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Thailand braces for 38-degree heatwave with potential thunderstorms


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Thailand faces a scorching day with temperatures peaking at 38 degrees Celsius and scattered thunderstorms in some areas, the Meteorological Department warns. The latest weather forecast anticipates strong southerly and southeasterly winds affecting the northeastern, lower central, and eastern regions of the country, creating the potential for thunderstorms in these areas.

 

In the period from February 24 to February 26, a high-pressure system or cool air mass from China is expected to extend over Vietnam and the South China Sea. Meanwhile, upper Thailand will experience hot weather in many areas. The presence of southerly and southeasterly winds covering the lower northern, northeastern, and central regions, as well as Bangkok and its vicinity, and eastern parts, will lead to thunderstorms, strong gusts, hail in some places, and possible lightning strikes.

 

In the northern region, the upper parts will see cool to cold weather with morning fog, turning hot with clear skies by midday. The lower northern region will have partly cloudy skies with some morning fog, also becoming hot during the day. Minimum temperatures will range from 13 to 23 degrees Celsius, and maximum temperatures will hit 34 to 37 degrees Celsius. Mountain peaks may experience very cold conditions, with lows of 6 to 15 degrees Celsius.

 

The northeastern region will experience cool temperatures in the upper areas with some morning fog, heating up during the day.

 

Thunderstorms are expected in about 10% of the region, mainly in Chaiyaphum, Nakhon Ratchasima, Buri Ram, and Surin. Minimum temperatures will range from 20 to 26 degrees Celsius, and maximum temperatures will be between 36 and 38 degrees Celsius.

 

Again, higher altitudes will be cooler, with minimum temperatures of 15 to 18 degrees Celsius, reported KhaoSod.


For the central region, hot daytime weather will be accompanied by thunderstorms in about 10% of the area, predominantly in Lopburi and Saraburi. Temperatures will range from a minimum of 24 to 26 degrees Celsius to a maximum of 35 to 38 degrees Celsius.

 

The eastern region will also experience hot daytime weather, with thunderstorms expected in 10% of the area, mainly in Sa Kaeo, Chon Buri, Chanthaburi, and Trat. Minimum temperatures will range from 23 to 27 degrees Celsius, and maximum temperatures will reach 33 to 38 degrees Celsius. The sea will have waves less than 1 metre high, but in stormy areas, waves could be higher than 1 metre.

 

Hot weather

 

In the southern region (east coast), hot weather during the day will be accompanied by thunderstorms in about 10% of the area, particularly in Phetchaburi, Prachuap Khiri Khan, Chumphon, and Surat Thani. The temperature will vary from a low of 22 to 25 degrees Celsius to a high of 31 to 38 degrees Celsius. The sea will see waves about 1 metre high, increasing beyond 1 metre in stormy conditions.


On the southern region’s west coast, areas including Ranong, Phang-nga, Phuket, and Krabi will experience hot daytime weather with thunderstorms in about 10% of the region. Minimum temperatures will be between 24 and 26 degrees Celsius, and maximum temperatures will range from 34 to 37 degrees Celsius. Sea waves will stay below 1 metre in distance from the shore but can exceed 1 metre during storms.

 

Bangkok and its vicinity will not be spared from the heat, with hot daytime conditions and the likelihood of thunderstorms in about 10% of the area. The mercury will range from a minimum of 26 to 27 degrees Celsius to a maximum of 34 to 37 degrees Celsius.

 

Citizens are advised to stay hydrated and to stay indoors during the hottest parts of the day, while also being prepared for sudden weather changes.

 

by Nattapong Westwood

Picture courtesy of lifeforstock, Freepik

 

Source: The Thaiger 2024-02-22

 

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Seems it could force people to use a lot of electricity for fans and air conditioning, leading to the government saying they can’t keep up with supply as they weren’t expecting this uptick in energy use.

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I don't have an a/c yet.... But it's getting to be a very tempting proposition. 

 

36 in my room last night and all the fan does is ensure you stay hot!  A spray bottle of water helped a bit. 

 

From what I've read on the forums, inverter a/c's are the way to go

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1 hour ago, Korat Kiwi said:

I don't have an a/c yet.... But it's getting to be a very tempting proposition. 

 

36 in my room last night and all the fan does is ensure you stay hot!  A spray bottle of water helped a bit. 

 

From what I've read on the forums, inverter a/c's are the way to go

How long have you lived here?  99% of the Thais don't have AC in my area but I have a unit in every room.  I wonder if I could adjust?  Doubt it and the cool air hitting my chest as I type is wonderful.  I ran on the track near my home at 8am and that was sweltering and couldn't imagine going back to my home to experience more of the same.

 

You are tougher than me!

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28 minutes ago, still kicking said:

I don't see what the fuss is all about where I live, we had 10 days 40 plus then it cooled down to 38 I don't have an aircon and never use a fan.

I could Definately survive but it would a major sacrifice.  My wife rarely complains and prefers to do her thing outside in the shade.  She tells me it is hot but at the same time seems very happy. Maybe it is a state of mind thing...

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24 minutes ago, atpeace said:

How long have you lived here?  99% of the Thais don't have AC in my area but I have a unit in every room.  I wonder if I could adjust?  Doubt it and the cool air hitting my chest as I type is wonderful.  I ran on the track near my home at 8am and that was sweltering and couldn't imagine going back to my home to experience more of the same.

 

You are tougher than me!

I spent 7+ years in Chiang Mai before returning to NZ for 5 years. 

 

I've been in Korat for just 3 months and are still getting use to the heat. It's a struggle I must admit but funnily enough the evenings with a few beers seem to becoming more enjoyable! 

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13 minutes ago, John Drake said:

Take three or four cold showers when the days are hot. That helps a great deal, and it's what many Thais do to cope.

Not the Thais in my area or for that matter in the places I've lived the last 25 years.  I have heard what you stated many times on this forum but never have i seen it.  Out of the thousands of Thais I've been around, I would think I would have noticed this excessive showering. 

 

I myself am an excessive shower type and you are right - it is refreshing.  I'm currently at number 2 and expect to be at 3-4 before sunset.

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3 minutes ago, atpeace said:

Partly my fault caused my witty budget plan. 25k-30K(can't remember) was put in an account each month for household and food outlays and the remainder at the end of the month  could use as she pleased. 

Toyed with that idea.....but I just haven't got b***s to even suggest it.....555

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3 hours ago, Korat Kiwi said:

I don't have an a/c yet.... But it's getting to be a very tempting proposition. 

 

36 in my room last night and all the fan does is ensure you stay hot!  A spray bottle of water helped a bit. 

 

From what I've read on the forums, inverter a/c's are the way to go

Korat is a pretty hot place in Thailand often with little breeze,it's going to get hotter still over next few months. 

Yes an inverter Aircon unit is the way to go. From experience and others recommendations start with mitsubishi brand. Daikin also is highly rated. 

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3 hours ago, Korat Kiwi said:

I don't have an a/c yet.... But it's getting to be a very tempting proposition. 

 

36 in my room last night and all the fan does is ensure you stay hot!  A spray bottle of water helped a bit. 

 

From what I've read on the forums, inverter a/c's are the way to go

OMG.....if the lecky goes off in the night I panic......I'd go and sit in the car if I had to....

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4 hours ago, still kicking said:

I don't see what the fuss is all about where I live, we had 10 days 40 plus then it cooled down to 38 I don't have an aircon and never use a fan.

I bet you can lift heavy things too.....................................:stoner:

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4 hours ago, atpeace said:

Not the Thais in my area or for that matter in the places I've lived the last 25 years.  I have heard what you stated many times on this forum but never have i seen it.  Out of the thousands of Thais I've been around, I would think I would have noticed this excessive showering. 

 

I myself am an excessive shower type and you are right - it is refreshing.  I'm currently at number 2 and expect to be at 3-4 before sunset.

 

I haven't seen anything either, but my wife says it's popular in her village. For myself, it seems to cool things down for at least an hour before the effect wears off.

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I have aircon but choose not to use it. Instead, I employ a Punkhawallah and pay him an appallingly low wage. Sometimes, I will put on a coat just for a laugh and make him work even harder to keep me cool.

 

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Good if there are few showers with wind hopefully, as the air quality in Thailand and mainly Bangkok and south bound around Hua Hin is regularly reaching alarming toxic levels that go beyond the WHO norms. If Thailand does not take drastic steps to reduce private cars in urban areas, in 10 to 20 years, people will need gas masks before hitting the streets in Hua Hin or Bangkok.

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On 2/22/2024 at 12:10 PM, atpeace said:

I could Definately survive but it would a major sacrifice.  My wife rarely complains and prefers to do her thing outside in the shade.  She tells me it is hot but at the same time seems very happy. Maybe it is a state of mind thing...

Sure is ,If you on't mind it doesn't matter. Just takes time to climatise.

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On 2/22/2024 at 12:19 PM, John Drake said:

Take three or four cold showers when the days are hot. That helps a great deal, and it's what many Thais do to cope.

A great plan but the government water was cut off last week and my wife tells me that it "should" come back on in the next 2 or 3 weeks.

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On 2/23/2024 at 2:07 PM, billd766 said:

A great plan but the government water was cut off last week and my wife tells me that it "should" come back on in the next 2 or 3 weeks.

Where are you pooping?  The Mekhong river is 50 meters away from me so it would be better than most.  I've had a few nightmares of water and electric being cut simultaneously and woke up sobbing.

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4 hours ago, atpeace said:

Where are you pooping?  The Mekhong river is 50 meters away from me so it would be better than most.  I've had a few nightmares of water and electric being cut simultaneously and woke up sobbing.

Upstairs, as we had the septic tank emptied a couple of weeks ago.

 

I am following the old saying,

 

If its yellow, let it mellow.

If its brown, flush it down.

 

The government water was still of at 4pm, but it was back at 5pm. For how long??????

 

People (including my wife laughed at me a few years ago when I moved the 6 ongs to a slab behind the kitchen and added 14 more and cross connected all 20. I added another 6 more several years later but they are isolated from the others.

 

There is a klong across the road, but I think you can walk across it in a few places now and not get your feet wet.

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