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Shinawatra saga: Yingluck’s comeback fuels legal limelight


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Former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra’s potential return from exile sparks intrigue over her legal fate, mirroring her brother Thaksin’s tumultuous history, claims the Shinawatras’ lawyer.

 

Pichit Chuenban, a figure linked to Prime Minister Srettha Thavisin’s Cabinet due to his close allegiance to the Shinawatras, responded to speculation about Yingluck’s comeback.

 

“I really don’t know. I’m only taking care of her case.”


Yingluck’s brother, ex-PM Thaksin, hinted at her possible return during a recent Songkran visit to Chiang Mai, expressing a desire to reunite for festivities. Pichit affirmed that Yingluck must adhere to legal protocols upon return, akin to her brother’s journey. However, he vehemently denied any preferential treatment towards Thaksin, stressing his compliance with due legal process.


The possibility of a clandestine arrangement for Thaksin’s return last August, following a pardon reducing his sentence, ignited speculation. Recently granted parole on health grounds, Thaksin’s situation remains a topic of scrutiny.

 

Pichit refuted claims of personal conversations with Yingluck regarding her return, having only notified her of acquittal earlier this year. Yingluck, ousted by a military coup like her brother, fled before sentencing linked to a rice-pledging scheme.

 

Despite past legal entanglements, Yingluck saw two recent Supreme Court acquittals: one in December for malfeasance related to a security council chief’s transfer, and another in March for alleged collusion in a PR campaign contract.

 

Pichit’s controversial past, including a brief jail stint for contempt of court, adds another layer to the saga. Initially considered for a government role, he faced public backlash and withdrawal from consideration, reported The Nation.

Amidst rumours of ministerial posts in Srettha’s reshuffle, Pichit maintains ignorance.

 

“I know nothing. I’m focused on my work.”


ORIGINAL STORY: Former Thai PM Yingluck cleared in major corruption case

 

The Supreme Court’s Criminal Case Division for Holders of Political Positions yesterday delivered a resounding verdict, absolving Yingluck Shinawatra and five co-defendants of malfeasance and corruption allegations.

 

The charges stemmed from the allocation of a hefty 240-million-baht campaign budget aimed at promoting the Yingluck government’s ambitious 2-trillion-baht infrastructure projects.

 

Commenting on the verdict, Thanaporn Sriyakul, director of the Political and Public Policy Analysis Institute, pointed out potential legal avenues that could pave the way for Yingluck’s return. He highlighted recent regulations concerning parole and inmate detention outside prison, suggesting that these factors might influence Yingluck’s decision.

 

Thanaporn alluded to the infamous rice-pledging case that shadows Yingluck’s legacy.

 

“It’s plausible that Yingluck will follow a similar path as Thaksin but her return hinges on various factors, including her willingness to face punishment and the possibility of a royal pardon.”

 

The court’s unanimous decision, voting 9-0 in favour of acquittal, dealt a blow to the National Anti-Corruption Commission’s accusations against Yingluck and her co-defendants. Notably, the court also rescinded the arrest warrant previously issued for Yingluck in connection with this case.

 

The crux of the legal dispute revolved around allegations of impropriety in awarding contracts for the Roadshow to Thailand’s Future Thailand 2020 campaign. The prosecution argued that Yingluck and her associates bypassed public tenders, favouring select companies for the project. However, the court found no evidence of bias or wrongdoing, asserting that the budget allocation adhered to procurement regulations, reported Bangkok Post.

 

Moreover, the court underscored the approval of Yingluck’s government projects by relevant authorities at the time, dismissing claims of misappropriation or wasteful expenditure. This latest acquittal adds to Yingluck’s legal victories, including her exoneration in a 2011 controversy over a National Security Council appointment.

 

Nevertheless, the spectre of the rice-pledging scandal still looms large over Yingluck’s legacy. Fleeing in 2017 following a conviction in the rice-pledging programme, Yingluck remains a fugitive with an active arrest warrant.

 

by Mitch Connor

Top Photo courtesy of The Nation

 

Source: The Thaiger 2024-04-19

 

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11 minutes ago, JoePai said:

                                                                       :cheesy:

Does it really matter who's there? Seems like they are all very similar ad from the same club.

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57 minutes ago, webfact said:

Yingluck Shinawatra’s potential return from exile sparks intrigue

I'm just curious if she will wear a neck brace already when arriving...

I can picture her in the plane after the landing announcement: "Attendant, help me put this on will ya"

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Her remaining sentence, G2G/Rice Scheme, will be reduced (Royal decree) from five years to one year. One year gets reduced by 50%.

 

She'll serve six months, but under home supervision (no ankle monitor).

 

 

This all begs the question: Why were these two run out of the country in the first place?

 

I think she'll be back before the end of the year, but based on the increased focus on this matter it may be a lot sooner. Maybe after the Royal Birthday (sixth cycle; a big deal so no distractions between now and then) on 28 July?

 

 

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Come back, do a few weeks in a hospital suite, exit "on parole without a monitor" but keep you neckbrace on for a couple of weeks, and Bob's your uncle - Freedom for the uber-wealthy.

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27 minutes ago, klauskunkel said:

I'm just curious if she will wear a neck brace already when arriving...

I can picture her in the plane after the landing announcement: "Attendant, help me put this on will ya"

Standard garb will be issued just before the plane lands, wheelchair,neck brace,arm sling and a few other props. Quick trip to the police hospital VIP ward for some unforseen jet lag...rinse and repeat. What a place we call home...

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4 hours ago, webfact said:

Former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra’s potential return from exile sparks intrigue over her legal fate, mirroring her brother Thaksin’s tumultuous history, claims the Shinawatras’ lawyer.

Thaksin will have sorted out the finer details before she catches the plane home.

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4 hours ago, webfact said:

Yingluck’s brother, ex-PM Thaksin, hinted at her possible return during a recent Songkran visit to Chiang Mai, expressing a desire to reunite for festivities. Pichit affirmed that Yingluck must adhere to legal protocols upon return, akin to her brother’s journey. However, he vehemently denied any preferential treatment towards Thaksin, stressing his compliance with due legal process.

Laughable.

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4 hours ago, OneMoreFarang said:

When will the majority, or at least a good part, of Thai people wake up and protest against double standards?

Why would any official be honest if they can be corrupt and get rich and don't get punished?

Letting Thaksin and Yingluck getting away with their crimes is exactly the wrong signal.

Obviously, there are others. But the Shinawatra cases are so obvious in your face - we can do whatever we want.

Sad.

Protesting by the general populace is now only done via social media.

Unless part of a politically backed "Rent-a-Crowd" it is safer to stay off the streets.🙃🙃

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43 minutes ago, Golden Triangle said:

I really don't understand why you lot get so wound up by all this, it's got sfa to do with us, I ignore it all, nothing I or you say or do will have any effect whatsoever, so why bother?

They're obsessed old farang who need a hate figure (I'm surprised they haven't latched on to Big Joke).

The regular Haters of Shin are straight out of the cast of 1984, Ministry of Love .

 

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