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What’s in a name? Tesco Lotus in Thailand rebrands to “Lotus’s” (no, really)


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What’s in a name? Tesco Lotus in Thailand rebrands to “Lotus’s” (no, really)

 

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Image: Sermwit Petchmanee

 

Your local branch of Tesco Lotus will soon look a little different.

 

On Monday, the Charoen Pokphand Group announced it was dropping the Tesco Lotus brand name.  

 

The change ends a 23 year association with the famous British supermarket chain in Thailand. 

 

From now on, Tesco Lotus will be known as “Lotus’s” and have a completely new logo.

 

The new name and branding, which was unveiled at the opening of a new store in Ek-Mai Ramintra in Bangkok, helps to keep the association with the old brand while at the same time heralding a new era for the brand in Thailand

 

The promises promises a “smart shopping experience” for consumers in Thailand.

 

Apparently the lowercase ‘s’ at the end of “Lotus’s” stands for “smart”:

 

Simple 

Motivate

Agile

Responsible

Transformative and Sustainability

 

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Image: Positioning Mag

 

Last year, the CP Group, which is one of the country’s largest conglomerates acquired Tesco’s operations in Thailand and Malaysia for $10.6 billion.

 

The deal had come under the scrutiny of regulators amid claims the deal would result in an unfair monopoly and a lack of competition across the sector. 

 

However, the firm was given the green light to complete the deal in November 2020. 

 

CP Group operates many of the convenience stores and supermarket brands in Thailand  and has more than 14,000 retail stores throughout the country.

 

According to Positioning Mag, the group’s portfolio in the sector includes 12,089 7-Eleven outlets, 136 branches of Makro, 400 CP Fresh Mart stores and over 2,000 Lotus stores. 

 

S__5169289.jpg

Image: Positioning Mag

 

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-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2021-02-16
 
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The deal had come under the scrutiny of regulators amid claims the deal would result in an unfair monopoly and a lack of competition across the sector. 

However, the firm was given the green light to complete the deal in November 2020. 

 

Quelle surprise

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24 minutes ago, webfact said:

Apparently the lowercase ‘s’ at the end of “Lotus’s” stands for “smart”:

I  can think of a better four  letter "s"  word along with the word  total  monopoly.

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21 minutes ago, Captain Monday said:

Much better. A grand decision.

A grand decision to put a totally incorrectly spelt logo, and then have to tell everyone that the last S means smart. Not very smart in my opinion. 

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 Lotus Is or Lotus Was??  

 

anyway now that it is no longer a UK label, they have thought they'd achieved a way around copyrights? (but saves on steel/plastic&paints not starting anew from scratch)

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I'm sure part of the deal was the obligation to change the name away from Tesco.

 

But it really looks like there are better options than the one chosen.

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They are just reclaiming what they used to own, but had to sell

off to reduce debt after the 1978 bubble burst, they now have 

control over all aspects of food production and distribution in

Thailand.

regards Worgeordie

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3 minutes ago, stevenl said:

I'm sure part of the deal was the obligation to change the name away from Tesco.

 

But it really looks like there are better options than the one chosen.

LOTUS would have been fine. Or Smart LOTUS. Not the silly one they have gone for. Luckily most Thais will not know what it says anyway, they could have put a picture of a frog or buffalo or Hello Kitty for them instead.

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