Jump to content

Virus expert reveals why Thailand chose AstraZeneca’s viral vector vaccine


webfact

Recommended Posts

Virus expert reveals why Thailand chose AstraZeneca’s viral vector vaccine

By The Nation

 

800_c4a62c0e4585f75.jpg?v=1611155117

Photo Credit: Bureau of Information office of Public Health ministry's Permanent Secretary

 

Dr Yong Poovorawan, chief of the Centre of Excellence in Clinical Virology at Chulalongkorn University, appeared at a Public Health Ministry briefing on Wednesday in a bid to reassure the public after widespread concern over Thailand’s Covid-19 vaccine procurement.

 

“It is impossible for [every country] to get vaccines immediately even when they have enough money,” Dr Yong explained. “The global population is more than 7 billion. Just 50 per cent of population would need 8 billion vaccines since each person has to take two doses. So it will be impossible to vaccinate everybody within this year.”

 

How long before vaccine is approved – and will it be safe?

 

Vaccines usually take a long time to develop in animal and clinical (human) trials, which first need approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), said Yong. Clinical trials have three steps: safety study, immunity test and effectiveness study.

 

The final step usually takes more than a year or two for researchers to collect data from parallel trials where one group of volunteers is given the vaccine and a parallel “control” group is given a placebo.

 

However, that process has been accelerated as scientists around the world hurried to find a cure for the global pandemic. As a result, Covid-19 vaccines have been developed in just one year. They are now being screened for safety and efficacy by health authorities globally, including Thailand’s FDA.

 

Sinovac or AstraZeneca: Which is better?

 

We need to see which vaccines Western countries are using, said Dr Yong. The first available were mRNA vaccines – a new type of vaccine to protect against infectious diseases. These vaccines use strands of genetic material called mRNA inside a special coating called a nanoparticle.

 

When injected, they instruct the human body to create a “spike protein” similar to the SARS-CoV-2 virus responsible for Covid-19. This immune response produces antibodies to protect our cells from getting infected if the virus enters our body.

 

We could say it uses our body to create a vaccine, said Yong. The mRNA method is new for humans but draws on previous research on other diseases.

 

Another type is the viral vector vaccines produced by AstraZeneca and Russia’s Sputnik programme. These are similar to mRNA vaccines but use adenovirus as a vector instead of nanoparticles. This vaccine technology has a proven track record fighting the spread of Ebola in Africa. Moreover, viral vector vaccines will be cheaper in the future.

 

China’s Sinovac uses a third approach – the inactivated or killed vaccine method that has been in use for 70 years to combat viruses such as polio and rabies. The disadvantage of this vaccine is difficulty in manufacturing, increased cost per dose, and multiple immunisations required.

 

Thailand has agreed to buy two million doses of SinoVac’s inactivated vaccine. As we know almost everything about traditional inactivated vaccines, it would be easier to handle, said Yong. But its relatively high cost of manufacturing makes it difficult to produce and purchase in high quantities.

 

Side effects of vaccine in Norway

 

Dr Yong also responded to news that 23 frail elderly patients had died soon after taking Pfizer BioNTec’s mRNA vaccine. The deaths might have been caused by side effects such as dizziness that triggered accidents, he said.

 

Norwegian health authorities say common adverse reactions to mRNA vaccines that are not usually dangerous – such as fever, nausea and diarrhoea – may have played a role in the deaths. Dr Yong pointed out that death rates in general among the elderly had not risen after vaccination.

 

Will pregnant women and children get the jab?

 

Dr Yong said more research was needed on safety and dosage before pregnant women and children under 18 were given the vaccine in Thailand.

 

Addressing public calls to vaccinate people of working age first, he said there was no guarantee this move would prevent transmission. He explained that the vaccine may just prevent symptoms, meaning that even if they were inoculated, the working-age group could spread the virus to at-risk members of society.

 

People should understand that every disease can be prevented, Dr Yong said in conclusion. Vaccines were just one tool to help stop the virus from spreading.

 

Meanwhile people should calmly continue using the tools in hand – keep their hands clean, wearing masks, and social distancing – to protect themselves. The results of vaccination would be seen soon, he predicted, since many wealthy countries had already rolled out inoculation programmes.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30401549

 

 

nation.jpg

-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2021-01-21
 
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Replies 133
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Another reason why Oxford vaccine (perhaps others) was so quick and also effective is it has basically been in development for years (possible decade(s)) for such a scenario. It's not a last minute, rush to get it out thing. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just now, AlexRich said:

The Astra/Oxford vaccine is easier to store and distribute, so makes sense to roll it out quickly. 

Beat me to it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

well written OP and good to hear a professional taking the time and talking sense instead of some uneducated unelected wooden top blurting out nonsense, thumbs up from me 

 

Seems like our esteemed Anutin will be injecting a vaccine into his body that was developed by a team of - the dirty unwashed ................ 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not a virologist, I don't lead a centre for excellence, and I do not do briefings for the government.

However, I knew all this before, since I know how to google.

But I admit: this Young dude was faster than me in calling a press conference.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting stuff, for sure. 

 

But I'm only seeing an order for 2 million doses- enough to do less than 2% of the Thai population.

 

The title says Thailand chose AZ.  Is there any actually on order? 

 

Or are they waiting for the brown envelopes?  (Oh, c'mon- you were thinking it, too)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, impulse said:

Interesting stuff, for sure. 

 

But I'm only seeing an order for 2 million doses- enough to do less than 2% of the Thai population.

 

The title says Thailand chose AZ.  Is there any actually on order? 

 

Or are they waiting for the brown envelopes?  (Oh, c'mon- you were thinking it, too)

 

 

They are making about 100million doses in Thailand but only 20million are going to be reserved for domestic use.  They will probably try get more from somewhere else. 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dr Yong explained. “The global population is more than 7 billion. Just 50 per cent of population would need 8 billion vaccines since each person has to take two doses. So it will be impossible to vaccinate everybody within this year.”

 

Maybe maths aint his strong point. 7 Billion vacines not 8 Billion...

Link to post
Share on other sites

they mention general differences between the Pfizer moderna AZ and Sino but I wish they would detail the differences more in laymans terms...i.e anedovirus and nanoparticles...and how they differ

Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, webfact said:

“It is impossible for [every country] to get vaccines immediately even when they have enough money,” Dr Yong explained.

 

Well, have a look to this nice article of yesterday:

 

https://www.wionews.com/india-news/goodwill-gesture-india-begins-export-of-coronavirus-vaccines-to-six-nations-357837

 

Myanmar, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Bhutan, Nepal, the Maldives and the Seychelles will start to vaccinate their people very soon. With the Astra Zeneca vaccine, produced under licence in India. All these countries will start to vaccinate and to protect their citizens long before Thailand will start.

 

Thailand number one again. This time number one in possibly willingly delaying the vaccination, for ridiculous and hypocritical reasons, for omission of ordering the vaccines early enough.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, webfact said:

“The global population is more than 7 billion. Just 50 per cent of population would need 8 billion vaccines since each person has to take two doses.


Math is not Dr Yong's strong point.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

No discussion as to why Thai FDA approved a less tested Chinese vaccine and not Moderna or Pfizer which has been approved in Western countries and. Given to close to 20 million people already. Approval would mean private hospitals could procure and offer to those that want it and can pay - even if the govt distributed AZ for free to Thais 

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Chelseafan said:

Dr Yong explained. “The global population is more than 7 billion. Just 50 per cent of population would need 8 billion vaccines since each person has to take two doses. So it will be impossible to vaccinate everybody within this year.”

 

Maybe maths aint his strong point. 7 Billion vacines not 8 Billion...

World population is currently stated at being a smidgen below 8 billion (7,794,798,739) so I suspect he was simply rounding up. He should have simply said said nearly 8 billion rather than “more than 7 billion“.

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Lingba said:

they mention general differences between the Pfizer moderna AZ and Sino but I wish they would detail the differences more in laymans terms...i.e anedovirus and nanoparticles...and how they differ

But that's obvious to most of us here. This is a forum for experts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Chelseafan said:

Dr Yong explained. “The global population is more than 7 billion. Just 50 per cent of population would need 8 billion vaccines since each person has to take two doses. So it will be impossible to vaccinate everybody within this year.”

 

Maybe maths aint his strong point. 7 Billion vacines not 8 Billion...

 

Yeah, these guys are so used to "adding" a little extra on top...

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

2 hours ago, Flying Saucage said:

 

Well, have a look to this nice article of yesterday:

 

https://www.wionews.com/india-news/goodwill-gesture-india-begins-export-of-coronavirus-vaccines-to-six-nations-357837

 

Myanmar, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Bhutan, Nepal, the Maldives and the Seychelles will start to vaccinate their people very soon. With the Astra Zeneca vaccine, produced under licence in India. All these countries will start to vaccinate and to protect their citizens long before Thailand will start.

 

Thailand number one again. This time number one in possibly willingly delaying the vaccination, for ridiculous and hypocritical reasons, for omission of ordering the vaccines early enough.

 

Yes, true, but those countries are are riddled with Covid.  I just think it makes sense for those highly infected countries to be vaccinated first. While counties that have Covid under control will be last on the list. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Chelseafan said:

Dr Yong explained. “The global population is more than 7 billion. Just 50 per cent of population would need 8 billion vaccines since each person has to take two doses. So it will be impossible to vaccinate everybody within this year.”

 

Maybe maths aint his strong point. 7 Billion vacines not 8 Billion...

I believe all of the vaccines available currently require 2 shots (doses)spaced a couple weeks apart so his math is probably accurate this time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, daveAustin said:

Another reason why Oxford vaccine (perhaps others) was so quick and also effective is it has basically been in development for years (possible decade(s)) for such a scenario. It's not a last minute, rush to get it out thing. 

..Scientists were aware of Corona virus variants back in 2004 and went to China in a field study..it was predicted by her in a medical paper that the Corona virus would be a hug problem in years to come..no-one took her serious and no drug company was prpeared to outlay the funds to develop a vaccine.

My reference is: Professor Vincent Racianello in This Week in Virology, YouTube Podcast series.

Link to post
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, 5633572526 said:

I believe all of the vaccines available currently require 2 shots (doses)spaced a couple weeks apart so his math is probably accurate this time.


It is already being discussed in Big Pharma, that a 3rd shot may be necessary. If that is really necessary to obtain immunity, or if it is just to gain more profit is unknown.

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Phaser said:

No discussion as to why Thai FDA approved a less tested Chinese vaccine and not Moderna or Pfizer which has been approved in Western countries and. Given to close to 20 million people already. Approval would mean private hospitals could procure and offer to those that want it and can pay - even if the govt distributed AZ for free to Thais 

 

Exactly - he doesn't actually explain "why Thailand chose AstraZeneca’s viral vector vaccine", as promised by the headline. And the question in the article of "Sinovac or AstraZeneca: Which is better?" isn't one that anyone is actually asking; what people really want to know is why it appears that Pfizer and Moderna weren't considered at all. If the government decided that they're too expensive, too difficult to deal with, or too hard to procure (due to late ordering), just say so.

Link to post
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, khunjeff said:

Exactly - he doesn't actually explain "why Thailand chose AstraZeneca’s viral vector vaccine", as promised by the headline. And the question in the article of "Sinovac or AstraZeneca: Which is better?" isn't one that anyone is actually asking; what people really want to know is why it appears that Pfizer and Moderna weren't considered at all. If the government decided that they're too expensive, too difficult to deal with, or too hard to procure (due to late ordering), just say so.

 

What people really want to know is when are we going to have something?  Anything? 

 

All he mentioned is 2 million doses on order out of the 140 million they'll need.  He didn't even say what stage of approval they're in for the AZ, nor how long before they pull the trigger.  Doesn't instill too much confidence in the future.  Nor provide any information to start planning the re-open, investment and recovery.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Don Chance said:

India is already way ahead.

And there could be a reason.

 

The pharmaceutical industry in India was valued at US$33 billion in 2017 and generic drugs account for 20 per cent of global exports in terms of volume, making the country the largest provider of generic medicines globally.[]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pharmaceutical_industry_in_India#:~:text=The pharmaceutical industry in India,provider of generic medicines globally.&text=India's biopharmaceutical industry clocked a 17 percent growth with revenues of Rs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

100+ years after detection of cancer, 40+ years after AIDS, 20+ years after SARS and Ebola - no vaccination whatsoever on the market.

Comes along a new virus of the Corona family and within 9 months, almost simultaneously, vaccines are on the market invented by America, Germany, Switzerland, Russia, China and most likely Japan?

 
Makes me wonder, what the hell is really going on …..
 

CHINA is buying 100 million doses of German-made vaccine for its local population. 

 

At the same time, it’s selling its “made-in-China” vaccine to mainly 3rd-World countries. If the Chinese don’t trust their own vaccine ........ go figure! 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-12-16/china-secures-100-million-doses-of-biontech-shot-to-boost-supply

Link to post
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, khunjeff said:

 

Exactly - he doesn't actually explain "why Thailand chose AstraZeneca’s viral vector vaccine", as promised by the headline. And the question in the article of "Sinovac or AstraZeneca: Which is better?" isn't one that anyone is actually asking; what people really want to know is why it appears that Pfizer and Moderna weren't considered at all. If the government decided that they're too expensive, too difficult to deal with, or too hard to procure (due to late ordering), just say so.

Possibly because Pfizer and Moderna are use a technology (mRNA) which has never been used on humans before, rushed through testing and delared safe on the basis of a miniscule sample. Maybe a good idea to wait and see if large numbers of GM Westerners start developing side effects after taking it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...