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Hydrogen Peroxide


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Any body know where to buy in Pattaya. I used to buy it in Boots at the Avenue but when I went in yesterday they said they not have. I tried another Boots and a Fascino but got the same answer.

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Hydrogen peroxide is a chemical compound with the formula H2O2 and has been used as a first aid antiseptic for injured skin since the 1920’s. The simplest peroxide, it is used as an antiseptic agent,

Hydrogen Peroxide will get the blood out without bleaching out the colors (as much). Highly recommended by Dexter.

Please move these posts to the Serial Killers Forum....😂😂😂

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On Third Rd, the pharmacy along from Dr Opas surgery has it. 

Good for all stains, said to be environmentally friendly as reverts to just being water after a few hours exposure to light. Not sure about air. 

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If you buy it in pharmacies, be aware, it may be 6% versus the standard 3%.  I've bought 6% bottles (same cost as 3%) and cut it with water.  It seems to have the same effect.

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3 hours ago, scubascuba3 said:

What's it good for?

General cleaning solution and for cleaning cuts and wounds. Antiseptic. Comes in s different strengths. i.e. 3%, 6%

 

I use it to clean the shower stall. Smells a bit vinegary but works.

Edited by phetphet
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3 hours ago, rott said:

On Third Rd, the pharmacy along from Dr Opas surgery has it. 

Good for all stains, said to be environmentally friendly as reverts to just being water after a few hours exposure to light. Not sure about air. 

I think that's why it comes in a brown bottle, and it says store in a cool, dark place.

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7 hours ago, scubascuba3 said:

What's it good for?

Well, the surviving pockets of Covidiots of FB USA are apparently now fiddling about with it! But normal folks bleach their hair or apply a little to minor abrasions, it's fun to watch it foam as it kills biota! Can be used to nuke your mouth, but DON'T swallow it, and rinse well right away! I believe it removes blood stains too. And there's a gardening use that escapes me. it'll all be on google.

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3 hours ago, TXTony said:

Please don’t use hydrogen peroxide on wounds. That’s old school thinking that has been proven to be the wrong course of action towards healing. 

Okay, can you unpack that a little? As in: Why not? thx

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9 hours ago, pomchop said:

Hydrogen peroxide is a chemical compound with the formula H2O2 and has been used as a first aid antiseptic for injured skin since the 1920’s. The simplest peroxide, it is used as an antiseptic agent, bleaching agent and an oxidizer. It is a common ‘go to’ when there is a wound, and it can usually be found in most household’s first aid kits.

As a young child, I remember my mom would rush to get the hydrogen peroxide to wash out our cuts and burns. The blood and other living cells found in a wound use the catalase enzyme to attack the hydrogen peroxide and convert it to (water) H2O and (oxygen) O2. In its low concentration, hydrogen peroxide will start a bubbling action which helps remove debris from the wound and work to kill bacteria cells by destroying their cell walls.

Here is where it all gets tricky. Although hydrogen peroxide is thought to be a good first aid antiseptic, the controversy remains on how beneficial it actually is in the long run. As a wound care specialist, I see wounds all the time that are stuck in a certain phase of wound healing and the wound struggles to progress forward. What it comes down to for me is giving the wound the best chance possible at healing and ultimately wound closure.

After years of research, we now know that the caustic nature of hydrogen peroxide and rubbing alcohol (another commonly used first aid antiseptic) can destroy healthy cells and therefore affect wound healing. If peroxide is used, it is definitely not recommended on a long-term basis.

The bactericidal effects of the hydrogen peroxide are great to clean the wound and kill bacteria initially, but this same benefit comes with a price in that the peroxide can damage skin cells and angiogenesis which is the process of new vessel formation. So for me, the benefits do not outweigh the risks. I see a lot of complex and chronic wounds and it is my job to not only determine the wound etiology but also deduct all aspects of what may be causing the wound to not improve, as well as manage everything that may delay wound healing.

People on certain medications will have delayed wound healing potential as well as people with other co-morbidities such as rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes. These individuals are starting the wound healing cascade already impeded by low healing potential, so pouring hydrogen peroxide on their wounds even initially can drastically affect their chance of ever healing.

For diabetic patients, especially after a skin injury, the odds of healing not only stack up against you but they do so quickly. My approach has always been to take all steps possible to heal wounds in the shortest amount of time and to decrease the risk of infection which may lead to delayed wound healing, and in some individuals limb loss.

So the question is not whether hydrogen peroxide is beneficial. That is not up for debate - there are many good uses for it, just not on wounds. Wounds can instead be cleaned with mild soap and water immediately after an injury.

On a long-term basis, there are a myriad of wound cleansing options available which will help to remove biofilm and reduce bioburden in the wound but not affect the healthy skin cells. Allowing the proliferation of fibroblast cells in the wound cells that play an important role in forming new granulation tissue and getting the wound healed.

Although the debate on the effectiveness of using hydrogen peroxide on wounds may continue, one thing that is certain is wound care has grown so much especially over the past 20 years.

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Is Betadine\Iodine better for wounds?

Edited by scubascuba3
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My Mum's entire list of things needed to treat wounds, sterilize everything and anything, remove stains, clean her dentures, clean the floor/walls/toilet/sink, prepare wood for painting, clean the doorstep, clean windows, clean silverware, clear blocked drains, clean the oven, tie-dye my 70's tee-shirts, and bake a fantastic pavlova, consisted of basically three things; Hydrogen peroxide, vinegar, and bicarbonate of soda.  

 

Note: Don't put the peroxide in your pavlova.

 

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2 hours ago, phetphet said:

Sorry you feel that way. It wasn't meant to be snarky in anyway.

You are forgiven then. I hope you can do the same for me and that we can be friends. 

🙁

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2 hours ago, scubascuba3 said:

Have some red wine tonight

Tonight is cocoa, beer and wine is tomorrow. But thanks for the thought. 

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1 hour ago, rott said:

You are forgiven then. I hope you can do the same for me and that we can be friends. 

🙁

No problem at all. When I read my post back I saw that it could have been misconstrued, but it was only meant in a good way.

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Can I use it for keeping my water tank clean?

 

I have a 1500lt tank that I used to pour in a couple of glugs of bleach to keep it clean, but the wife and kids started coming out in hives and rashes so stopped doing that.

 

Would Hydrogen Peroxide help keep the tank clean without giving the family hives and rashes?

 

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8 hours ago, Daffy D said:

Would Hydrogen Peroxide help keep the tank clean without giving the family hives and rashes?

The dirt comes in with the utility water and the best you can do is give it time to settle and perhaps a very small amount of a chlorine based chemical to help it. In-line filters will stop solids getting in if installed upstream, providing the supply pressure is good.... I have one fitted just up from the washing machine. If you are particularly fastidious draining the tank occasionally and maybe use a hose to clean it could be done. 

Edited by jacko45k
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