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Top Thai footballer killed in 'big bike" collision with 18 wheel truck


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Picture: Daily News

 

Daily News reported on the death in a motorcycle accident of the goalkeeper of the Army United football team. 

 

He was Sergeant Suphachart Apichatyanon. 

 

He was riding a big bike when he collided with an 18 wheel truck on Saengchuto Road heading into Kanchanaburi in the west of Thailand. 

 

The driver of the truck said he was turning into a factory when the rider came at speed, lost control and was tragically crushed to death. 

 

Look Kae police arrived at the scene at the turning to a sugar refinery.

 

The victim had been riding a Suzuki GSXR 1,000 cc machine without plates. The 33 year old rider was dead at the scene.

 

He was a soldier attached to a Kanchanaburi regiment.

 

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2 hours ago, LivinLOS said:
7 hours ago, webfact said:

The driver of the truck said he was turning into a factory when the rider came at speed, lost control and was tragically crushed to death. 

Sounds like he turned into the bikes line of travel.. But its the bike riders fault because hes not here to say otherwise.

The story doesn't make clear if the truck had slowed to turn left into the factory, or right across the bike's path. Either way, it seems the motorcyclist wasn't looking ahead and wasn't prepared for it. Nothing new there.

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5 hours ago, richard_smith237 said:

In using this same conclusion it could be argued that no other car other than a Toyota Yaris or Honda Jazz is necessary in Thailands roads and all vehicles should be limited to 50 HP.....  

Hahaha ..., Toyota Yaris or Honda Jazz, do you want diving in the rain on the Pattaya roads?

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6 hours ago, Card said:

All bike bikes should have a sock stuffed up their back side 

Try putting some corn kernels in there so when it gets up to temperature, they start spitting out popcorn as the put along. Much more amusing than a sock.

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I have never really understood the sense of driving a big bike in Thailand. The roads are some of the most dangerous, many of the drivers are some of the least skilled, and few practice real defensive driving. Why risk life and limb? 

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12 minutes ago, spidermike007 said:

I have never really understood the sense of driving a big bike in Thailand. The roads are some of the most dangerous, many of the drivers are some of the least skilled, and few practice real defensive driving. Why risk life and limb? 

That argument could be used for any motorcycle at all when someone can readily afford a car.

The same argument could be applied when someone drives a smaller car when they could be driving a larger sedan or SUV.

 

There is also another facet that many non-riders fail to identify. 

 

Larger bikes are simply far more stable at ‘highway speeds’ and can travel with the flow of traffic where as a smaller scooter (i.e. Honda wave etc) may be more ideal for the city or busy towns but are far from ideal once the speed exceeds 60kmh - consider size of tyre contact patch and braking capacity, in addition consider the potential for a larger bike to accelerate out of trouble. 

 

Thus: the size of the bike itself is not the only factor. The primary factor is of course the mentality of the rider. 

 

An additional and perhaps subconscious yet immeasurable facet is the ‘visibility’ factor. 

Thailand is a ‘money’ orientated society - those riding a 1000cc bikes are likely not to be poor and are thus somehow more ‘noticed’....  perhaps this is wrong and its just perception but it seems this way.

 

Personally, I feel no need for a 1000cc sports bike in Thailand. I’d feel no need for such a vehicle other than on a track.... yet there are larger motorcycles which are comfortable to ride over longer distances for touring. I see these bikes as ideal if one wants to do more than potter around town (i.e. BMW F850GS, Triumph Tiger even the NC750X etc etc )....  

 

 

 

 

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R.I.P. young man....

 

i throughly enjoy riding motorcycles of all types over 50 years. You need to be alert at all times and know your own limitations... 

 

Read the specs as I’m not familiar with this model.... the following is from the details of this moto.

 

*The Traction Control System is not a substitute for the rider’s throttle control. It cannot prevent loss of traction due to excessive speed when the rider enters a turn and/or applies the brakes. Neither can it prevent the front wheel from losing grip.

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55 minutes ago, richard_smith237 said:

Happened to me just this week.. In  car. 

 

Travelling along with the speed of traffic... 

 

I saw a lorry at the U-Turn up ahead.... knowing Thailand I figured the driver of the lorry (articulated) figured he had enough time to pull out and execute his U-Turn and of course being the ‘larger vehicle’ had the unwritten (and illegal) right to bully his way across the traffic. 

I was in the left most lane and casually slowed. 

A pickup to my right didn’t and continued on at speed... The driver probably wasn’t looking ahead or was ‘forcing’ the lorry not to U-Turn.

 

The lorry U-Turned anyway.... the pick up locked up, skidded but didn’t loose control. The U-Turning lorry was followed by another lorry and other cars had to brake hard as they miss-timed it thinking they could ’slip past’ behind the u-turning lorry (in the right most lane) but were cut off by the second lorry. 

 

I’m not sure if many (Thai) drivers don’t look well ahead and predict and prepare for what may unfold or if they ‘drive’ with an excessive degree of assertion to prevent others from executing a manoeuvre forcing them to slow down by which time its sometimes too late to stop. 

 

Either way..... the U-Turns are lethal, but the manner in which some drivers approach them is also lethal - its as if they will do anything to avoid giving way or slowing slightly. 

 

 

I encountered a controlled U-turn, with traffic lights, today.

1270997484_Screenshot2021-12-28at21-32-09GoogleMaps.png.ee754aebae5c9765c28e19b07860b637.png

 

I've never seen one before.

 

I would be very surprised indeed if any Aseanow reader gets out less than I do.

 

 

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1 hour ago, richard_smith237 said:

Happened to me just this week.. In  car. 

 

Travelling along with the speed of traffic... 

 

I saw a lorry at the U-Turn up ahead.... knowing Thailand I figured the driver of the lorry (articulated) figured he had enough time to pull out and execute his U-Turn and of course being the ‘larger vehicle’ had the unwritten (and illegal) right to bully his way across the traffic. 

I was in the left most lane and casually slowed. 

A pickup to my right didn’t and continued on at speed... The driver probably wasn’t looking ahead or was ‘forcing’ the lorry not to U-Turn.

 

The lorry U-Turned anyway.... the pick up locked up, skidded but didn’t loose control. The U-Turning lorry was followed by another lorry and other cars had to brake hard as they miss-timed it thinking they could ’slip past’ behind the u-turning lorry (in the right most lane) but were cut off by the second lorry. 

 

I’m not sure if many (Thai) drivers don’t look well ahead and predict and prepare for what may unfold or if they ‘drive’ with an excessive degree of assertion to prevent others from executing a manoeuvre forcing them to slow down by which time its sometimes too late to stop. 

 

Either way..... the U-Turns are lethal, but the manner in which some drivers approach them is also lethal - its as if they will do anything to avoid giving way or slowing slightly. 

 

 

1 - they don't look ahead, or 2 - if they do it's, as you allude to, the usual Me First mentality. I absolutely refuse to drive here because I don't suffer fools gladly, and let my wife take the wheel. I really have no idea why, but she's a very good driver and even looks far, far ahead and reacts accordingly. She did take proper lessons in Bangkok, and must have struck lucky and found an instructor who himself knew how to drive, which might explain it. 

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nothing wrong with big bikes, and nothing wrong with a relatively small minority of big bike riders - sadly.

 

the majority of big bike riders I see drive too fast, too aggressive, have annoying mods on their exhausts that sound like the moto 500cc grand prix when going just 35 kph.

 

last example was today when a group of three came up behind me in the city, drove way too close to me before squeezing me towards a car, forcing me to brake to let the d*ckheads pass.

I can only hope nobody else will get hurt when they will likely meet their fate around some pole or against a truck.

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Big bike with no plates, sounds like it could have been new to this

driver, so no experience of having to stop quickly maybe.  I have seen

a few accidents while being in Thailand and seen many drivers who were

not experienced but doing foolish things. 

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I ride big bikes in Thailand. In principle they are safer than scooters. I do notice the riders like to show off their prized trophy more so and feel more superior to the smaller bike riders. They cannot see themselves being overtaken by anything as it will hurt their pride. It is similar to sports car drivers cutting in and out of traffic because they are entitled to it in their minds. Of course the bigger the bike the bigger the ego and pride. I see this on a scale starting from nmax type scooters all the way up to 1000cc. In this case I’d say it was the riders fault. As riders we must assume worst case scenarios ALWAYS and prepare in advance. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/28/2021 at 9:01 PM, spidermike007 said:

I have never really understood the sense of driving a big bike in Thailand. The roads are some of the most dangerous, many of the drivers are some of the least skilled, and few practice real defensive driving. Why risk life and limb? 

The only way I’d choose to drive my car over riding the big bike is when it’s pissing rain, we’re relying on the story that the biker likely wasn’t looking or whatever, sadly there’s only one side to tell, so many times I’ve seen big trucks suddenly cut across 2 or 3 lanes to catch the U turn, been here long enough to know the standard of driving generally isn’t the same standard as many other countries therefore try to anticipate for such, especially at U turns and junctions,

 

whilst personally I’m not into big noise exhausts and never modified any of my bikes as such, i have installed additional lighting on the bike and I do believe that these can alert other road users to the motorcycle and could potentially save a life, particularly in the scenarios of big trucks at U turns, 

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