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Thais continue to criticize government pick-up laws


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Thais continue to criticize government pick-up laws

 

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Picture: Daily News

 

BANGKOK: -- Thais continued to slam the military government for what they saw as its heavy handed and inconsiderate rules about riding in the cargo bed and cab of pick-ups.

 

The comments from online posters and a well known lawyer came as the junta backtracked on the timeframe for the implementation of the rules leaving it until after Songkran reported Daily News.

 

An online lawyer called Kertphon Kaewkert commented that the regulations were not new at all. It was just that the police did not enforce them.

 

But he said that suddenly saying that the law would be enforced was essentially unfair to the people.

 

Many people had bought vehicles that were now unfit for their intended use.

 

Kertphon said that a warning of the impending implementation of the law should have been made at least 4 to 6 months ago to give the people time to prepare.

 

Also, he said, that people had bought insurance to carry 12 passengers. Was this to now be worthless expenditure?

 

He suggested sarcastically that people would have been better off buying a motorcycle, not a pick up, if they could only seat two.

 

But while many were very angry, others online had a field day poking fun at the junta.

 

One man combined a joke and a serious message on social media with a picture of a man sweltering in the back of a pick-up saying:

 

"It is as hot as fire but we have to ride in the back - because being poor is scary". This came from Amphai Matkhumson.

 

On Facebook posters shared pictures of fines that had already been issued before the government backtrack. One showed a 200 baht fine for "incorrect use" of a pick-up in which people were travelling in the back.

 

Source: Daily News

 
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-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2017-04-06
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“But he said that suddenly saying that the law would be enforced was essentially unfair to the people.

 

Of course it's "unfair" in the land of mai pen rai, and a culture where truth and commitment hold little value. If laws start being enforced, what's next? Teachers mandated to teach meaningful material? Students given grades based on achievement and not their families' statuses? Stores being held accountable to back their products' guarantees and warranties? The transportation industry providing safe buses and minivans? ? Contractors meeting safety standards? The list of unenforced laws that protect the public can go on forever. 

 

Sometimes, certain standards need to be implemented and enforced to protect irresponsible people from themselves, as well as promoting the welfare of the general public. 

Edited by jaltsc
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more proof of how stupid people can be, by putting convenience over saving lives. The PM should've stood his ground on this one. The laws are already there, either implement them or shut up about the constant pontifications of government departments wanting to save lives.

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13 minutes ago, taichiplanet said:

more proof of how stupid people can be, by putting convenience over saving lives. The PM should've stood his ground on this one. The laws are already there, either implement them or shut up about the constant pontifications of government departments wanting to save lives.

The truth is that this was allowed and people built their lives around what was allowed. There are millions of smart cab pickups out there that were bought with the belief that the vehicles could transport more than two people. A pickup is a big expense. Now these millions of people (with families) will have to dump their pickups and try to buy yet another vehicle but one even more expensive. If the government was going to begin enforcing these laws, they really needed to do a major campaign over a couple of years so people could find a way to adapt.

Edited by canuckamuck
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Tough  luck boys suck it up :thumbsup:

More rules and regulations for Drivers and Riders in Thailand is a good thing.

Get over it obey the new rules

 

Enforcing it all,  is a bit harder,  we need an attitude adjustment by the police to address that one.

 

Maybe give the police officer a direct percentage of the take,   for the offence committed.  :ohmy:

Got to try something,  as it don't work so well at present. :jap:

 

 

 

 

Edited by onemorechang
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Leadership is about doing the right thing, even if the move is unpopular. I understand this decision will impact many people, who have bought pick ups and now find they have a problem. If implemented and enforced, this time next year we can expect to see  a higher number of those people, to still be alive though.

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Suck it up people Laws are there for a reason "To Save Lives"

I only wish they would enforce the existing rules like helmets and only two people on a  motorcycle or going the wrong way on the road. Kids driving motorcycles without a licence. Burnt out tail lights or no lights at all.I could keep on going and fill a book about it. Buses or baht bus with people on the roof or way overloaded, there should be limits and rules put in place for them too.People are upset and yes a four month window would have been good but it still would be the same because no one would change or follow the rules until they are fined and then cheaper to pay the 100 - 400 baht fine then make to trips after all ticket good for one day just show next policeman went he stops you. Enough of my rant.

Edited by metisdead
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He should have been a bit smarter about how this was done - all good rules by the way. But traveling in the bed of a pick up truck is dangerous particularly during SongKran...people will die/get injured due to the PM's backing down. He would have saved lives by enforcing that ban immediately.

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You have to laugh at Farang calling Thais stupid for protesting this. Its the stupidity of the Farang, unable to see beyond his own vision.

 

Open/Smart Cab trucks are about 600,000B. 4 door trucks are about 800,000B. For years, for ever in fact, riding on bench seat in an Open/Smart Cab has been acceptable, not legal, but nobody was prosecuted. 

 

These trucks combine being able to run the family business with being able to transport the family around. Having the kids in the cab of a truck is clearly safer than them being on a motorbike, in the back of a Songtaew or on public transport.

 

Somchai and Somying earn maybe 25,000B a month from their business. Their car is their biggest purchase, but they can't justify a 4 door due to the extra cost and reduction in size of the pick up bed. 600,000B is the entirety of 2 years income, 800,000B is an extra 8 months on that. They need to live as well, where would the money come from?

 

So they struggle by for years, get the Smart Cab, the smart option. Then with the stroke of a pen Uncle Too makes their investment worthless and they become easy pickings for the police day in, day out.

 

You want them to shrug it off and find nearly three years salary? You think they're stupid for protesting? The stupidity comes from the top, and the criticising Farang. Bunch of idiots.

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3 hours ago, jaltsc said:

“But he said that suddenly saying that the law would be enforced was essentially unfair to the people.

 

Of course it's "unfair" in the land of mai pen rai, and a culture where truth and commitment hold little value. If laws start being enforced, what's next? Teachers mandated to teach meaningful material? Students given grades based on achievement and not their families' statuses? Stores being held accountable to back their products' guarantees and warranties? The transportation industry providing safe buses and minivans? ? Contractors meeting safety standards? The list of unenforced laws that protect the public can go on forever. 

 

Sometimes, certain standards need to be implemented and enforced to protect irresponsible people from themselves, as well as promoting the welfare of the general public. 

" HOURS after the new strict road safety regulations were put in place under Article 44 "

 

The Nation reporter seems to think they are new.

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This may be a silly question, but if it is illegal to ride on the bench seat of a pickup, why is it there? It takes up a lot of useful room, and is easily damaged by goods placed on it. A useable load tray with tie-down points would be safer and cheaper to manufacture!

 

Conversely, if it is not illegal per se, but only because of the lack of seat belts, what apart from cost is the problem with fitting them?

i understand there may be problems with vehicle tax and registration, insurance etc., surely these can be fixed by a mountain of paperwork and a few(or a lot?) of baht.

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41 minutes ago, nahkit said:

Unless you're selling pick-up trucks of course.

And there lies the rub.

Due to the high number of pick ups on the Thai roads, a massive local parts/accessories industry has been built up to cater for the pick up market.

Because of this, Thailand has become the hub of the manufacture and export of pick up parts/acessories.

A lot of these manufacturers now rely on local sales, which help to balance the loss in export sales, which were badly effected from the European Union withdrawing the 'Form A' (tax relief) status on products inported from Thailand from the beginning of 2016.

If the local sales of pick up vehicles decreases by any great margin then a lot of these companies will be forced to close down.

On top of this, the pick up manufacturers, who are based in Thailand and employ many Thais, will have to consider cutting back on staff.

 

As already mentioned above, a lot of people have already invested and planned their lifestyles based on the purchase of their pick up, which will now leave them fully shafted.

 

While we may all agree that the enforcement of this law is in principle a good idea, the ripple effect that it will cause will be a catastrophe for many of the poorer Thais.

Edited by TopOfTheMorning
Spelling rectification
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1 minute ago, TopOfTheMorning said:

And there lies the rub.

Due to the high number of pick ups on the Thai roads, a massive local parts/accessories industry has been built uo to cater for the pick up market.

Because of this, Thailand has become the hub of the manufacture and export of pick up parts/acessories.

A lot of these manufacturers now rely on local sales, which help to balance the loss in export sales, which were badly effected from the European Union withdrawing the 'Form A' (tax relief) status on products inported from Thailand from the beginning of 2016.

If the local sales of pick up vehicles decreases by any great margin then a lot of these companies will be forced to close down.

On top of this, the pick up manufacturers, who are based in Thailand and employ many Thais, will have to consider cutting back on staff.

 

As already mentioned above, a lot of peolpe have already invested and planned their lifestyles based on the purchase of their pick up, which will now leave them fully shafted.

 

While we may all agree that the enforcement of this law is in principle a good idea, the ripple effect that it will cause will be a catastrophe for many of the poorer Thais.

Add to that the larger than usual fall in re-sale value when the owners try to trade it in for a new vehicle.

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I seem to recall many years ago, around 20 years maybe, that samlor's, 3 wheeled motorcyle and sidecar contraptions were deemed illegal and were to be banned from the roads......we can all see how that panned out!

Edited by LennyW
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1 hour ago, darksidedog said:

Leadership is about doing the right thing, even if the move is unpopular. I understand this decision will impact many people, who have bought pick ups and now find they have a problem. If implemented and enforced, this time next year we can expect to see  a higher number of those people, to still be alive though.

Wishful thinking of you believe this rule will actually be enforced.....too many Thais and too many pick-ups.

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2 minutes ago, ChrisY1 said:

Wishful thinking of you believe this rule will actually be enforced.....too many Thais and too many pick-ups.

Don't get me wrong. I do NOT believe it will be properly enforced, at least not quickly. Changing the habits of half a nation overnight is too much to ask for.

I do though believe that it is a good idea in the long run, it will save countless lives. I won't be holding my breath though.

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3 hours ago, onemorechang said:

Tough  luck boys suck it up :thumbsup:

More rules and regulations for Drivers and Riders in Thailand is a good thing.

Get over it obey the new rules

 

Enforcing it all,  is a bit harder,  we need an attitude adjustment by the police to address that one.

 

Maybe give the police officer a direct percentage of the take,   for the offence committed.  :ohmy:

Got to try something,  as it don't work so well at present. :jap:

 

 

 

 

I can hardly wait until all the rules imposed on me in the west come to Thailand. I sure miss the nanny state.

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Slightly off topic, but making people wear safety helmets on motorbikes would be where they should start, 75% of road deaths are due to motorbike accidents.

 

Then move on to red lights. Small steps.....

Edited by sungod
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Just now, johnmcc6 said:

I can hardly wait until all the rules imposed on me in the west come to Thailand. I sure miss the nanny state.

We don't want that,

But 3500 +  a year dead on the roads and god knows how many with permanent injuries,  is crap.

Something needs to change.

Or maybe Thailand should just carry on down the same denial road for ever.

What do you think ?

 

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Normalcy bias kills many families worldwide, while sitting on seat belts and riding in the back of pickups without restraints. 

 

Unfortunately for most, it takes a crisis for most families before they wake up to the perils and their ignorance.

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The individual described as an "online lawyer" should study up on subjects he wishes to comment on;

Kertphon Kaewkert said that suddenly saying that the law would be enforced was essentially unfair to the people.  Indeed.  Enforcing  the non commercial use of the beaches was unfair to the organized crime syndicates who controlled the  concessions. So what? 

 

Many people had bought vehicles that were now unfit for their intended use.

One cannot  expect to obtain protection from the law when engaged in an illegal act. This lawyer apparently missed the fundamental principle in his first year law class.

 

Kertphon said that a warning of the impending implementation of the law should have been made at least 4 to 6 months ago to give the people time to prepare.

The  faulty logic  is astounding. Should the government  also provide 4-6 months notice that it will enforce the helmet law, or that it will inspect heavy vehicles?  The danger is here and now. The carnage must stop now.

 

Also, he said, that people had bought insurance to carry 12 passengers. Was this to now be worthless expenditure?

The crowning glory of sheer and absolute ignorance.  Insurance policies can be endorsed or amended or even cancelled. Nothing stops an insured from changing the insurance policy. What does he think happens when an insured replaces or otherwise disposes of  an insured vehicle?

 

 

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Christ! Course people shouldn't travel in the back of pickups. Its a no brainer. Accident and most dead.
I was in the back of my aunts Peugeot van in ... 1987, my aunt was heavily fined for that.
If only Thailand could move into the 20th century. 21st would be impossible.

Sent from my i-mobile_i-STYLE_219 using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

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What he should have done is given notice of this enforcement of the law. Suddenly applying the rules was bound to get a reaction. On the other hand, now they know how expats feel when we turn up at immigration to find a long ignored rule is suddenly in force.

Sent from my iris 505 using Tapatalk

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2 hours ago, TopOfTheMorning said:

And let's not forget that with less passengers to a vehicle there will be the need for more vehicles to further clutter up the already crammed roads.

"clutter up the already crammed roads".  What???? Where do you live? In some city centre??

Outside of cities, In my experience, the only time there are crammed roads is during holidays.

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