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Would you put down your dog rather than give it away


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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, proton said:

Not all just 90%, most leave their dogs in the yard barking all day while they are at work, or put them in cages. The idea of taking them for a walk is seen as some crazy foreign notion. too many just want a dog to show off with. Almost the first thing they will tell you is how much their dirty, drooling barking pest cost. IMO all dog owners have some sort of personality disorder, Thais are just a bit worse.

Wow, with that statistic, I'm assuming you've gone to every single household in the country of 67 million people? Seems you have low-quality friends you surround yourself with. 

Similar as with almost all countries. Dogs left in cages for weeks with almost no food. Not being walked. Beating them. Not much new.

Edited by ThLT
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I don't know which home country you are talking about, but I suspect Australia.

 

Better put him through the trauma of quarantine, than the trauma of being put to death.

 

We shipped our cat back to the US, granted no quarantine, but it was a pain in the ass and it was several days in transit.

 

She was traumatized for a week or so, but as I watch her now playing in front of me with our other cats, well worth it.

 

I could never have left her in Thailand. The best I could hope would have someone would feed her, but Thai's in general don't love their pets like Westerners do

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General animal care and wealth dependeds on wealth, education, experience and how emotionally they get connected to their animals. 

 

But in general I find farm animals, village dogs, stray dogs, cats and caged birds in very poor caring. 

 

More educated wealthy Thais do have resources to care better in general.

 

I have been thinking about my animals if something would happen to our relationship one way or the other what to do.

 

The funny thing, I got sheep's to give lamb to eat, and my family will not eat them but rather sell them.

 

Doing my best to convince them that animals that is well cared for being the best food for us, and not give them away to some place you do not know what they coming to.

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55 minutes ago, The Hammer2021 said:

Even the British  Daily Mail wouldn't  publish  a headline like this.

I wouldn't bet on that.

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2 hours ago, Denim said:

Take him to a temple like everyone else. Plenty of friends and grub. He will soon fit in and find his place in his new home. 

Before you leave him there full time take him for walkies there so he can smell and be smelt and learn the lay of the land.

 

Better than killing him.

We will take you to the temple and leave you there, I'm sure you will fit in.

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3 hours ago, GinBoy2 said:

I don't know which home country you are talking about, but I suspect Australia.

 

Better put him through the trauma of quarantine, than the trauma of being put to death.

 

We shipped our cat back to the US, granted no quarantine, but it was a pain in the ass and it was several days in transit.

 

She was traumatized for a week or so, but as I watch her now playing in front of me with our other cats, well worth it.

 

I could never have left her in Thailand. The best I could hope would have someone would feed her, but Thai's in general don't love their pets like Westerners do

I am sorry but the nuances in my OP have been lost due to haphazard editing and the introduction of typos and spelling mistakes.

 

To be clear I am talking about a situation where I would have to leave Thailand in a hurry.  Medical emergency or the cancellation of all expat visas due to a war in Taiwan (and Thailand siding with China) are two relevant examples.

 

In such a situation it would not be logistically possible for me to organise expatriation of my dogly.  He would, at best have to spend a very extended period in the care of a Thai.

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Mods.  Can you please close this thread.  The haphazard editing of my OP has removed the key elements of my post and also introduced several spelling mistakes and typos.

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39 minutes ago, Adumbration said:

I am sorry but the nuances in my OP have been lost due to haphazard editing and the introduction of typos and spelling mistakes.

 

To be clear I am talking about a situation where I would have to leave Thailand in a hurry.  Medical emergency or the cancellation of all expat visas due to a war in Taiwan (and Thailand siding with China) are two relevant examples.

 

In such a situation it would not be logistically possible for me to organise expatriation of my dogly.  He would, at best have to spend a very extended period in the care of a Thai.

And your gf?

 

What kind of dog? I'm sure many decent people would adopt your dog in that case, or something you should start organizing like a catastrophe prepper does 

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7 hours ago, Denim said:

Take him to a temple like everyone else. Plenty of friends and grub. He will soon fit in and find his place in his new home. 

Before you leave him there full time take him for walkies there so he can smell and be smelt and learn the lay of the land.

 

Better than killing him.

Sounds fair to me.

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Just wait for the local monk to come padding around.

Then decide if you pop the little fella or your GF into the bowl. Maybe both.

Problem(s) solved.

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A sad state of affairs concerning your pets. If you can’t make a life long commitment to them you shouldn’t own one. I had mine for 16 years and 18 years respectively. Yes it cost a lot more to take care when they get older and euthanasia is very hard to come by even when they are terminally ill. I believe that in that circumstance it is acceptable, but to just put down a dog because you don’t want to take care of it anymore is heartless. 

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10 hours ago, ThailandRyan said:

Find a nice Cambodian family, they love there dogs....

So long as they are marinated overnight that is 😆

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Take him to a shelter and make a very generous donation. Animal Army, Soi Dogs or Hope For Strays, among others. Could you really kill your perfectly healthy best little friend??? I couldn't and doubtful you could either. 

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10 hours ago, JeffersLos said:

I wouldn't have a dog because they're dirty and annoying. 

I prefer dogs to most people.

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11 hours ago, Adumbration said:

I have dog. 

 

He is a tiny little bloke.

 

He is my best friend and a constant source of joy.  I love him.

 

My long term Thai GF is ok taking care him food wise, but despite my constant reminders she still, after nearly a decade, will do stupid things like let him out unsupervised or not watch him carefully enough when other dogs are present.  He has almost been killed be a car on a number of occassions (all because of my GF) and he has been attacked by much larger dog on two occassions (both because of her also).  The second occassion could of been fatal.  Lots of stitches and medication and a vet bill just shy of 40K

 

My GF loves him as well butn ot a priority for looking at facebook above all else.

 

If I was forced to leave Thailand in a hurry (for whatever reason) I could not take him with me at short notice because my home country has the strictest quantine rules for dogs in the whole world.

 

If I was not around I would not be comfortable leaving him with my GF.  It might also be the case if we were no longer together she would head off to work in Korea with her older sister.  If she had my little bloke then he would end up with her mum up on the farm in Nakon Nowhere and that would be a death sentence for him.

 

Mostly they are just a little better off then fending for themselves on the street.

 

My current gut feeling is that I would be more (comfortable for the want the correct word) euthanizing him rather than leaving him.

 

What would you do?

You are brave to put this up here for discussion.

I also saw many people in this country treating their own pets badly.

<deleted>ty food,  not even spending a few hundred baht on a visit to the vet, and when an animal dies i.e. after a year then just get a new one. Sad.

 

In that way I can understand that you don't want that your dog suffers like that.

 

You obviously don't want to kill your dog, you want that you or someone else who is responsible cares for him. So if you think you might have to go away on short notice then better start to search now for a reliable person who could and would take care of your dog the way you want it. There are good people out there. Find them!

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I have found a few Thai freinds I would and have trusted with my dogs.

Now if you are paying someone to take care of him they may get different care than if you just leave him with them.

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12 hours ago, ThailandRyan said:

Find a nice Cambodian family, they love there dogs....

I hear black dogs are preferred for their flavour.

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Posted (edited)

I feel your pain.  I can envision that someday I'll be in the identical situation (no Thai gf though, just not be able to take him) and have asked myself the same question.  Many of the posts here remind me of anti-abortionists - very ready to tell someone else it's immoral and to keep the baby, but not ready to step up, adopt, and take the responsibility themselves.

 

Just as I think it's merciful to put a dog down whose health or circumstances don't allow it the joy of being a dog (chasing sticks and food, marking territory and feeling safe and secure with their pack, etc.), the dog's mental health needs to be considered.  My dog has been with me since its birth, and I don't think it will "easily adapt" without me.  I was once with a dog whose mate was killed, and she wept and was depressed for weeks - just like a human, and wasn't the same afterwards (eventually she ran away and I never saw her again -- did she die a miserable death?)

 

I know that I will feel better knowing that my dog is not suffering somewhere.    

Edited by GiveMeAColdOne
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This is a tough decision and you have my fullest sympathies... 

 

I had a sick dog many yrs ago and put her to sleep in USA and it haunted me for years... but leaving your little buddy would have the same effect... 

 

I hope it does not come to this... your heart will be broken either way. 

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14 hours ago, habanero said:

You would have a hard time anyway finding a vet that would put the dog down. They just don't do that in Thailand. It's a Buddhist thing! 

True but if the dog has rabies they may be put down . Here they let very sick dogs suffer rather than ending their lives . A guy near me took his dog to the vets because it was clearly in a bad state of health and just skin & bones . The vet refused to put the dog down and instead just cleaned the diseased areas . The dog could hardly walk and was clearly suffering so this guy put the dog down himself with heavy emotion as he had the dog for 15 years  

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You want a dog you have a dog and you love your dog but you want your GF to take care of the dog, why you not taking care of your loved dog.

It's cruel and tragic to put down a healthy dog..

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Posted (edited)

Give him away.  At a worst case scenario see if a Thai temple will take him.

Killing an animal because you can't take care of them really is a sort of sick Westerner way of handling pets.  One little jab and you absolve yourself of the responsibility that comes with raising a pet.  It's not right - morally.  And good luck finding a vet who is willing to put down an otherwise healthy animal.

You took on the responsibility - now find your pet a new home. 

Edited by connda
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, GiveMeAColdOne said:

I feel your pain.  I can envision that someday I'll be in the identical situation (no Thai gf though, just not be able to take him) and have asked myself the same question.  Many of the posts here remind me of anti-abortionists - very ready to tell someone else it's immoral and to keep the baby, but not ready to step up, adopt, and take the responsibility themselves.

 

Just as I think it's merciful to put a dog down whose health or circumstances don't allow it the joy of being a dog (chasing sticks and food, marking territory and feeling safe and secure with their pack, etc.), the dog's mental health needs to be considered.  My dog has been with me since its birth, and I don't think it will "easily adapt" without me.  I was once with a dog whose mate was killed, and she wept and was depressed for weeks - just like a human, and wasn't the same afterwards (eventually she ran away and I never saw her again -- did she die a miserable death?)

 

I know that I will feel better knowing that my dog is not suffering somewhere.    

We do everything together. He loves to sit up front when I ride my motorbike and also when driving my car.  He is a celebrity in my and the neighbouring villages.  Everyone knows him by name.  I should note that these villages are mostly muslim as well. A number of my muslim friends have come up with "special" rules regarding handling my dog because he is so tiny and lovable and they just cant help themselves.  Several say it is ok to hold and pat him because he is really a cat and not a dog.  Others have explained to me that it is ok for a muslim to touch a dog as long as it is not wet.  I should add here that I speak very good Thai and so it is not a misinterpretation on my part.

 

My little bloke is very dependant on me, and I on him also.  As I posted in my OP I love him.  I am certain neither of us will cope if we are separated.

Edited by Adumbration
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15 hours ago, JeffersLos said:

I wouldn't have a dog because they're dirty and annoying. 

So are humans. I guess that means you have no friends either?

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35 minutes ago, connda said:

Killing an animal because you can't take care of them really is a sort of sick Westerner way of handling pets.   

No.  It is not because I can't take care of him.  It would be because I do not want him to suffer because of poor care from a Thai, or be run over by a car, or be attacked and killed by another dog.

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15 hours ago, Adumbration said:

I have been here a very long time and am well aware of this issue.  I would attend to the task myself.

Just to give you some updated info, i recently had a cat which needed to be put down around the middle of BKK- I found 3 vets all willing to do it on a house call within a 2km radius, but they did insist on inspecting the cat before accepting to do it to make sure it was a terminal case and the animal was in pain.

 

I know a similar situation and an doctor put an animal down in Samui recently on a house call, again with prior seeing the animal. So its probably easier than it used to be.

 

They are not going to put down a healthy animal though, and why would you want to put down your healthy dog, through fear of it being not taken care of. Seems like this is to make you feel better rather than the dog. I am sure if you asked the dog he would not want to be put down... he probably loves being out and about roaming without any parental supervision.

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2 minutes ago, smutcakes said:

They are not going to put down a healthy animal though, and why would you want to put down your healthy dog, through fear of it being not taken care of. Seems like this is to make you feel better rather than the dog. I am sure if you asked the dog he would not want to be put down... he probably loves being out and about roaming without any parental supervision.

Good points.  Of course he loves being out and about.  I take him with me absolutely everwhere I go (with the exception of Lotus because the security guard stops me).  I also take him for a run on the beach every morning and every evening.  He comes out in my boat when I go fishing.  He also loves to mark everything as his territory, which is hilarious because he is only 2.5kg.  I think his body consists of about 10% bone and tissue and 90% urine.

 

In family law the overiding rule regarding custody of a child is "What is in the best interest of the child?".  Sure my dog would much rather not be put down.  BUT is it in his best interests to leave him with a Thai with a significant risk he will not be cared for properly, killed in traffic, or ripped to pieces by a soi dog.

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2 minutes ago, Adumbration said:

Good points.  Of course he loves being out and about.  I take him with me absolutely everwhere I go (with the exception of Lotus because the security guard stops me).  I also take him for a run on the beach every morning and every evening.  He comes out in my boat when I go fishing.  He also loves to mark everything as his territory, which is hilarious because he is only 2.5kg.  I think his body consists of about 10% bone and tissue and 90% urine.

 

In family law the overiding rule regarding custody of a child is "What is in the best interest of the child?".  Sure my dog would much rather not be put down.  BUT is it in his best interests to leave him with a Thai with a significant risk he will not be cared for properly, killed in traffic, or ripped to pieces by a soi dog.

I understand your concern, but would argue the 'possibility' of something happening does not justify the finality of you actually opting to do it.

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1 minute ago, smutcakes said:

I understand your concern, but would argue the 'possibility' of something happening does not justify the finality of you actually opting to do it.

To refer to another legal rubric it would come down to the balance of possibilities.

Is it more likely than not that he would not be cared for properly, or be killed in traffic, or by a soi dog, if left in the care of a Thai?

I know what my answer to this question is.

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