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Malaria from monkeys – warning issued


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By Editor

 

Warnings are being issued to keep away from southern and eastern Thailand forests after finding populations of monkeys suffering from malaria.

 

The warning from the Disease Control Department in Bangkok comes after human infections surged by 10 times the usual number, with interactions with primates understood to be the leading cause.

 

A total of 70 cases of Plasmodium Knowlesi Malaria were reported between last October and the end of March, compared to only 10 cases in the entire year before.

 

Dr. Opart Karnkawinpong from the Disease Control Department said that health professionals are yet to determine whether the deadly parasite — which causes fever, chills and loss of appetite among other symptoms — can be spread from human to human.

 

Known carriers include crab-eating macaques, pig-tailed macaques, stump-tailed macaques, Rhesus macaques, and Assamese macaques.

 

Individuals who experience any symptoms and have a history of touching the monkeys in the southern provinces of Ranong and Songkhla and the eastern province of Trat have been advised to seek immediate medical attention.

 

At-risk people, including tourists, workers and people living in the forest, have also been asked to take preventative action against mosquito bites by wearing tight clothing, applying mosquito repellent and sleeping under mosquito nets.

 

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-- © Copyright Royal Coast Review 2022-06-28
 

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23 minutes ago, webfact said:

At-risk people, including tourists, workers and people living in the forest, have also been asked to take preventative action against mosquito bites by wearing tight clothing, applying mosquito repellent and sleeping under mosquito nets.

Tight clothing? I would have thought loose fitting clothing would offer more protection. Surely a mosquito could more easily bite through tight clothing.than loose.

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I guess if you hang out with monkeys, it does increase the chances.

 

Though humans are more of a threat, one would think, as most people hang out with them a wee bit more.

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that looks like more like an out brake, if infections rose from 10 to some 140 (projected for 12 months). 

Warning about touching monkeys or worry that malaria can spread between humans are nonsense, no point of scaring people with imagined dangers. Malaria is spread only by mosquito.

There are many anti-malaria medicines over the counter, starting with doxycicline. Also quinine and chloroquinine.  

Out brake in Trat is on Koh Chang, with over 10 cases. That is a touristy island and many monkeys close to homes, as it's a national park. The rest 60 cases were in 2 provinces with small tourist inflow, they were locals living close to jungle.

Definitely authorities should solve problem of monkeys on Koh Chang, putting to sleep those infected and moving the rest into deep jungle and inhabited islands. Medicines for malaria can be given in food. Even some medicines to make them infertile. That would be disaster for koh chang tourism if this out brake is not contained.

Looks like reaction there to disease is too slow.

That article if from May. There were many cases already in March.

https://thethaiger.com/news/national/11-malaria-patients-found-in-thailands-east-blood-from-monkeys-on-koh-chang-tested

Edited by internationalism
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7 hours ago, phetphet said:

Tight clothing? I would have thought loose fitting clothing would offer more protection. Surely a mosquito could more easily bite through tight clothing.than loose.

In order for a mosquito to make contact with skin under clothing, the fabric must be skintight or close fitting, such as yoga pants, lightweight undershirts, or tights.

If you’re wearing loose clothing made from an impenetrable fabric, mosquitoes won’t be able to bite you unless they’re able to get into the garment.

So no, mosquitoes do not bite in the regular sense of the word, but neither does it sting. So 'bite' is used for convenience. It is only the female that bites, because it is only the female mosquito that needs your protein for its eggs! And mosquitoes suck!  

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This is old news. I recall working in Malaysia in the 80s and being warned that some monkeys can carry malaria.

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I guess that they are just reporting on every disease out there that “disappeared during Covid and now are magically back. 👏😂

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Firstly I would ask how is the malaria transmitted by monkey. I would have thought it would be monkey malaria but transmitted through the normal vectors I.e mosquitoes. If from "monkey interactions" question 2 would be how close are people getting to these monkeys? And what is the nature of these interactions?  Too much monkey business perhaps?

  Cant trust the karnts first it was the Pox now they bringing the malaria. 

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1 hour ago, starky said:

Firstly I would ask how is the malaria transmitted by monkey. I would have thought it would be monkey malaria but transmitted through the normal vectors I.e mosquitoes. If from "monkey interactions" question 2 would be how close are people getting to these monkeys? And what is the nature of these interactions?  Too much monkey business perhaps?

  Cant trust the karnts first it was the Pox now they bringing the malaria. 

Probably getting bitten by infected monkey, but even then that monkey would have be bleeding from her mouth. That would be rare event. Saliva doesn't carry malaria, nor any other body fluids. 
Malaria pre-pandemic was coming to thailand from infected migrant workers from neighbouring countries. Probably thats why only 10 malaria cases in 2021. 
 

monkey malaria pre-dates the Pox b half a year, sharp rise in infections from October 2021, later connected to transmission from monkey areas. 
Probably because of the ongoing omicron it was not reported wildly, as still a very small scale. It came to light only in May. 
they should do a national prevention program for malaria in monkeys, at least in those 3 provinces, otherwise it would spread wider. There are medicines, down to drastic measures culling infected herds. 

there is drug resistant malaria which originated from north east around surin and spread north-east to cambodia, laos and vietnam in a territorial shape of crescent, there was an article about it on the bbc some 5 years ago. Still, it's a small risk in asia, but potential serious situation when it spreads with travellers to africa. 

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1 hour ago, Orinoco said:

I'm sure the Thai's have a lot natural immunity from this.

Not likely, as there are several different strains and they are mutating, some pf them became drug resistant. There are many antimalarial drugs, some 10-20 of them. But prevention is needed by vaccination, that one is worked on but not ready. Malaria was a serious problem in SE asia up to the last century, when modern drugs appear. Doesn't mean that thai have natural immunity, risk is the same to expats, tourists as for thai, if they live in those 3 provinces and close to monkeys

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