or only HD subscribers?

I will not be getting one because I have Astro Byond, which now has 15 HD channels and sometimes also sends premiere league games in 3D. Next 3D broadcast is Man U vs. Chelsea.

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What's this about a new box from True?

Is everyone getting one? Or only HD subscribers?

I will not be getting one because I have Astro Byond, which now has 15 HD channels and sometimes also sends premiere league games in 3D. Next 3D broadcast is Man U vs. Chelsea.

Sounds like torture rather than enjoyment or is it to make up for their one dimensional play?

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Slightly off topic, but I will post anyway.

Here in the Middle East I have just bought an HD box for Abu Dhabi sport,

covering the Barclay League. The signals are 1080 and quality superb.

I hope to watch F1 racing in HD next week, with the English commentary. :D

It is all down to what the provider gives in their HD signal, and all the posts

I have read about True so far suggest the answer is cr*p.

Astro from Malaysia gets much better reviews.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 1 month later...

@bkkjames the box is definitely capable of receiving full hd and sending out full hd to your tv.

is True sending out full hd to your box is another question.

This is what I'm not grasping. I assume that when people in this thread are talking about "HD Ready" TVs they are talking about TVs that have 720p panels and that when they talk about "Full HD" they are talking about TVs that have 1080p panels. But most networks distribute HD television programming to cable companies encoded in 720p and a lesser number in 1080i (as opposed to 1080p). If True's set-top box is outputting a 1080p signal, then it must be interpolating pixels to upscale each frame from 720 X 1280 pixels to 1080 X 1920 pixels. But doing that shouldn't increase the resolution of the image, should it? If the original signal was encoded in 720p, wouldn't it be preferable for the set-top box to output it in it's native 720p format and to display it on a 720p panel instead of a 1080p panel?

I have the new box and you can set it for 720p or 1080i. I also have a 32 inch HD ready TV. Do you think I should set the box at 720? the installer said the TV was Ok for the 1080.

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I have the new box and you can set it for 720p or 1080i. I also have a 32 inch HD ready TV. Do you think I should set the box at 720? the installer said the TV was Ok for the 1080.

Not quite sure what you mean by "new box"

If it is the satellite box, set it for 1080

then read the TV manual.

I would not believe what the installer says.

He might be right, then again...................

especially if the TV is only HD Ready.

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I have the new box and you can set it for 720p or 1080i. I also have a 32 inch HD ready TV. Do you think I should set the box at 720? the installer said the TV was Ok for the 1080.

Not quite sure what you mean by "new box"

If it is the satellite box, set it for 1080

then read the TV manual.

I would not believe what the installer says.

He might be right, then again...................

especially if the TV is only HD Ready.

Sorry if i was unclear on this. I had a standard box so the new box is the HD box.

After reading a lot of stuff about this it seems that if my TV which is HD ready is only 768 lines not 1080. there is no benefit in setting the box to 1080 as my TV cannot do that and will only"stretch" the pixels giving me a worse ppicture. I believe that my Tv is set by the signal in (as is most audio /visual equipment), so I would think that I need the signal to the TV to be set correctly not the TV. Unfortunately I cannot read the TV manual, I bought my TV 6 years ago and the manual seems to have disappeared into dust, as has the technology

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I am not sure the TV will stretch the picture and distort it as you suggest.

Try both settings and see which you feel is best.

To be honest I don't think you will see any difference

but I might be wrong.

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