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IKEA kitchen assembly DIY or let them do it?


OneMoreFarang
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I intend to buy an IKEA METOD kitchen.

Now the question is if I should let them assemble it or do it myself (with other people for support).

 

My question is how difficult the work is. I assembled already other IKEA furniture and that was fine.

 

I have not much trust in many Thai technicians. I am sure they will be able to build the kitchen. But I worry that they use too much power on the screws so that they are lose again and things like that. The kitchen should be stable for many years, and I don't want to have trouble later.

 

I have the tools and in principle I am sure I will be able to put things together. But I didn't do that 100 times like the IKEA teams. I worry a little about the exact alignments of doors and drawers and things like that. It seems to be not easy to get this right.

 

What is your experience with IKEA and their teams building kitchens? Do they do quality work or just rush the job?

And what is your experience with assembling IKEA kitchens or other furniture? Did everything go right? Did you wish you would have asked them to do it.

 

Obviously I have to pay if they assemble it. This is not the issue here. I am willing to pay if they do quality work. That is what I am concerned about.

 

What is your experience?

 

 

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A tricky one. I've installed 6+ Howden kitchens over the years, and time and patience is best.

Key is getting the overall design right so plumbing, electrical and gas services are in-situ before assembly. That way any drilling through the shells is under your control or logic, seen many kitchen fitters drill "their standard holes" for plumbing and waste services to big, which reduces the rigidity of the shell, plus looks unsightly. Also, (Personal preferance) you have accessable isolation switches for the key appliances. Standard in the UK, not so standard out here. Only isolation switch for my hob is the breaker in the DP!

Top-tip, use a backing batten when fixing / aligning the floor standing units to the supporting wall. You'll need to notch the back corners of the units if they don't come notched for the batten. 

If you haven't got one, then recommend purchasing a multi-tool. Also a 2m (standard units 600mm, so 2m covers 3 units) level to stretch across your base cabinets to ensure they are level / in line.

Also if installing granite / marble worktops, then ensure you have the shells built & leveled first, that way the counter tops can be positioned / installed by your worktop supplier. Had an issue on one kitchen, had to leave the granite tops off for a couple of days, when came to installing there was a crack, so consequently had to take the hit as wasn't installed by them. Also if installing a ceramic sink, then ensure installed with the worktop installers involved, again incase any cracks appear.

The one job I do hate is the telescopic extractor hood. So try to get the electrican to do this.

 

If you're tall, (ie you're personally  going to be using the kitchen), ensure you have decent adjustable legs to raise the shell height, or be prepared to use blocks under the supports to raise the height. Would also mean you'll need a customised plinth board. I've found the local kitchens give be back ache after 15 minutes due to their low heights.

Also ensure you install a P-Trap on the kitchen sick, nothing worst then hearing the gurgling of next doors washing machine or general plumbing.

Personally, I'll do it myself. Great feeling afterwards of "I did this". Especially if you've installed under counter or in cupboard lights. 

Best of luck.

 

 

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59 minutes ago, RayWright said:

A tricky one. I've installed 6+ Howden kitchens over the years, and time and patience is best.

Key is getting the overall design right so plumbing, electrical and gas services are in-situ before assembly. That way any drilling through the shells is under your control or logic, seen many kitchen fitters drill "their standard holes" for plumbing and waste services to big, which reduces the rigidity of the shell, plus looks unsightly. Also, (Personal preferance) you have accessable isolation switches for the key appliances. Standard in the UK, not so standard out here. Only isolation switch for my hob is the breaker in the DP!

Top-tip, use a backing batten when fixing / aligning the floor standing units to the supporting wall. You'll need to notch the back corners of the units if they don't come notched for the batten. 

If you haven't got one, then recommend purchasing a multi-tool. Also a 2m (standard units 600mm, so 2m covers 3 units) level to stretch across your base cabinets to ensure they are level / in line.

Also if installing granite / marble worktops, then ensure you have the shells built & leveled first, that way the counter tops can be positioned / installed by your worktop supplier. Had an issue on one kitchen, had to leave the granite tops off for a couple of days, when came to installing there was a crack, so consequently had to take the hit as wasn't installed by them. Also if installing a ceramic sink, then ensure installed with the worktop installers involved, again incase any cracks appear.

The one job I do hate is the telescopic extractor hood. So try to get the electrican to do this.

 

If you're tall, (ie you're personally  going to be using the kitchen), ensure you have decent adjustable legs to raise the shell height, or be prepared to use blocks under the supports to raise the height. Would also mean you'll need a customised plinth board. I've found the local kitchens give be back ache after 15 minutes due to their low heights.

Also ensure you install a P-Trap on the kitchen sick, nothing worst then hearing the gurgling of next doors washing machine or general plumbing.

Personally, I'll do it myself. Great feeling afterwards of "I did this". Especially if you've installed under counter or in cupboard lights. 

Best of luck.

Thanks for the detailed advice.

Currently I am more on the DIY side, but I haven't made up my mind until now.

 

The funniest part of your reply is this: "The one job I do hate is the telescopic extractor hood. So try to get the electrican to do this."

Almost anything in my apartment is done by the contractor. With one exception: I do the electrical installation. 😉 The contractor agreed already he will do the exhaust part of the hood. 

 

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4 minutes ago, thaibeachlovers said:

What language are the instructions in?

English.

And up to now I think they are clear and with lots of pictures.

But obviously I don't want to find out later on that I should have done xyz which was not written in the manual. 

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17 minutes ago, scubascuba3 said:

Instructions only tell you how to assemble units, doesn't tell you the complicated stuff

I looked this video series. It covers lots of details. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, OneMoreFarang said:

I looked this video series. It covers lots of details. 

 

Looks good, just watched the 1st video, agree; plenty of detail. However would use raw plugs when fixing to the wall, especially if going into plasterboard. Video implied was screwed into the stub wall battens, however these aren't always 30cm. Seen wall cupboards slip if not fixed securely, especially in damp / humid locations.  Also if packing the batten (wall not straight), I would use plastic packers, not cardboardy type as used in the video (damp/humid conditions, also splashbacks aren't necessary 100% water barriers (sink area).

As you're the sparky, I take it you know the chased wall locations of cables, else use a stud/electrical/metal finder. Bosch are good.

Good luck.

Look forward to the finished pic.

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from your concerns do it yourself
don't assume the fitters have done it 100 times, this is rarely ever the case
everything i have had installed has either been asembled incorrectly or would have been if i was not there to direct
and nothing worse than over tightened screws, which fitters will always do
if any is chipboard or mdf it is a big concern
i always finish tightneing screws in wood/board etc by hand

i had a kitchen fitted by kitchzko, which i have had to later remove my stone countertop to fix the breakfast bar

The standard i have come to expect is the same as if i have a first bash at it myself whatever the task is.
the difference when you do yourself is you can correct yourself as you go.

as for the hood most of them come with plugs these days
i just fitted mine, only time consuming part was cutting a near perfect hole the brick wall,
the rest was just 4 screws in the wall

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An absolute no brainer..... 100% Get them to do it... 

 

We had a had an extension and full kitchen installed a couple of years ago. 

 

The IKEA kitchen was installed by IKEA...  the only thing they didnt do was the countertop. 

I realised the outsource from Boonthavorn with a 2x markup - so I ordered the same countertop from Boonthavorn and they came later to install the countertop. 

 

Both IKEA and Boonthavorn did a a professional and neat job. 

 

(a lot more than can be said for the fools who did the actual extension and roof !).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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14 hours ago, OneMoreFarang said:

English.

And up to now I think they are clear and with lots of pictures.

But obviously I don't want to find out later on that I should have done xyz which was not written in the manual. 

I'm not bad at DIY and been doing it all my life, but sometimes I get something with instructions that don't make sense, so have to do it by trial and error.

 

 

BTW, in a previous life when I had a house in NZ I had a professionally made kitchen installed. The kitchen itself had some defects that I didn't pick up till too late ( so check everything before installed ) and the builders that the kitchen maker sent were cowboys. I had to redo everything they had done ( which was when I started doing things myself ). They couldn't even put up a wall that was vertical. I also had to sack the electrician they brought and get my own instead.

The <deleted> had the cheek to comeback later and ask if they could take photos. Luckily I wasn't there at the time, but my partner had to tell them that nothing they had done was still there.

 

Another time I had some alterations done, and the builder sent a "plasterer" to finish the wall board gaps, but he only did half the job ( very badly ) and never came back, so I learned to plaster myself.

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11 hours ago, Muhendis said:

Instructions?

More fun to build it first then look at the instructions to see what to do with the three screws left over. 🙂

LOL. Last thing I put together actually had more fasteners supplied than needed. Luckily the instructions specified the number needed, so I knew I had surplus.

What is really annoying is to take something apart to fix it and THEN find some left over screws when assembled again.

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12 hours ago, patman30 said:

and nothing worse than over tightened screws, which fitters will always do
if any is chipboard or mdf it is a big concern
i always finish tightneing screws in wood/board etc by hand

Good advice.

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Thanks for all your advice and comments.

 

Now I am pretty sure I will do it myself.

Yesterday I spoke with a friend who just got a 70,000B sofa delivered, which had to be assembled in his home. My friend was shocked by their incompetence and their attitude that they just don't care.

 

I guess it is possible to have good luck with the assembly people, but it seems to be really a question of luck.

 

I will read the instructions carefully before I begin and watch some more videos about it. There are lots of them on YouTube. I am sure I will take longer than a team from IKEA but I am also sure I will do it more carefully.

 

I guess I will order the kitchen in maybe two week. IKEA has a good computer program and competent people in their shop to help to select all the necessary parts.

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15 hours ago, richard_smith237 said:

the only thing they didnt do was the countertop.

i forgot to mention this
i had a nightmare with kitchzko trying to rip us off with the countertop
had to get lawyers involved for refund, apperently lots of similar complaints according to staff at Homepro
and then i bought stone and had it fitted by my builders (who also do work for boonthavorn)

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3 hours ago, Pmbkk said:

Simple - let them do it but watch over them !

In theory I could do that. But I am not sure I have the patience.

If they do a good job, then that is obviously fine.

But if they rush and/or do a bad job then what? Tell them to do it again? And this will take hours, maybe even more than a day. I don't think I want to sit there and watch and get more headache every few minutes.

 

And I can also understand the point of view of the people who do the work. If I do something and someone watches constantly over my shoulder and tells me what I should do differently I get annoyed and stressed and that definitely doesn't help.

 

Just for the record: I saw some people work, also in Thailand, who do a fantastic job. I.e. the guy who does my tiles in the moment does a great job. Sometimes I watch him working and I obviously see the finished product and I think: Wow, what a great job.

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Yesterday I sent an email to IKEA and asked them what happens if I try to assemble things and then I change my mind and like that IKEA does it. Here is their answer:

 

"The department that installs kitchen sets will install only products that have not yet been assembled. and will install the whole set."

 

 

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2 hours ago, OneMoreFarang said:

Yesterday I sent an email to IKEA and asked them what happens if I try to assemble things and then I change my mind and like that IKEA does it.

Seems like a reasonable policy.

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6 hours ago, Pmbkk said:

 

Simple - let them do it but watch over them !

I don't think that the act of watching over their shoulder is a good advice.

I think it comes from situations when dealing with part-time farmers - jacks of all trades and masters of none.

If a tradesman is incompetent to start with then no amount of supervision will make much of a difference, unless you're dealing with complete frauds who should be fired immediately upon discovery. (been there done that)

A competent tradesman might actually take offense in your constant monitoring and will never come back again.

Edited by unheard
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3 hours ago, OneMoreFarang said:

Sometimes I watch him working and I obviously see the finished product and I think: Wow, what a great job.

How could it be?

You're surely mistaken...

According to this forum's consensus good tradesmen are impossible to find. 🤔😉

Edited by unheard
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57 minutes ago, unheard said:
3 hours ago, OneMoreFarang said:

Sometimes I watch him working and I obviously see the finished product and I think: Wow, what a great job.

How could it be?

You're surely mistaken...

According to this forum's consensus good tradesmen are impossible to find. 🤔😉

Edited 32 minutes ago by unheard

good tradesmen are not completely impossible to find, they are just really really difficult, so the wise keep the knowledge and hope that they will be available next time.

An example is this concept drawing 179619C8-7E22-41B0-AC36-E46957458A91.thumb.jpeg.193123f1bb50ed0abd04fc806d43d140.jpeg

that  became this model 

ED66629F-46DF-431E-8421-4743FF266C9F.jpeg.6247ea28beeb538cc38ffe45bfbd705b.jpeg

and the finished project

 

411A6DA6-0FB3-4C53-BACD-B75A131EA56E.jpeg.a04aa8af201b130c0c7adbe1b241b734.jpeg
 

More details for those who want

Edited by sometimewoodworker
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