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Thailand Visa Exemption (60 days) and Visa On Arrival (VOA) (15 days)


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I am arriving on 2nd June 2024 after other country medical proceedure. 

Previously I have been on Retirement Extension thru the Kalasin Imm. office, with the B800000 in the bank, but my retirement extension ran out while I was away.

 Previous advice on this forum was to come in on a Visa On Arrival, then convert to back to Retirement Visa.

Is this advice still valid?

Do I need photos for the Visa On Arrival and can I get them where I fill in the Visa On Arrival?

Thank you.

 

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23 minutes ago, carlyai said:

I am arriving on 2nd June 2024 after other country medical proceedure. 

Previously I have been on Retirement Extension thru the Kalasin Imm. office, with the B800000 in the bank, but my retirement extension ran out while I was away.

 Previous advice on this forum was to come in on a Visa On Arrival, then convert to back to Retirement Visa.

Is this advice still valid?

Do I need photos for the Visa On Arrival and can I get them where I fill in the Visa On Arrival?

Thank you.

 

 

Are you really sure you want a visa on arrival rather then a visa exempt entry?  What passport are you holding?

 

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3 hours ago, kwilco said:

What is a "short term business engagement"?

Clearly less than 60 days. Look at its intention to get your answer. Thai immigration don't want sustained working. Doing business would encompass meetings, training, on-boarding and things of that nature.

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3 hours ago, george said:

Valid from 2024-06-01:

 

Visa Exemption (TR-60)

 

Isn't "TR" the abbreviation used for the 60 day Tourist Visa as that's what my visa says (also how it was advertised on embassy sites)

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38 minutes ago, Upnotover said:

 

Are you really sure you want a visa on arrival rather then a visa exempt entry?  What passport are you holding?

 

Australian

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3 minutes ago, carlyai said:

Australian

So you can enter visa exempt, 60 days.  During that time convert to a single non-O, 90 days, at immigration and in the last 30 days of that go back for a 12 month extension of stay.

 

Alternatively, you can apply for a single non-O e-visa (retirement) whilst you are in Australia, that cuts out the conversion step.

 

Either way you'll need 800k in the bank when you get the non-O.

 

 

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I feel sure that other members here would have watched THT yesterday. He also mentioned that later this year the list of Visa types were going to be shortened but there were no precise details. Wonder what that will mean?

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32 minutes ago, Pattaya57 said:

Isn't "TR" the abbreviation used for the 60 day Tourist Visa as that's what my visa says (also how it was advertised on embassy sites)

 

Correct, that's confusing terminology here.

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26 minutes ago, Upnotover said:

So you can enter visa exempt, 60 days.  During that time convert to a single non-O, 90 days, at immigration and in the last 30 days of that go back for a 12 month extension of stay.

 

Alternatively, you can apply for a single non-O e-visa (retirement) whilst you are in Australia, that cuts out the conversion step.

 

Either way you'll need 800k in the bank when you get the non-O.

 

 

Thanks Upnotover . 

If I need photos, can I get them where I apply for the visa exempt at the airport?

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58 minutes ago, Pattaya57 said:

Isn't "TR" the abbreviation used for the 60 day Tourist Visa as that's what my visa says (also how it was advertised on embassy sites)

 

"TR30" was the "old" visa exemption. "TR60" was/is the 60 days tourist visa and (apparently) this new 60-days visa exemption. We will soon get clarity here.

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4 hours ago, george said:

Valid from 2024-06-01:

 

Visa Exemption (TR-60)

 

Nationals of the following 93 countries and territories are entitled to visa exemption for the purpose of tourism and short-term business engagements, for a period not exceeding 60 days.

 

Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bahrain, Bhutan, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, Czech Republic, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Hong Kong, Hungary. Iceland, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy. Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Korea (ROK), Kosovo, Kuwait, Laos, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sri Lanka, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, UAE, UK, USA, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam.

 

Visa on arrival (VOA) (TR-15)

 

Nationals of the following 31 countries and territories may apply for visa on arrival at the immigration checkpoints on arrival for the purpose of tourism, for a period not exceeding 15 days.

 

Armenia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Bhutan, Bolivia, China, Costa Rica, Cyprus, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Fiji, Georgia, India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Malta, Mexico, Namibia, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Seychelles, Taiwan, Tunisia, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu and Venezuela

 

 

Requirements for Visa-on-Arrival

- Application form, fully completed 
- One recent photo
- Proof of means of living expenses at the amount of 10,000 Baht per person and 20,000 Baht per family accordingly.
- Passport with at least 1 month validity and at least 2 blank pages
- Fully paid onward travel tickets which are usable within 30 days of the date of entry.
- Fee of 2,000 Baht (cash only in Thai Baht/non refundable)


Visitors who enter the Kingdom with Visa on Arrival generally cannot file an application for extension of stay, except in special cases of illness which prevents them from travelling. In this case, the application can be submitted at the Office of Immigration Bureau.

 

 

Source: Department of Consular Affairs Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Thailand 29 May 2024-05-29

 

Screenshot 2024-05-30 at 04.24.38.png

 

Go here for: DTA 5-year visa (Destination Thailand)

Go here for all changes:

Big Thailand Visa Changes from 2024-06-01

 

VOA info is outdated, Taiwan and India have 30 days visa exemption , valid till 11 Nov 2024,

 

Thailand extends visa exemption for Indian and Taiwanese tourists for another six months

The 30-day visa-free stay will be extended from 11 May until 11 November 2024.

 

https://www.tatnews.org/2024/05/thailand-extends-visa-exemption-for-indian-and-taiwanese-tourists-for-another-six-months/

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16 minutes ago, carlyai said:

Thanks Upnotover . 

If I need photos, can I get them where I apply for the visa exempt at the airport?

No photo's required.  You don't "apply" for it, just go to the immigration desk and they will stamp you in.

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2 hours ago, carlyai said:

I am arriving on 2nd June 2024 after other country medical proceedure. 

Previously I have been on Retirement Extension thru the Kalasin Imm. office, with the B800000 in the bank, but my retirement extension ran out while I was away.

 Previous advice on this forum was to come in on a Visa On Arrival, then convert to back to Retirement Visa.

Is this advice still valid?

Do I need photos for the Visa On Arrival and can I get them where I fill in the Visa On Arrival?

Thank you.

 

arrive on Visa EXEMPT
u never arrived on a visa on arrival if ur holding a western passport.

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Thank you for information! There seems to be no point in 15-day visas on arrival for those who are used to vacationing in Thailand for 2-3 months. Only makes sense for short travel packages.

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31 minutes ago, Farangus said:

Thank you for information! There seems to be no point in 15-day visas on arrival for those who are used to vacationing in Thailand for 2-3 months. Only makes sense for short travel packages.

Visa on arrival is only applicable to the limited list of nationalities in the table above. These countries are not approved to receive a visa exempt entry. 

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, lamyai3 said:

Visa on arrival is only applicable to the limited list of nationalities in the table above. These countries are not approved to receive a visa exempt entry. 

Except the lists above have several countries in both lists, which makes no sense (Bulgaria, China, Cyprus, Fiji, India, Kazakhstan, etc.)

 

Edited by Pattaya57
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11 minutes ago, Pattaya57 said:

Except the lists above have several countries in both lists, which makes no sense (Bulgaria, China, Cyprus, Fiji, India, Kazakhstan, etc.)

 

These seem to be temporary stimulus measures - for instance, prior to the latest announcement India and Taiwan were put on the visa exempt entry list for six months expiring 24th May. 

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well just got back from IMM in CM...they had NO idea about any 60 days as i got my usual 30 days....day late and a dollar short for me......will see if I get the 60 next month on  my 1st border hop in chiang khong......

 

the communication between these groups is baffling...but at least i didnt go all the way into VN laos to get a 60 day VISA...

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So, The new 60 days on arrival is it a temporary arrangement? As it usually is with Thailand. They never like to fully commit.  And is it just cuz they want to get tourists in during low season and then once high season is upon us will it go back to 30 days?

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, LS24 said:

Clearly less than 60 days. Look at its intention to get your answer. Thai immigration don't want sustained working. Doing business would encompass meetings, training, on-boarding and things of that nature.

previously immigration did.t want any working - including voluntary. So what work is permitted? I used to get a B visa to visit THailand on business - e.g buying or meetings - tourist visa didn't cover that.

 

This needs clairification as work has neer been permitted before.

Digital nomads still neeed to get a special (expensive) visa.  So it will be interesting to see wht they are talking about.

Edited by kwilco
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1 hour ago, paulikens said:

So, The new 60 days on arrival is it a temporary arrangement? As it usually is with Thailand. They never like to fully commit.  And is it just cuz they want to get tourists in during low season and then once high season is upon us will it go back to 30 days?

 

I DID read in one of the papers - that it was "temporary" - but they didn't say for how long. THink it might have been Khao Sod.

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15 hours ago, kwilco said:

What is a "short term business engagement"?

 

It's where you're here on business, but not employed here - still being paid in the country where you're employed.

Most commonly it's training (either as the trainer or going to get training), or, back in the day at least, to do software upgrades. Still true where the system is, for security reasons, not accessible via the internet.

For companies with operations in multiple countries, it will include things like visits to teams working for them by the big boss from abroad.

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1 minute ago, bkk_mike said:

 

It's where you're here on business, but not employed here - still being paid in the country where you're employed.

Most commonly it's training (either as the trainer or going to get training), or, back in the day at least, to do software upgrades. Still true where the system is, for security reasons, not accessible via the internet.

For companies with operations in multiple countries, it will include things like visits to teams working for them by the big boss from abroad.

Where do you get thet from?

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