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Thai baht expected to weaken against US dollar


webfact

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I sincerely hope not. I am enjoying this exchange rate on my SS paid here. But I can't decide who has the weaker currency really. If US rates come down, so will the currency. If Thai rates come down so will the currency. You then have state of the nation......US in an awful pickle what with provoking wars to break out everywhere, and the tax payer has to pay for them and a deficit of $1 trillion this year so, $3 trillion forecast for this year. Thailand in a smaller pickle, but a pickle being created by a mindless baboon who dreams up new expensive gimmicks every day and never ever finishes a job.

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Pity the $Aus isn't where it was 20 years ago. 32/34 or about to baht. It has been strenghtening somewhat against the Baht but still around Bt10 less.

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If anyone can tell me why every currency seemed to plummet - apart from the dollar - last week against the baht the day after they announced the baht was the worst performing currency in asia without mentioning manipulation by the powers that be, I would appreciate it !

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13 minutes ago, spidermike007 said:

May it continue and may the baht drop another 20%.

Of course that would mean higher prices in Thailand for all imported goods ...

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17 minutes ago, mfd101 said:

Of course that would mean higher prices in Thailand for all imported goods ...

 

Yes, are you worried about your expense for imported spam, or ALL the other stuff you buy that is local?

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1 minute ago, CanadaSam said:

 

Yes, are you worried about your expense for imported spam, or ALL the other stuff you buy that is local?

I'm not worried about it at all. I merely note that people rabbit on about how wunnerful it is when the baht drops against their home currency, apparently ignorant that there is - in slightly slower time - a negative effect too.

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Just now, mfd101 said:

I'm not worried about it at all. I merely note that people rabbit on about how wunnerful it is when the baht drops against their home currency, apparently ignorant that there is - in slightly slower time - a negative effect too.

yes the price of oil being a classic example - and I am not referring just to the fuel for transport.

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1 hour ago, Mike Lister said:

Historically, now is about as good as it gets. If me, I'd at least trade 50% and then wait on the remainder to see what happens next,

 

Pound Cost averaging is our friend as always albeit USD in this case

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13 minutes ago, CanadaSam said:

ALL the other stuff you buy that is local?

Local stuff is leass than 20% of what I buy. Holidays go overseas now as we all should minimize remittances.

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40 minutes ago, RichardColeman said:

If anyone can tell me why every currency seemed to plummet - apart from the dollar - last week against the baht the day after they announced the baht was the worst performing currency in asia without mentioning manipulation by the powers that be, I would appreciate it !

 

Because lol there are two pairings to every exchange conversion apart from the USD which as the Worlds reserve currency has direct exchange rate with every worldwide currency

 

Movement in either pairing (for those not holding USD) effects the bottom line

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My concern is bringing USD into Thailand from my USA savings account because of the new taxing of foreign money coming into a Thai bank account regulation that started January, 2024, i.e., paying taxes in 2025 for money transferred into Thailand during 2024.  I am a Thai tax resident, and as I work in Thailand, I do file a Thai tax return every year.  The money in my USA savings account was already previously taxed in the USA because it was money I earned in the USA over a period of years.  

 

But as no one seems to know -- including myself -- what this new regulation (or new interpretation of an old regulation) from the Thai RD really means, again, I'm leery of transferring any USD into Thailand.  But, perhaps, I'm missing the boat somewhere.

 

 

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44 minutes ago, jayjay2001 said:

My concern is bringing USD into Thailand from my USA savings account because of the new taxing of foreign money coming into a Thai bank account regulation that started January, 2024, i.e., paying taxes in 2025 for money transferred into Thailand during 2024.  I am a Thai tax resident, and as I work in Thailand, I do file a Thai tax return every year.  The money in my USA savings account was already previously taxed in the USA because it was money I earned in the USA over a period of years.  

 

But as no one seems to know -- including myself -- what this new regulation (or new interpretation of an old regulation) from the Thai RD really means, again, I'm leery of transferring any USD into Thailand.  But, perhaps, I'm missing the boat somewhere.

 

 

Any income earned before 1 January 2024 is free of Thai tax, when remitted to Thailand.

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Americans thinking of doing any big transfers into Thailand to take advantage of the current currency exchange rates also need to keep in mind that they may trigger additional U.S. government reporting requirements under the FBAR program (for more than $10K held in foreign accounts) and separately under the FATCA program for foreign financial assets totaling various larger amounts, depending on marital status and other details.

 

 

 

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Confiscation (theft) of Russian USD assets, about to be passed by the US Senate, will be the final straw for the greenback.  Many BRICS countries (being a bit less than 50% of world population and GDP) are already gun shy of the dollar after US weaponized it two years ago by sanctioning the Russkies. Probably the biggest foreign policy blunder ever made by the US, and given their track record, that's saying something!

 

This has only accelerated the development of BRICS and member states have been bailing from the dollar into gold ever since.  The USD's days as the reserve currency are numbered. One day very soon there will be a T-Bill auction and buyers either won't front up, or bang on a huge tail premium that will drastically increase the debt servicing of 34T+ debt.

 

Printing USD and exporting inflation (as well as producing munitions that get destroyed and then building more munitions to boost the economy) since Bretton Woods is fine when there is foreign demand for the currency. Different story when supply outstrips demand because 50% of the world's economies gave the middle finger to the greenback.

 

We may see the US become the new Venezuela, or worse, the new Un-united Kingdom.:coffee1:

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10 minutes ago, Gsxrnz said:

Confiscation (theft) of Russian USD assets, about to be passed by the US Senate, will be the final straw for the greenback.  Many BRICS countries (being a bit less than 50% of world population and GDP) are already gun shy of the dollar after US weaponized it two years ago by sanctioning the Russkies. Probably the biggest foreign policy blunder ever made by the US, and given their track record, that's saying something!

 

This has only accelerated the development of BRICS and member states have been bailing from the dollar into gold ever since.  The USD's days as the reserve currency are numbered. One day very soon there will be a T-Bill auction and buyers either won't front up, or bang on a huge tail premium that will drastically increase the debt servicing of 34T+ debt.

 

Printing USD and exporting inflation (as well as producing munitions that get destroyed and then building more munitions to boost the economy) since Bretton Woods is fine when there is foreign demand for the currency. Different story when supply outstrips demand because 50% of the world's economies gave the middle finger to the greenback.

 

We may see the US become the new Venezuela, or worse, the new Un-united Kingdom.:coffee1:

I see China's gold buying efforts as a different agenda to USD value. I think China has seen what the US has done to Russia by freezing their USD assets and are determined not to be caught out the same way, if they decide to do something that displeases the West. So I don't see that as a lack of confidence in USD, I think it's more about developing a Plan B for the future.

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