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Had a setback - how can I prevent a disaster?


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Last night I was a bit over enthusiastic in getting this bottle opened and the cork split halfway down the neck of the bottle. 

 

Is there a way to extract the cork without it disintegrating and falling into the bottle? Cheers!

 

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Just now, impulse said:

I'd go with a sheetrock screw, a screwdriver for the screw and a pair of pliers to pull it out.  Mostly because that works, and I have those 3 items to hand.  To get fancy, I'd use an electric screwdriver.

 

Sheetrock screws start better than wood screws in cork.


Oops.  Transam beat me by seconds.  Damn, I wish I'd paid attention in 5th grade typing.

 

 

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47 minutes ago, lopburi3 said:

No harm pushing into bottle.  Or using what we expats so often used 55 years ago when faced with such an issue opening local Mosel in Germany.

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My concern is that the cork is already starting to break up - I guess if the worst came to the worst I could sieve it though a coffee filter afterwards...

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54 minutes ago, transam said:

Screw a screw through the cork, then pull on the screw head with a pair of pliers...🤗

 

I like that idea. I will try it in the morning - I have already poured a monkey shoulder tonight.

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Take a (new - you don't want your wine to taste of Kiwi!) shoe laces, tie a big knot in one end.

 

With a skewer or screwdriver gently push the cork down past the neck of the bottle until it is floating in the wine.

 

Ease the knotted end of the shoelace down past the cork.

 

Firmly but gently withdraw the shoelace, it will bring the broken cork up through the neck of the bottle.

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Twisted the cork when pulling it out on a bottle thats been sitting around for a while ??? I've had this happen before.

 

A Cork Screw is the best option, but as mentioned there is a risk of the cork breaking up and falling into the Whisky so it'll need some care.

 

That said, cork in the Whisky is not a big deal and can easily be removed from a glass of Whisky with a tea-spoon (or poured through a filter).

 

The issue is 're-corking the bottle'... So you'll need to get a cork from elsewhere (or drink the rest of the bottle in one sitting) - Cling film will also work to seal off the remaining whisky.

 

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40 minutes ago, herfiehandbag said:

Take a (new - you don't want your wine to taste of Kiwi!) shoe laces, tie a big knot in one end.

 

With a skewer or screwdriver gently push the cork down past the neck of the bottle until it is floating in the wine.

 

Ease the knotted end of the shoelace down past the cork.

 

Firmly but gently withdraw the shoelace, it will bring the broken cork up through the neck of the bottle.

Works with Jockanese falling down water too!

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Anybody else remember or use the Wiggle and Twist? Great for removing broken corks and I still have one at home. Called something else in the picture below -

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The open spiral corkscrews are generally safer to use then those with a solid spiral especially with older/dryer corks.

Happy drinking :burp:

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15 hours ago, RuamRudy said:

 

My concern is that the cork is already starting to break up - I guess if the worst came to the worst I could sieve it though a coffee filter afterwards...

NB. Make sure to use natural or unbleached coffee filter papers, not the standard white ones, otherwise you'll affect the taste. 

 

 

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32 minutes ago, RuamRudy said:

Good news - disaster has been averted thanks to the application of a bit of @transam and @impulse's suggestion and the insertion of a BBQ skewer. Thanks to all for you input. Sláinte

 

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Wow, what a relief. Thank goodness disaster was averted. We can all rest easy now. 

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59 minutes ago, RuamRudy said:

Good news - disaster has been averted thanks to the application of a bit of @transam and @impulse's suggestion and the insertion of a BBQ skewer. Thanks to all for you input. Sláinte

 

Good follow up - no one wants to see a decent Whisky go to waste....  

 

You finished the bottle ?  or if not, how did you re-seal it ?

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3 minutes ago, richard_smith237 said:

 

Good follow up - no one wants to see a decent Whisky go to waste....  

 

You finished the bottle ?  or if not, how did you re-seal it ?

Always save old wine bottle corks, they do come in handy........😉

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