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Preparing to leave the car idle again for 2 years, any ideas?


Velleman
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If you decide to not have it started while you are gone, Shell makes a high quality preservative oil for piston engines.  Approved for aircraft engine preservation by Lycoming and Continental.  It works!

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On 12/5/2021 at 7:24 AM, seedy said:

Do NOT cover it with a PVC cover - which is plastic and will trap any condensation under the cover, encourage mold growth.

I was thinking the same thing; especially during the hot wet and humid season(s) in Thailand.

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On 12/5/2021 at 10:59 AM, Longwood50 said:

You might consider putting the car up on jacks to keep the pressure off the tires and creating a flat spot.  Also, now they sell pretty cheap solar battery tenders to keep the battery fully charged.

 

image.png.d584c6dec51d0093efbb27d62f90e9ea.png

For the past 15 years I have left my car through the UK winters connected to a solar battery charger; (1.5w), and she has started 1st time every Spring when I returned from Thailand. For several years she was in a garage with little direct sunlight, and light only through some windows. For the last 3 winters she has been outside. When leaving I always give her a good run to leave the battery fully charged.

Edited by SunsetT
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I did this but I had someone sell our car after 6 months being stood, it was 9 years old and we got a good price for it in good condition. 
 

We once stood an old pickup for about a year and rodents ate the wiring.

 

Better to sell and rent or buy when you return. 

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1 hour ago, Qman said:

If left unattended for a long time rats and mice can get under the hood and destroy wiring and other things.  We live in a farming area and people put moth balls in unattended equipment and also use a spray with peppermint oil.  Both seem to help keep rodents away from their machines, especially ones with cabs on them.  It seems to work if you don't mind the smell of moth balls later.

 

If there are cats or dogs around your storage area they also keep rodents away.

I had a rat problem under the bonnet. I used the spray and it worked a treat. I suggest that if you have someone starting the car every month, you get them to give a few sprays around the engine .

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On 12/4/2021 at 3:07 PM, Velleman said:

- PVC car cover.

- Have someone turn on the engine and air conditioning for 15 minutes once a month.

Good idea. Better if they can actually drive it around for 15 minutes once warmed up to operating temperature. Stops flat spots on tyres (although after another 2 years I would replace tyres anyway).

 

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A lot of good suggestions for storing your car for two years.  Some require another person to assist while you are gone others don't.  As the car has been stored before for a period of time and now you are going to store again for two years I think it would be a good idea to sell the car.  This eliminates having to worry about the car while you're gone and also if it will work properly when you return.  Being nine years old already it won't lose a lot of value but that shouldn't really be a consideration.  If it were me, I'd sell it.  Put the money in the bank and when you return just buy another car.  

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If you disconnect the battery you will lost some car settings (radio is one) that need constant electricity. OK, no problem if you have the radio code. Otherwise it can maybe be found at the dealer. Better let it be connected and just charge it 2 times/year (example).

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Get rid of it imo but barring that full tank of gas it’s gasoline powered correct?with fuel stabilizer try to find gas that has no ethanol if possible easyer on the gaskets and seals disconnect the battery if no one’s going to start it 2 table spoons of engine oil in each cylinder treat the engine bay and interior with rodent repellent and hope for the best!or just get rid of it!

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My Vigo has been longing for me for 2 years and a lovely gal drives it around a bit every 2 weeks., it is parked under a screened park. Last week she sent me photos of cracks in all tyres, even tho 2 of them were damn near new just before I departed LoS for covid lockdown.

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On 12/4/2021 at 10:11 PM, MrJ2U said:

Disconnect the battery and get some fuel stabilizer.

 

If possible have a friend start it a few times a month.

 

Disconnecting the battery won't save the battery. The battery is dead after 2 years if it is not used, I believe.

 

Can some car expert confirm this?

 

Edited by EricTh
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6 minutes ago, EricTh said:

 

Disconnecting the battery won't save the battery. The battery is dead after 2 years if it is not used, I believe.

 

Can some car expert confirm this?

 

When you turn the ignition off, lock the doors, the battery is still working, feeds are still being supplied to stuff, so over time it will probably take out the battery.

A battery removed or disconnected will still lose charge too, but at a much slower rate, so giving it a charge every few months is a good idea, a job for a friend.

 

Personally, I would leave the battery connected, buy a milliamp trickle charger and leave it connected to the battery.

 

My fun ride spent most of its life in the garage connected to a milliamp trickle charger for months at a time over many years, always had a fully charged battery to turn the 7 litres of engine...😊

 

 

 

 

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I was told that I should not disconnect the battery on my Honda HRV.

 

I always disconnect my batteries in my truck in Canada when I leave for Thailand and was surprised to be told not to for the Honda.

Had a Thai friend call Honda to confirm, and they did. But was unable to get the reason for this. They said if the battery was disconnected, I would have to bring the car to the service shop!

 

I had my battery fail once and got a guy to bring me a new one. He connected the new battery to the car with a jumper before disconnecting the old one, so there must be something to it...

 

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57 minutes ago, EricTh said:

 

Disconnecting the battery won't save the battery. The battery is dead after 2 years if it is not used, I believe.

 

Can some car expert confirm this?

 

https://www.91wheels.com/news/disconnect-car-battery-when-not-in-use-for-long

 

It's wise thing to do when leaving your car unattended for longer than a month.

 

Battery replacement will be cheaper than screwing up your internal electronics or motherboards.

Edited by MrJ2U
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54 minutes ago, transam said:

When you turn the ignition off, lock the doors, the battery is still working, feeds are still being supplied to stuff, so over time it will probably take out the battery.

A battery removed or disconnected will still lose charge too, but at a much slower rate, so giving it a charge every few months is a good idea, a job for a friend.

 

Personally, I would leave the battery connected, buy a milliamp trickle charger and leave it connected to the battery.

 

My fun ride spent most of its life in the garage connected to a milliamp trickle charger for months at a time over many years, always had a fully charged battery to turn the 7 litres of engine...😊

 

 

 

 

What is a trickle charger and how do I install that?

 

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5 minutes ago, EricTh said:

What is a trickle charger and how do I install that?

 

Here is one from Lazada....You plug it in the wall socket; connect the red to positive, the black to negative....Run the wires so the hood won't chop or cut them & you're done.....

The bottom pic is near what I have keeping my 4Runner charged while maintaining the various module's memories.....

Screenshot_2021-12-07-10-49-03-10_39060a31215a48c7aaf1fb3368fa2e89.jpg

Screenshot_2021-12-07-10-49-56-18_40deb401b9ffe8e1df2f1cc5ba480b12.jpg

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I think the solar battery tenders are interesting. I'm guessing the OP will turn off the power when he leaves so a trickle charger is out. 

 

If the battery is left connected for two years unattended and without a charger it will be completely dead, and it will be no different than the battery being disconnected as far as the car can tell.

 

I believe that along with discharging much faster, a connected battery discharges much further as well, often ruining the battery.  

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1 hour ago, MrJ2U said:

 

Battery replacement will be cheaper than screwing up your internal electronics or motherboards.

Car to expand on this one please.. never heard of a connected battery possibly screwing up internal electronics or motherboards.

 

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4 minutes ago, Ralf001 said:

Car to expand on this one please.. never heard of a connected battery possibly screwing up internal electronics or motherboards.

 

Why would the car expand on the battery? 

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42 minutes ago, Ralf001 said:

Clean your glasses and have another read.

 

Well, your post was confusing, car instead of care, you should read it before you post....😋

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1 hour ago, EricTh said:

What is a trickle charger and how do I install that?

 

Plug it into the mains then clip on the crocodile clips to the battery, ensuring the hood when closed doesn't touch them...

Be sure to buy a trickle charger that can be left on permanently....

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20 hours ago, seedy said:

Gotta a laugh at some of the posts here - on a topic that has been done many times before

My HD sat in a steel crate for almost 7 years. Full of gasahol 95 and Stabil. The brakes did not rust, the fuel system did not fill with chalky whatever. The o-rings were fine. It was never turned over even once during all that time. No one even looked at it !

Drained the fuel, filled with fresh, installed a new battery, rode it away.

 

Eethanol is hygroscopic, meaning it attracts water from the atmosphere. Water and ethanol are corrosive, which is bad news for older tanks, fuel lines, and carburetors. Ethanol can also do nasty things to rubber seals.

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