Jump to content

Pension Income Flow Into Thailand


Recommended Posts

During my last visit to immigration in Bangkok (May 2008) I had a chat (in Thai) with the officer who signed off on my one-year extension application (retirement). I told her that I was thinking of switching from the 800K baht deposit method to the 65K/month pension. I asked her if it was OK to leave the pension funds in my New York bank account. She then asked me how I would pay for local expenses in Thailand. I said I would use international ATM withdrawals as needed. She said it would be better to show your bank account passbook with a regular "flow" of inter-bank transfers from New York to Thailand.

Since I didn't need to do the next extension until May 2009, I didn't pursue the matter. But I've wondered about her statement that there should be a regular "flow" of funds (if using the pension method). It makes me uneasy that the decision to re-new the extension could be a (variable) judgment call by an Immo officer on what constitutes an adequate flow of foreign exchange transfers. For example, in the extreme case, I could be living with a friend, with all expenses covered, and have no need for funds from my US account. Would I then be denied an extension even though I had the embassy letter attesting to the pension of 65K baht/month? What about transfers of only 20,000 baht a month; OK?

Has anyone had any recent experience with this (at any immigration office)? That is, do the immigration officers look at how much you are transferring into Thailand when you are using the pension method to renew the visa (retirement extension)?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is no requirement to actually transfer your income into your bank from abroad.

However some Immigration offices like to see a bit of movement in your account. As to how much movement? Every office will have a different idea. You are going to have to ask them. Sorry not much help. Hopefully someone in the same boat as you will chip in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you can't document funds coming into Thailand for living expenses then immigration can rightly surmise that you may be working in Thailand illegally. Can you prove that you are not working here? In the extreme, immigration is more than capable of denying the extension of stay. Best to have a money trail into and out of your bank account.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

During my last visit to immigration in Bangkok (May 2008) I had a chat (in Thai) with the officer who signed off on my one-year extension application (retirement). I told her that I was thinking of switching from the 800K baht deposit method to the 65K/month pension. I asked her if it was OK to leave the pension funds in my New York bank account. She then asked me how I would pay for local expenses in Thailand. I said I would use international ATM withdrawals as needed. She said it would be better to show your bank account passbook with a regular "flow" of inter-bank transfers from New York to Thailand.

Since I didn't need to do the next extension until May 2009, I didn't pursue the matter. But I've wondered about her statement that there should be a regular "flow" of funds (if using the pension method). It makes me uneasy that the decision to re-new the extension could be a (variable) judgment call by an Immo officer on what constitutes an adequate flow of foreign exchange transfers. For example, in the extreme case, I could be living with a friend, with all expenses covered, and have no need for funds from my US account. Would I then be denied an extension even though I had the embassy letter attesting to the pension of 65K baht/month? What about transfers of only 20,000 baht a month; OK?

Has anyone had any recent experience with this (at any immigration office)? That is, do the immigration officers look at how much you are transferring into Thailand when you are using the pension method to renew the visa (retirement extension)?

I keep 800k in my Thai bank account and ATM day-to-day funds from my stateside account. Last year I renewed with only a few transactions showing in my Thai account. I brought my ATM slips and bank statements in case the immigration officer made an issue. No questions from him, so I didn't show my ATM slips. This was in Nongkai....could be different elsewhere.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing is guaranteed, but if I were you I wouldn't worry about this. I estimate the chance of being rejected based on lack of flow to be quite low. However, I would keep all bank records about your ATM withdrawals. The ATM slips fade very quickly so that is an interesting thing if they want to see originals. I would print online statements from the non-Thai bank as well.

Another thing to consider, you may save money on doing big SWIFT transfers vs. fees paid for each 10K baht you get from an ATM,.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is no requirement to actually transfer your income into your bank from abroad.

However some Immigration offices like to see a bit of movement in your account. As to how much movement? Every office will have a different idea.

That is my understanding too.

They want to know you can support yourself without having to work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Willi2006, please define “income”as used in the context of your post. I don't see how incoming remittances credited to your savings account can be proof of income. It can be proof of incoming money, ie money coming from abroad, which is not required by the extension rules, but not proof of income, ie of earnings, which is required by the extension rules. But in the end it is a question of whether a particular immigration officer applies the rules correctly.

--

Maestro

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Surely, if you are changing from 800k in the bank, to 65k monthly income, the rules clearly say immigration will want to see a letter from US Embassy confirming your monthly income. It then becomes irrelevant where you keep your money, how often it comes in, or by what method it comes in?

That is how I read the rules, as I, too will be switching to the monthly income letter from the British Embassy for my extension in May.

Like you, I wish to keep most of my pension income out of Thailand, except for occasional ATM or TT amounts to live off.

The key to the extension will be the proof of income letter from the relevant embassy, I believe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dah fahrang, you read the rules correctly. It is about proof of a specified minimum income, not about proof of remittance of that income to Thailand. There have been a few posts by members who were asked by an immigration officer to show also proof of remittance to Thailand but these requests were rare, were for the marriage extension, and were clearly an abuse of authority by the officer.

--

Maestro

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dah fahrang, you read the rules correctly. It is about proof of a specified minimum income, not about proof of remittance of that income to Thailand. There have been a few posts by members who were asked by an immigration officer to show also proof of remittance to Thailand but these requests were rare, were for the marriage extension, and were clearly an abuse of authority by the officer.

--

Maestro

They are not rare in Jomtien - they want embassy letter, bank letter, and pages from bank book showing last two FTT's into your Thai bank. They always 'yellow highlight' these transactions. I dont know what ammount they are looking for but I expect 65000 or more per month. All the officers I have dealt with require this - abuse of authority or not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dah fahrang, you read the rules correctly. It is about proof of a specified minimum income, not about proof of remittance of that income to Thailand. There have been a few posts by members who were asked by an immigration officer to show also proof of remittance to Thailand but these requests were rare, were for the marriage extension, and were clearly an abuse of authority by the officer.

--

Maestro

They are not rare in Jomtien - they want embassy letter, bank letter, and pages from bank book showing last two FTT's into your Thai bank. They always 'yellow highlight' these transactions. I dont know what ammount they are looking for but I expect 65000 or more per month. All the officers I have dealt with require this - abuse of authority or not.

A misleading post, perpetuating the misinformation about required transfers. There is no requirement to transfer into Thailand a specific amount money on an annual basis into Thailand. If you want to live on 200K per year and you meet the requirements (800K or pension or combo) you qualify.

Edited by Jingthing
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A misleading post, perpetuating the misinformation about required transfers. There is no requirement to transfer into Thailand a specific amount money on an annual basis into Thailand. If you want to live on 200K per year and you meet the requirements (800K or pension or combo) you qualify.

How is this misleading - I am saying what they ask for.

I know there is no requirement for transfer records -but that is what they ask for.

There is no requirement to show your bank book -the embassy letter is all that is required - but in Jomtien they require it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

. I dont know what ammount they are looking for but I expect 65000 or more per month.

I use Jomtien. Yes, they require bank book copies. That is true. What is false is your supposition that they require that 65K baht per month be TRANSFERRED in for annual extensions. Again, I will repeat, because that kind of statement feeds this false rumor that people get confused about all the time:

There is no requirement to transfer into Thailand a specific amount money on an annual basis into Thailand.

Transfer in as much as you need to make the money requirements. It can be 200K baht per year, it can be 5 million baht per year, whatever you need. If however, you don't transfer in ANYTHING, they will likely ask you to explain what is your income stream to live on in Thailand.

Edited by Jingthing
Link to comment
Share on other sites

. I dont know what ammount they are looking for but I expect 65000 or more per month.

I use Jomtien. Yes, they require bank book copies. That is true. What is false is your supposition that they require that 65K baht per month be TRANSFERRED in for annual extensions. Again, I will repeat, because that kind of statement feeds this false rumor that people get confused about all the time:

There is no requirement to transfer into Thailand a specific amount money on an annual basis into Thailand.

Transfer in as much as you need to make the money requirements. It can be 200K baht per year, it can be 5 million baht per year, whatever you need. If however, you don't transfer in ANYTHING, they will likely ask you to explain what is your income stream to live on in Thailand.

<deleted>, They get confused because every immigration office has there own rules. You admit there is no requirement for copies of bank book yet in the next sentence you admit that Jomtien office does. If there is no requirement to transfer into Thailand you obviously dont have to transfer anything.So what is the specified ammount to be transfeered to Thailand? 10 baht.?

If every immigration office used the same official rules there would be no need for these forums. The same questions arise everytime because each office has its own rules. Do you always get out of bed the wrong side - I find your posts irritating- smug apart from Thai Baht bus mafia and grape nuts from Villa Market.!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK Cool down.

For the OP. It is best to have a bank book ready to show when you apply,

with some evidence of transfer(s) during the year.

It does not need to be the full amount.

Some offices may ask to see, others do not.

Obviously Jomtien does.

Any others??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

<deleted>, They get confused because every immigration office has there own rules. You admit there is no requirement for copies of bank book yet in the next sentence you admit that Jomtien office does. If there is no requirement to transfer into Thailand you obviously dont have to transfer anything.So what is the specified ammount to be transfeered to Thailand? 10 baht.?

If every immigration office used the same official rules there would be no need for these forums. The same questions arise everytime because each office has its own rules. Do you always get out of bed the wrong side - I find your posts irritating- smug apart from Thai Baht bus mafia and grape nuts from Villa Market.!

Sorry, but your post just fed the tired old rumor that you must transfer a specific amount of income. Showing a bank book copy is trivial! Being required to transfer in 65K per month is not trivial. The issues are completely different, and I could give a grape nut that you find my posts irritating. I find posts that feed false rumors irritating and will opine on them as I please.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks to Astral and JingThing for suggesting having at least some evidence of transfers during the year (if renewing based on pension income).

But here's a related question: has anyone who uses the 800,000 baht method (for extension based on retirement) had the experience of Immo officers asking to see evidence of transfers into the country? What if the 800,000 is in a fixed deposit account with no activity other than quarterly interest accruals? Will they still want to see foreign exchange transfers during the year? If the answer is "no" for the 800K baht method, then why should it be different for the 65Kbaht/month arrangement?

Comments and recent experience most welcome.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks to Astral and JingThing for suggesting having at least some evidence of transfers during the year (if renewing based on pension income).

But here's a related question: has anyone who uses the 800,000 baht method (for extension based on retirement) had the experience of Immo officers asking to see evidence of transfers into the country? What if the 800,000 is in a fixed deposit account with no activity other than quarterly interest accruals? Will they still want to see foreign exchange transfers during the year? If the answer is "no" for the 800K baht method, then why should it be different for the 65Kbaht/month arrangement?

Comments and recent experience most welcome.

I have seen reports where the funds were in a fixed deposit account that an immigration office/officer had asked for a bank book for antoher account that showed transfers and withdrawls.

The immigration offices that want to see a bank book (Chiang Mai/Pattaya mostly) just want to see some activity of transfers and withdrawls. The entire reason for doing this is to confirm that the applicant is not working or has income of some type being generated here. Not to confirm that the income letter is factual.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.




×
×
  • Create New...