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Heat Exhaustion or Heat Stroke


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The worst parts of this are.

 

1. The Thais don't get it very often due to skin pigmentation. And they will think you are drunk if you show up with a serious case at ER.

 

2. It can have lifelong serious consequences like permanent organ and brain damage.

 

After I had it I read all the forums I could and there were people who still had health problems from it after many years after the event.

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Please remember there is a big difference between heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

 

Heat exhaustion you can normally deal with yourself, but heat exhaustion requires medical care and attention.

 

“If left untreated, heatstroke can instantly damage multiple organs, including brain, heart, kidneys and muscles. In case that the treatment is delayed, the damage worsens, increasing risk of serious complications, long-term disability or even death.”

 

https://www.bangkokinternationalhospital.com/health-articles/disease-treatment/hot-weather-must-be-careful-of-heatstroke

 

The same easy preventative measures will help avoid both, drink plenty of water, not alcohol, avoid dehydration, wear light coloured loose clothing, think about time of day when exercising or working in the heat.

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Been pumping water into my UK grandkids for the last couple of weeks, they really don't realise just how much they need to drink in these temperatures!

 

Stay safe everyone!

 

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12 minutes ago, cooked said:

Drinking water to excess is not the solution. The water will flush away those electrolytes you need to stay safe, so take care to find a solution. This is a problem well known to sports physicians and came to their notice during long endurance runs when athletes were collapsing and sometimes dying.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hyponatremia/symptoms-causes/syc-20373711#:~:text=Overview,in and around your cells.

I'm 76 and ran my slow and easy 10 K this morning, after taking electrolytes (and coffee!), 28°C, 78% humidity. 15 K tomorrow.


Excellent point, and something I also said in another thread a few days ago, only to be told by one poster that electrolytes are just an advertising con.

 

https://aseannow.com/topic/1324447-heat-wave-be-careful-out-there/

 

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26 minutes ago, JimTripper said:

The weird thing about it is that you don't realize it at the time. You just want to keep walking. You start feeling dizzy and a little giddy. Your hands swell up a bit. Hats are not enough, you need an umbrella.

Those Chinese girls walking around with umbrellas to protect themselves from getting any tans on their white skin are the smart ones. We all used to think in the past that they were weird.

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1 hour ago, Crossy said:

Been pumping water into my UK grandkids for the last couple of weeks, they really don't realise just how much they need to drink in these temperatures!

 

Stay safe everyone!

 

Good idea. Less food here, more liquid.

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1 minute ago, rexpotter said:

A strange bit true fact. Didn't make sense, but too much waster washes out the good bacteria.

That's why they hook up an IV with sodium plus other things in your veins.

Edited by rexpotter
typo
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Some people might think that IV rehydration fluids are just water, however an IV rehydration mixture is specifically formulated for quick absorption and maximum hydration. It's typically a saline solution which may also contain nutrients such as glucose, dextrose and electrolytes.

 

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1 hour ago, cooked said:

Drinking water to excess is not the solution. The water will flush away those electrolytes you need to stay safe, so take care to find a solution. This is a problem well known to sports physicians and came to their notice during long endurance runs when athletes were collapsing and sometimes dying.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hyponatremia/symptoms-causes/syc-20373711#:~:text=Overview,in and around your cells.

I'm 76 and ran my slow and easy 10 K this morning, after taking electrolytes (and coffee!), 28°C, 78% humidity. 15 K tomorrow.

Amazing

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3 minutes ago, rexpotter said:

A strange bit true fact. Didn't make sense, but too much waster washes out the good bacteria.

 

I personally know that I always sweat a lot, so I drink warm water, not cold, mixed with some electrolytes, as I can drink it quicker, to replace my fluid levels, just suits me the best.
 

My past profession did not allow for light weight loose clothing, so I developed strategies on how to hydrate myself, to prevent the problems occurring, and have used that for living with hot spells.


I know my own bodies and how best to hydrate myself to suit the temperature and what I am going to be doing. No hard and fast rules, but I will be flexible depending on the situation, but I always ensure I drink enough of suitable liquids and electrolytes.

 

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2 hours ago, cooked said:

Drinking water to excess is not the solution. The water will flush away those electrolytes you need to stay safe, so take care to find a solution. This is a problem well known to sports physicians and came to their notice during long endurance runs when athletes were collapsing and sometimes dying.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hyponatremia/symptoms-causes/syc-20373711#:~:text=Overview,in and around your cells.

I'm 76 and ran my slow and easy 10 K this morning, after taking electrolytes (and coffee!), 28°C, 78% humidity. 15 K tomorrow.

It depends on what you mean by "excess". Most medical texts seem to recommend drinking around 2 litres of water a day but obviously that could vary depending on the conditions. If you're sweating more due to the heat, you would presumably need more water.

 

One study into hyponatremia (water toxicity) suggests that drinking 3-4 litres "in a short period" could lead to problems but doesn't define what "a short period" means.

 

Is Drinking 4 Liters of Water a Day Too Much?

 

In contrast, I imagine drinking the same 3-4 litres throughout the course of an entire day in especially hot weather would not be such a problem.

Edited by GroveHillWanderer
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3 hours ago, Crossy said:

Been pumping water into my UK grandkids for the last couple of weeks, they really don't realise just how much they need to drink in these temperatures!

 

Stay safe everyone!

 

 

Anytime I worry about the heat, I just measure my urine output with a stopwatch and a graduated plastic beaker I keep clipped to my belt.

I have done a lot of running and rowing in the HEAT, high heat, and also crew racing in the heat.

I think I know enough about drinking water to maintain my proper fluid intake.

 

HOWEVER, even more important is to ensure you are getting enough and proper electrolytes when sweating buckets.

 

A Case Example:  I once rowed about 12 kilometers from noon to 3 PM  during one of the hottest days in South Florida, near the Everglades, a place called Naples.

 

I had been drinking COPIOUS amounts of tap water, and so dehydration was NOT the issue.

The bottom of the gig was awash with my sweat, maybe a few liters, ...who knows now...because I did not measure it.

 

I began to feel queasy and quite ill, and I knew I was in trouble.

 

I managed to row to a Naples, Fl boathouse which sold powerboats, and where I was able to find a drinks vending machine.

 

Fortunately, the vending machine sold some brand of power-electrolyte-drink.

About one or two minutes after downing a few cans, I felt, almost immediately, better, and even right as rain.

Don't drink that Gatorade Garbage, these days, IMHO...because the formula changed after the company was acquired by some massive beverage corporation.

I don't know which is the best drink, these days, to replace electrolytes lost from excessive sweating in the noon-day sun.

I don't worry much about this...if....I remember to consume enough salt and soy sauce on my food.

I prefer soy sauce to replace electrolyte loss: But, I cannot give you the exact details of electrolytes contained in soy sauce.... (Not until I check after posting this comment).

 

So, keep electrolytes in balance, while replacing fluid loss due to sweating in the heat....is my thinking....

 

Please NOTE:

 

I think, rather than taking a few sips of soy sauce, it might be better to just follow the science, and here is just one of many studies with athletes as subjects of the study:

 

Talking Nunns Tablets, here, whatever they are....

Impact of Nuun Electrolyte Tablets on Fluid Balance in Active Men and Women:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7600513/

 

image.png.6b00072f940f1b1e996b4c73f0672531.png

 

I dunno...because....I always like to cook up my own solutions....

And, I love soy sauce, too!

 

 

 

Edited by GammaGlobulin
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36 minutes ago, GammaGlobulin said:

 

Anytime I worry about the heat, I just measure my urine output with a stopwatch and a graduated plastic beaker I keep clipped to my belt.

I have done a lot of running and rowing in the HEAT, high heat, and also crew racing in the heat.

I think I know enough about drinking water to maintain my proper fluid intake.

What a load of p!ss!

Edited by scottiejohn
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Here are two valuable articles addressing issues concerning hydration and electrolyte balance in athletes training or competing in high-heat environments.

 

As I think I mentioned, my Soy Sauce solution is quite good for replacing what is most often lost through sweating, i.e. sodium.

 

Still, there is much more to the story than this.

For example, for races or exercise lasting less than 30 minutes, hydration during the exercise period will probably not have much effect during this short time period.

In addition, plain tap water, bottled in gallon jugs, to carry aboard one's gig, is good enough...UNLESS....one is rowing for 4 or 5 hours, as I was wont to do, in the rivers behind and below Naples FL.  (If, as I found out, you plan to do any continuous and strenuous workout, such as rowing for 5 hours, from 11:00AM to 4:00PM, on the hottest days that South FL can dish out, then....yes....you might need to resort to replacing lost electrolytes, or face resultant consequences.  But, this eventuality is also discussed in these two articles.  I enjoy strenuous activities during the hottest part of the day, unless the temps get above 37.  I enjoy the feeling of sweat pouring off me, from my head to my thighs, ...don't know why.  Two good articles here, though.)

 

https://extension.usu.edu/nutrition/research/maintaining-hydration-a-guide-for-endurance-runners#:~:text=Being well hydrated is essential,of electrolytes within our bodies.

 

image.png.ecf86f149c2547d24627cf44314958db.png

 

https://www.nyrr.org/run/photos-and-stories/2019/should-i-take-salt-during-a-marathon#:~:text=When running long distances%2C like,but to a lesser extent).

 

image.png.03a100648eb0121e6706102d1e6e3184.png

 

 

So yes...

Watch out for hyponatremia, as I should have, if you plan to row 5 hours in the noon-day sun in South FL....

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, cooked said:

Drinking water to excess is not the solution. The water will flush away those electrolytes you need to stay safe, so take care to find a solution. This is a problem well known to sports physicians and came to their notice during long endurance runs when athletes were collapsing and sometimes dying.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hyponatremia/symptoms-causes/syc-20373711#:~:text=Overview,in and around your cells.

I'm 76 and ran my slow and easy 10 K this morning, after taking electrolytes (and coffee!), 28°C, 78% humidity. 15 K tomorrow.

Yes. That’s all marketing to sell more water. All of it. There is a book called waterlogged that covered this topic in detail. From what I could gather the guy basically concluded, you should drink water… get this (drum roll)…. When you get thirsty (only). 

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5 hours ago, rexpotter said:

Some people might think that IV rehydration fluids are just water, however an IV rehydration mixture is specifically formulated for quick absorption and maximum hydration. It's typically a saline solution which may also contain nutrients such as glucose, dextrose and electrolytes.

 

I’ve actually looked into this hydration topic a lot because I end up spending time out at sea and I want to be as efficient as possible. Anyway…. I’ve concluded that drinking water isn’t even that good. Sure drink a little that is not going to hurt. But what you do is bring a fruit. I find here in Thailand a som o is the absolute perfect way to drink or as people say, “hydrate”. Drinking gobs of water is how fools “hydrate”. But hey to each their own that’s the system I found worked both on paper and in practice. 

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7 hours ago, rexpotter said:

A strange bit true fact. Didn't make sense, but too much waster washes out the good bacteria.

Bacteria has norhing to do with it. 

 

The problem is electrolytes (sodium, potassium). Especially if sweating a lot. 

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Sheryl said:

Bacteria has norhing to do with it. 

 

The problem is electrolytes (sodium, potassium). Especially if sweating a lot. 

 

 

That's not true. Please don't tell people that.

 

Are you the health advisor extraordinaire on this forum? Microbiom is that the word you prefer? if you drink tot much water it removes the healthy organisms from your digestive system.

 

Not all bacteria is bad. Bacteria are everywhere, including your entire body. The bacteria in our body weighs as much as our brain–3 lbs! Bacteria can be harmful, but some species of bacteria are needed to keep us healthy. The bacteria on our skin, in our airways, and in our digestive system are the first line of defense against foreign “invaders” (pathogens) that can cause infection and other problems.

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4 minutes ago, rexpotter said:

That's not true. Please don't tell people that.

 

Are you the health advisor extraordinaire on this forum? Microbiom is that the word you prefer? if you drink tot much water it removes the healthy organisms from your digestive system.

 

Not all bacteria is bad. Bacteria are everywhere, including your entire body. The bacteria in our body weighs as much as our brain–3 lbs! Bacteria can be harmful, but some species of bacteria are needed to keep us healthy. The bacteria on our skin, in our airways, and in our digestive system are the first line of defense against foreign “invaders” (pathogens) that can cause infection and other problems.

Especially after heat exhaustion which include often diahrea when all the good stuff has been flushed out. You can die from drinking too much water in that case. I already stated clearly that an IV contains many things of which you mentioned a few to treat it.  Global Moderator know it all.

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