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As schools prepare to reopen, what toll has COVID taken on Thailand’s children?


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By Thai PBS World’s General Desk

 

Schools in Thailand will open their doors for the first time in more than two years on May 17, as the pandemic recedes.

 

The Education Ministry made the decision to send kids back to school in line with the government’s transition to living with COVID as an endemic disease.

 

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But while many children will be keen to get back to class, experts say their emotional and other needs must be addressed as they make the big switch from two years of home learning.

 

Heal children’s souls

 

Sompong Jitradup, an education expert at the Equitable Education Fund (EEF) and a former lecturer at Chulalongkorn University, suggested that schools devote the first month of the upcoming semester to healing children emotionally.

 

Full story: https://www.thaipbsworld.com/as-schools-prepare-to-reopen-what-toll-has-covid-taken-on-thailands-children/

 

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-- © Copyright Thai PBS 2022-05-16
 

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Just talked to the GFs daughter. She is ready to return in the morning, actually very excited. Her father is upset because he had to spend 4,695 baht on new uniforms when she did not wear the ones from last year that still fit.

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2 hours ago, webfact said:

schools devote the first month of the upcoming semester to healing children emotionally.

Probably a month of teaching kids discipline and how to behave in the classroom again would be more helpful.  Many students have seen the last school year as a long holiday.  Study online was very ineffective.

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2 hours ago, ThailandRyan said:

The toll will be on how they will now need to learn how to socialize with fellow students whom they have not seen in almost 2 years.

Nah, kids have been hanging out the whole time.  There might be a few per class whose parents kept them in, but I'm sure they will be "socialised in" by the other students.  It happens fairly naturally.

 

The real issue is "how to get kids that have effectively just had a year long school holiday back in the right frame of mind to study properly in a classroom?".

 

Also, most schools were open for the first year of the pandemic.  They just missed a couple of months.  Online learning was in year two.

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1 hour ago, StayinThailand2much said:

uniforms, and hair length...

Uniforms have nothing but a positive effect (hair cuts debateable).  Unless you feel that "building a consumer identity" is something that is more important for school students than learning...

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14 minutes ago, BangkokReady said:

Nah, kids have been hanging out the whole time.  There might be a few per class whose parents kept them in, but I'm sure they will be "socialised in" by the other students.  It happens fairly naturally.

 

The real issue is "how to get kids that have effectively just had a year long school holiday back in the right frame of mind to study properly in a classroom?".

 

Also, most schools were open for the first year of the pandemic.  They just missed a couple of months.  Online learning was in year two.

The school my GF's daughter goes to is a WAT school and the kids come from all around and not just the ones near where she lives primarily, in fact there are no kids for several blocks in the Housing mooban she lives in.  Most are older folks with their teenage grandkids and their own children who are workers in BKK.  The daughter has not talked to one of the kids that she has had in her class for almost 2 years and then some may have moved back to the provinces with their families.  Only time will tell, and I hope your right.  I can see mass confusion starting tomorrow with the kids getting smacked with the rulers again to gain control....

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, dinsdale said:

I do disagree. It's not about "healing children emotionally" whatever that actually means it's more about 'play time' is over. It's back to school. My daughter needs no "emotional healing". She needs to get off her phone. Straight back into learning/teaching. This is what needs to happen. If anyone can try and define what "healing children emotionally" means I would be interested to see.

Thats a mute point as its not going to happen anyway. I agree just getting them back to school and learning is the most important point and what needs to happen.

 

However to say you're unaware of the psychological damage that could be caused by keeping young children away from school for 2 years really proves to me why teachers also lack that concept.

 

Here's just one explainer there are many more:

https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2021/11/08/covid-harmed-kids-mental-health-and-schools-are-feeling-it

Edited by Bkk Brian
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It may well be sink or swim for some.

My son changes from primary to high school.

The new school has not even had an orientation day for these new students.

And no books issued so i would say it will be a slow build for teachers and students.

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Teacher walks into class says ok students get ready for math.  

Somchai reaches down gets his phone and opens facetime. 

Teacher sees somchai and asks why he isn't getting ready.

 

He looks at her confused and tells her this is how he got ready for the past 2 years.

 

 

 

 

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37 minutes ago, kingstonkid said:

Teacher walks into class says ok students get ready for math.  

Somchai reaches down gets his phone and opens facetime. 

Teacher sees somchai and asks why he isn't getting ready.

 

He looks at her confused and tells her this is how he got ready for the past 2 years.

Somchai reaches down, gets his phone, opens facetime, switches off the camera and mutes the microphone, then goes back to playing games.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Bkk Brian said:

Thats a mute point as its not going to happen anyway. I agree just getting them back to school and learning is the most important point and what needs to happen.

 

However to say you're unaware of the psychological damage that could be caused by keeping young children away from school for 2 years really proves to me why teachers also lack that concept.

 

Here's just one explainer there are many more:

https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2021/11/08/covid-harmed-kids-mental-health-and-schools-are-feeling-it

Sorry but disagree again. My daughter is ok. Kids are very resilient. They've been having fun with their friends and doing some online stuff. The online stuff is dependent on the teacher. My daughter got into the top high school in the province. Only took 294 studentds into M1 so I think she's done ok. She came in at 104. I was very happy. Too much online games but she'll be fine. Nomophobia maybe a a bit of a problem because she is somewhat addicted like so many others but I think the 'experts' overplay things just so they can call themselves experts. Personally I think it will all be fine. Kids will just get on with it without 'experts' projecting their 'expert' opinion on them.

Edited by dinsdale
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5 hours ago, ThailandRyan said:

The toll will be on how they will now need to learn how to socialize with fellow students whom they have not seen in almost 2 years.

If it's anything like the kids around me they've continued to play with each other every day, and for those out of town a bit video calls have been hours a day.

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7 minutes ago, dinsdale said:

Sorry but disagree again. My daughter is ok. Kids are very resilient. They've been having fun with their friends and doing some online stuff. The online stuff is dependent on the teacher. My daughter got into the top high school in the province. Only took 294 studentds into M1 so I think she's done ok. She came in at 104. I was very happy. Too much online games but she'll be fine. Nomophobia maybe a a bit of a problem because she is somewhat addicted like so many others but I think the 'experts' overplay things just so they can call themselves experts. Personally I think it will all be fine. Kids will just get on with it without 'experts' projecting their 'expert' opinion on them.

Happy to hear your daughter is ok, it seems according to the evidence that this is not the case for every child as a result of 2 years with no school. As for the experts projecting their opinions, is that not what teachers do also?

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Bkk Brian said:

Happy to hear your daughter is ok, it seems according to the evidence that this is not the case for every child as a result of 2 years with no school. As for the experts projecting their opinions, is that not what teachers do also?

 

 

Thanks. Remember evidence is based on the study. If the study is flawed so is the evidence. As for teachers they should not project their personal opinions. This is not good teaching. I said this at the very beginning of all this. The kids will be fine. Seems to me like the adults have had a harder time.

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1 minute ago, dinsdale said:

Thanks. Remember evidence is based on the study. If the study is flawed so is the evidence. As for teachers they should not project their personal opinions. This is not good teaching. I said this at the very beginning of all this. The kids will be fine. Seems to me like the adults have had a harder time.

Here take a look if you want to be informed:

 

Promoting children and young people's mental health and wellbeing

Guidance on the 8 principles of a whole school or college approach to promoting mental health and wellbeing.

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/promoting-children-and-young-peoples-emotional-health-and-wellbeing

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5 hours ago, StayinThailand2much said:

Sadly, more often than not education here is big business, and not only at private schools. If teachers worry more about getting an expensive car than education, then there's something seriously wrong with the educational system.

 

Not to mention rote-learning, grade manipulation, outdated teaching and testing methods, nationalism, anthem, uniforms, and hair length...

It's quite obvious that the whole of the educational systems - from top to bottom - requires a complete makeover, as to removing the traditional/subliminal patronage, political and profiting schemes that inundate schooling across the board.....forgetting the that educational practices belong to the general fitness and well being of the commons, not proposed systematic agendas.

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31 minutes ago, dinsdale said:

Sorry but disagree again. My daughter is ok. Kids are very resilient. They've been having fun with their friends and doing some online stuff. The online stuff is dependent on the teacher. My daughter got into the top high school in the province. Only took 294 studentds into M1 so I think she's done ok. She came in at 104. I was very happy. Too much online games but she'll be fine. Nomophobia maybe a a bit of a problem because she is somewhat addicted like so many others but I think the 'experts' overplay things just so they can call themselves experts. Personally I think it will all be fine. Kids will just get on with it without 'experts' projecting their 'expert' opinion on them.

Amazing how that works, huh....

We could all do with less impute from experts.

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Posted (edited)
25 minutes ago, Bkk Brian said:

Here take a look if you want to be informed:

 

Promoting children and young people's mental health and wellbeing

Guidance on the 8 principles of a whole school or college approach to promoting mental health and wellbeing.

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/promoting-children-and-young-peoples-emotional-health-and-wellbeing

First published 2015 with some updates. I looked through it and couldn't find anything relating to covid and online study in relation to student's mental well-being. Seems to bear no relation to the topic. 

Edited by dinsdale
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6 hours ago, ThailandRyan said:

The toll will be on how they will now need to learn how to socialize with fellow students whom they have not seen in almost 2 years.

There will also be an enormous problem with discipline and general attitude.

Many of these KIds have been nothing short of " Feral " now for long period of time.

Time they have spent on their own, while the parents try to earn enough to survive.

Time they have forgotten manners and Social Skills Etc.

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Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, dinsdale said:

First published 2015 with some updates. I looked through it and couldn't find anything relating to covid and online study in relation to student's mental well-being. Seems to bear no relation to the topic. 

Its everything to do with the topic and quote I mentioned which I have inserted for you below, strategies for coping and promoting emotional health are not outdated just because that paper was written in 2015

 

6 hours ago, webfact said:

Sompong Jitradup, an education expert at the Equitable Education Fund (EEF) and a former lecturer at Chulalongkorn University, suggested that schools devote the first month of the upcoming semester to healing children emotionally.

You said: "If anyone can try and define what "healing children emotionally" means I would be interested to see."

 

I have provided evidence for that, you have provided nothing:

 

A good school provides a balanced education which includes emotional development, if that emotional development is damaged be that because of 2 years off school from covid or any other reason then it also affects the child and their ability to learn, thats why good schools provide pastoral teams with some going further providing counselors and Child Psychologists as in my daughters school.

Edited by Bkk Brian
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6 minutes ago, Bkk Brian said:

Its everything to do with the topic and quote I mentioned which I have inserted for you below, strategies for coping and promoting emotional health are not outdated just because that paper was written in 2015

 

You said: "If anyone can try and define what "healing children emotionally" means I would be interested to see."

 

I have provided evidence for that, you have provided nothing:

 

A good school provides a balanced education which includes emotional development, if that emotional development is damaged be that because of 2 years off school from covid or any other reason then it also affects the child and their ability to learn, thats why good schools provide pastoral teams with some going further providing counselors and Child Psychologists as in my daughters school.

You say a good school. Well I reckon they're the minority here. Most schools will just get on with it and that's what I think needs to happen and I'm fairly sure that's what most kids want to happen. Sure tough to be back for both kids and teachers but it's time so let's go. Has educational and emotional development been damaged? To say either way must at this stage be pure speculation. No counselors or child psycholigists at the school I teach at nor my daughters school. 

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7 minutes ago, dinsdale said:

You say a good school. Well I reckon they're the minority here. Most schools will just get on with it and that's what I think needs to happen and I'm fairly sure that's what most kids want to happen. Sure tough to be back for both kids and teachers but it's time so let's go. Has educational and emotional development been damaged? To say either way must at this stage be pure speculation. No counselors or child psycholigists at the school I teach at nor my daughters school. 

Refer to my first post in this string, just about covers the circle you've made

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