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Thai justice minister praises narcotics law change: LESS yaba around but more marijuana; don't take it abroad


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57 minutes ago, cnx101 said:

Agree except yaba makes them crazy and do attack other people and do a lot of damage, opium should also be legal, Sherlock Holmes used to smoke it haha

The only drug I take is caffeine in my coffee, and Sherlock couldn't fined his a-- if it was on fire.

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4 hours ago, bobbin said:

The current Justice Minister is obviously of the same view. One might expect, given the relatively easy passage of the removal of Cannabis from the Narcotics Act that it has the support of the "establishment".

It is currently for sale in J Avenue Thong Lor. It doesn't get any more establishment.

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I can't see them ever legalizing the Class A stuff. There would be a lot of policemen out of a job and being transferred if that ever happened. Class C they may legalize more of but they won't with the class As even though its been out of control for decades now. 

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, WinterGael said:

Have a yabba, drive all night.

Like the bus drivers just before they plummet off a mountain.

 

Just talking about the price with the missus this morning - just over 10 baht locally. A close reli is alternating between working for hours in the sun, sleeping for 14 hours or playing on his phone for 4 or 5 hours at a time without moving from a squat. Used to be fairly well built, played soccer, now rake thin. 

Edited by Old Croc
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Yes you could call it that but whether anything will happen, that's another matter. Highly unlikely I'd say. 

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4 hours ago, BritManToo said:

All recreational drugs should be made legal, and therefore cheap.

Let those who want to harm themselves do so, but remove their need to commit crimes against the rest of us.

Without drug profits, criminal gangs will have less impact on society. 

Without drug laws, crime and prison numbers will be reduced.

Agreed, all the evidence from countries that have decriminalised drug use is the police have far less work to do.

Having said that, I would enter the caveat any drug user that commits a crime doesn't get to use the BS excuse they were under the influence of drugs; they get sentenced as if they were stone cold sober.

I am not so sure about meth. It's wrecking rural communities in Australia, and by all accounts it is the most prone among the illicit drugs to induce psychosis and violence, which might have been why the Allies and the Germans in World War II were issuing it like candy. The Germans called it Fliegeshokolade.

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2 hours ago, vandeventer said:

The only drug I take is caffeine in my coffee, and Sherlock couldn't fined his a-- if it was on fire.

You do realize that Holmes is a fictional character. Who he was and what he did was the sole purview of the author. You can't change that.

Throwing shade on a fictional character is silly. Witness Ted Cruz flaming Elmo on Twitter.

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6 hours ago, webfact said:

only 342 million this year. 

In a country of sixty-some-million, he should be proud.

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4 hours ago, BritManToo said:

All recreational drugs should be made legal, and therefore cheap.

Let those who want to harm themselves do so, but remove their need to commit crimes against the rest of us.

Without drug profits, criminal gangs will have less impact on society. 

Without drug laws, crime and prison numbers will be reduced.

And human trafficking should be made legal, and therefore cheap.

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4 hours ago, cnx101 said:

opium should also be legal, Sherlock Holmes used to smoke it haha

Not only that opium was legal in Europe, but England actually forced it on China where it was illegal...

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47 minutes ago, Reposed said:

And human trafficking should be made legal, and therefore cheap.

False equivalence, humans choose to take drugs. They mostly don't choose to be trafficked.

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9 hours ago, webfact said:

Even methamphetamine mixed with caffeine - what Thais call yaba - cases were down with 550 million pills seized last year and only 342 million this year. 

How can seizing a smaller number of pills be judged a successful reduction in drug offence cases? 🙄

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4 hours ago, WinterGael said:

Yabba is an upper, pot a downer.  People use the two for different things.  Have a yabba, drive all night.  Go home and eat a pot cookie to fall asleep. Sad.

Even sadder if you use a pot cookie to drive all night, and yabba to sleep....

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1 hour ago, PETERTHEEATER said:

How can seizing a smaller number of pills be judged a successful reduction in drug offence cases? 🙄

The year isn't over yet, just a little over halfway.

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9 hours ago, BritManToo said:

All recreational drugs should be made legal, and therefore cheap.

Let those who want to harm themselves do so, but remove their need to commit crimes against the rest of us.

Without drug profits, criminal gangs will have less impact on society. 

Without drug laws, crime and prison numbers will be reduced.

I don't have an issue with people doing drugs itself, I have an issue with the crime that goes along with it, depending on the drug.

Sure, it's not much good to lock people up purely for having the drug on them/taking it (if it's in quantities that are obviously for personal consumption, not for dealing), I agree with that sentiment.

But people who are on certain highly addictive drugs, that require them to constantly come up with money to finance their habit, usually turn to either prostitution (that's more women though, but not exclusively) or violent crime in order to finance it.

It starts out with petty crime like thieving, then gradually becomes stuff like robbing people and/or breaking into homes and shops etc. And if they're really itching and someone is trying to be a hero or hardman might get himself stabbed or killed, for not wanting to give up the 30 € he has on him and/or his mobile.

THAT is where my problem lies. I'm an ex junkie (opiates, and because we have a relatively liberal drug rehabilitation policy that allows easy access to a lot of substitution medicines I ultimately got hooked faster and worse on those than on the cheap, boshed up heroin I was buying from the Africans at the subway train station) but I was a comparitively high functioning one (I committed very little crime, and those I allegedly committed I targetted dealers, not random people) who held down full time jobs for years and was mostly able to hide it from his family.

But that's not the case for most. A lot of the people I was "friends" with (more like affiliated co-drug users, in reality, since most people are no longer capable of true friendship when the drug always ends up coming first) or knew are either dead from overdoses, in prison/multiple prison stints behind them, with very few who got clean like myself.

And the vast majority turned to one form of crime or another to finance their drug habit. This is not just true for opiates, but also for meth addicts (which is why it's a lie when American leftists claim that Blacks get harsher drug sentences with Crack, since Whites get punished approximately just as hard, except with the laws regarding Meth... just different strokes...) and certain other drugs.

You can offer as much help and substitution as you want, if people aren't themselves REALLY ready to quit it won't help. In fact many are on much higher doses than they actually need, so they can sell the extra capsules (ie Substitol, which is an opiate substitue prevalent here, that contains wax balls in a capsule that you can cook up, let it cool down so the wax settles on top, remove that, then filter it into a syringe the same you would with heroin) for extra money, creating even more addicts who're not in any program and who get hooked faster due to higher quality and then commit crime to be able to buy more.

I agree that the war on drugs is unlikely to be ever won, but is giving up and liberalizing and decriminalizing hard drugs really an option? I don't care about the marijuana, obviously.

Decent people with decent morals can and will turn into real rats (violent and treacherous), who simply don't give a <deleted>. Not to mention the impact on families, the burned bridges, the deaths, et cetera.

Yes, decriminalizing, liberalizing and maybe even legalizing brings in additional revenue for the state, and sometimes (but not always) drives organized drug traffickers out of business. But there's a cost attached here as well, and I'm not sure it ultimately adds up to less.

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