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Applying for Thai PR vs Citizenship. What should I do?


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Due to the uncertainty re my marriage Im now researching differences between applying for PR and Citizenship. I'm ready to start the docs for either (or both). I've previously read that its legal to apply for both in the same year. 
 
If I did apply for PR I think they will be wondering why Im applying when I could be going for Citizenship. What should I tell them?
 
  1. Applying in Bkk. I know my wife would have to attend SB for citizenship. What about for PR application?
-PR: Can I apply at the main immigration centre in Bkk and not in the province where I live (Ubon R. Isan) with no issues? Is this correct? Dont need to move my yellow book?
- Citizenship: Must move my yellow book to central bkk bc SB at my city has no idea and they actually told me to apply in bkk. A friend of a friend said that I can basically 'rent a room' 30k a year. My wife wants to leave her blue book in our city ie not move it. Any issues with that?
 
2. Language: Both need intermediate level?
- PR: do I need to learn the national anthem? If I cant sing it but can converse in thai with all other questions is this ok?
- Citizenship. Ive just finished learning standard questions that they might ask. I think I can easily learn the same for PR. But the national anthem I dont know yet bc I think its not required?
 
3. Divorce: If I apply for both PR and Citizenship this year
-PR: can get the stamp 'under consideration' after application is accepted. Losing ones WP / marriage visa has no issues at all for a PR application assuming docs have been accepted. True?
- Citizenship: I would have to advise them and then cancel the entire application?
 
4. Income: Ive been working via my wifes business for 3 years. We dont operate a company structure. She operates the business and pays taxes every 6 months via her personal name. I received my WP on this basis. Assume its no issue for both applications? In first year my salary was 80k a month. 2nd year 100k a month and 3rd 150k a month
-PR: Only needs 2 yrs taxes showing evidence of 100k a month? Is this correct:
- Citizenship: 3 yrs rule for WP and taxes?
 
5. When approved what do I get. Am I missing anything as below?
- PR: I get the residence book and can register on a blue book of my choice. No more 90 day or ext of stay. Can buy a condo not showing bank evidence.
- Ciitzenship: Get thai id card and passport. Can buy land/house in my name. Can vote after 5 yrs
 
In my situation do you think I should just apply for both as the docs must be the same? Then if my marriage passes the test of time then I can just withdraw from the PR application. Conversely can cancel Citizenship if it goes pair shaped.
 
Any comments are appreciated. many thanks for helping me. 
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20 minutes ago, DrJack54 said:

Age? 

What has age got to do with it?

 

As far as I know re number 3, the under consideration stamp is guaranteed as long as OP's docs are accepted.

good luck

Edited by advancebooking
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11 minutes ago, advancebooking said:

What has age got to do with it?

 

As far as I know re number 3, the under consideration stamp is guaranteed as long as OP's docs are accepted.

good luck

How rude.

If over 50 you have option to change from extension based on marriage to based on retirement.

Your opening line.....

"Due to the uncertainty re my marriage"..

 

Far easier to switch to based on retirement while still married.

 

 

Edit: I was thinking reply was from OP.

So @advancebooking give OP advice.

My guess you have none

 

 

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2 minutes ago, DrJack54 said:

How rude.

If over 50 you have option to change from extension based on marriage to based on retirement.

Your opening line.....

"Due to the uncertainty re my marriage"..

 

Far easier to switch to based on retirement while still married.

 

 

 

Dont think too much. Not intended to be rude. 

 

If you have no idea about a topic maybe you should not make a comment. Age has nothing to do with PR or citizenship. It has no relevance. Its bad advice to start talking about ext of stay based on retirement. Also, no relevance to the topic. 

 

 

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5 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:

If I did apply for PR I think they will be wondering why Im applying when I could be going for Citizenship. What should I tell them?

 

Just say you aren't ready to give up your current nationality.

 

5 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:

Language: Both need intermediate level?

 

Not really. Basic Thai is fine. 

 

5 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:
PR: Only needs 2 yrs taxes showing evidence of 100k a month? Is this correct:
- Citizenship: 3 yrs rule for WP and taxes?

 

Tax is an important point. Salary can be much less than 100K but you have to have 3 years of tax returns in your name in same employment. Losing job/WP while applying is a big problem.

 

5 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:
When approved what do I get. Am I missing anything as below?
- PR: I get the residence book and can register on a blue book of my choice. No more 90 day or ext of stay. Can buy a condo not showing bank evidence.
- Ciitzenship: Get thai id card and passport. Can buy land/house in my name. Can vote after 5 yrs

 

PR - also no TM30. But still need a WP to work legally. Need to get a visa to get a re-entry permit if you want to leave Thailand. But PR never expires as long as you visit Thailand annually (so not like US Green Card, Singapore PR etc, which you lose after a couple of years being out of country).

 

PR of course much more expensive than citizenship in terms of initial fees.

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Just now, advancebooking said:

Dont think too much. Not intended to be rude. 

 

If you have no idea about a topic maybe you should not make a comment. Age has nothing to do with PR or citizenship. It has no relevance. Its bad advice to start talking about ext of stay based on retirement. Also, no relevance to the topic. 

 

 

The OP has indicated no history for path to both options.

If marriage ends as the OP indicated then stop gap shift to extensions based on retirement enables ongoing stay in Thailand 

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10 minutes ago, advancebooking said:

If you have no idea about a topic maybe you should not make a comment

Please post your knowledge of obtaining Thai citizenship time frame and requirements 

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14 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:

5. When approved what do I get.

 

Mighty presumptuous of you, there is more to getting either than just chatting in Thai and earning some cash.

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1. you can have a bkk yellow book wifes blue can stay in issan

 

2 no language or songs required for citizenship if you have the required 50 points .  If you dont then you can add points with songs, reading and writing .

 

 

4 think this could be a issue as they normally want your company documents and VAT information 

 

5 yes same a born thai

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10 hours ago, BKKBike09 said:

Just say you aren't ready to give up your current nationality.

Right, why would one give up a nationality he values for a citizenship of convenience. 

 

I don't see how any Westerner could become Thai, out of love and respect for this "place".

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First check how many points you can obtain based on your current situation and how many more points you could 'easily' obtain if needed. Consider the timescale for each in conjunction with comments that you will see on another thread. 

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11 hours ago, DrJack54 said:

The OP has indicated no history for path to both options.

If marriage ends as the OP indicated then stop gap shift to extensions based on retirement enables ongoing stay in Thailand 

But to gain PR (nothave sure re citizenship) the applicant needs to have held a Thai work permit (WP) for at least 3 years prior to the PR application and WP continuing at the time of application for PR, therefore the applicant  must hold a relevant visa aligned to WP. 

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1 hour ago, scorecard said:

.....therefore the applicant  must hold a relevant visa aligned to WP.

Valid point.

My point is that since OP opening comment was.....

"Due to the uncertainty re my marriage...." 

He should have an alternative back up plan. 

Citizenship in particular bridge too far in short term. 

He works for the wife it would seem so any divorce would limit his options.

Hence my first post asking his age. 

 

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17 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:

If I did apply for PR I think they will be wondering why Im applying when I could be going for Citizenship. What should I tell them?

Nobody will ask you that question. But if they do, you can say you may consider it later, but at this stage it would make your life inconvenient as you're from country that you'd need a visa to visit or something like that. Well, that's my reason anyway.

 

17 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:

Applying in Bkk. I know my wife would have to attend SB for citizenship. What about for PR application?

No, you can apply alone and nobody needs to join you. Although she could. But if that happens, the officers will immediately switch to talking to her instead of you. As PR counter officers generally speak 0 English, unless your Thai is relatively good, it may be better to have someone with you who understands it perfectly. On question whether you have to apply in Bangkok - I have no idea, but it states at Chaeng Watthana Immigration that it's for Bangkok only. In the past I was told you would need to apply at local office but they would then send paperwork to Bangkok for approval. Not sure if that's still the case, maybe someone else can advise.

 

17 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:

Language: Both need intermediate level?

Ability to hold basic conversation in Thai is needed. There's no written test, it's just a conversation with the committee of uniformed officers asking questions, and you answering. Mine went into a very interesting and pleasant conversation with the most decorated guy in the room. It was actually very pleasant. But it's by no means seeking perfection in Thai language. Do note however that it is in formal, not spoken Thai. There's no singing of anthem for PR interview and I'm told not for citizenship anymore either.

 

17 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:
3. Divorce: If I apply for both PR and Citizenship this year
-PR: can get the stamp 'under consideration' after application is accepted. Losing ones WP / marriage visa has no issues at all for a PR application assuming docs have been accepted. True?

I don't think you can apply for both at the same time. Maybe you can, but in that case why would you apply for PR?

If you get your documents accepted (for PR, no idea about citizenship), you have a choice of continuing with your current visa, or switching to under consideration. Difference is that with current visa, you generally get 1 year extensions but need paperwork to extend, and re-entry permits last a year; but with under consideration stamps you only get 6 months so while you need basically no paperwork for extension, your re-entry permits only last the period of that 6 months. If you travel a lot that doubles their cost. On the flip side, at least in my case, the officers did all the photocopying for me and put me on top of the pile to get reentry permit immediately instead of waiting for my queue for hours. Obviously for re-entry permit you'd need to get extension first, then photocopy passport, only then you can apply. While you were supposed to be in same employment (and they'll send you letter of acceptance to company address - to pick up PR and pay the fee) I have heard of others who changed employment during this process and seems nobody asked them about it. But from immigration point of view, it is company that is asking you to work for them permanently, that's your reason for applying for PR. I would not gamble with it in that year to 18 months that it takes to complete approval. What you do after you get PR is no longer their concern.

 

17 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:
4. Income: Ive been working via my wifes business for 3 years. We dont operate a company structure. She operates the business and pays taxes every 6 months via her personal name. I received my WP on this basis. Assume its no issue for both applications? In first year my salary was 80k a month. 2nd year 100k a month and 3rd 150k a month
-PR: Only needs 2 yrs taxes showing evidence of 100k a month? Is this correct:

On the face of it, it looks OK, but they might scrutinize the company. When it comes to income, what they will want to see will be company paid taxes evidence (list of employees, their social security payments, company taxes paid for past years, map to business location, photos of you with the rest of employees and at your place of work, etc.). It's a lot of scrutiny of the company, far less of you, except to prove you've been paying taxes for the past 3 years as in December you apply the taxes for that year would not yet be completed nor due, so applying in December 2024 you would need to show taxes from 2022 and 2023.

 

17 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:
5. When approved what do I get. Am I missing anything as below?
- PR: I get the residence book and can register on a blue book of my choice. No more 90 day or ext of stay. Can buy a condo not showing bank evidence.

You would get appointment letter by post. It gives you a date to show up, usually within a week, with the fee (a bit less than 200k if not married, a bit less than 100k if married to Thai). You show up there with your passport and fee, and lots of photos. At this time my address has changed from the one I've applied with, and that did not seem to be a problem. They would take your fingerprints, and keep the passport. If you're early, they may process it same day, else in a couple of days. When you return, they'll have a blue PR book (Certificate of residence) for you and passport with previous visas and extensions cancelled and an approval stamp for permanent residence.

 

With this, you go to police station of the area where address you gave immigration on day of appointment is located. There you would hand over some photographs and blue book and passport, and they'll take a couple of hours to hand fill out a red (Alien registration) book. Here you have a choice of making it for 1 or 6 years - pick 6 years unless you plan to move soon after that. With this done, you then go to district office with the landlord of the property (unless you own a condo in your name, then that's yourself) to get your name entered into the blue (House registration) book. In case of someone else owning property, there would be witnesses required.

 

Once you've completed this, you go to another counter and ask for your pink ID card for 60 baht and 15 minutes wait, and you're done.

 

17 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:

In my situation do you think I should just apply for both as the docs must be the same?

I don't know, but I think it may be best to ask a lawyer or immigration officer on this. I've never heard of anyone that applied for both, and I don't think it would make sense to apply for PR if you're applying for citizenship, so your application might be denied, but whether that would affect the citizenship application I would not know.

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12 hours ago, advancebooking said:

Dont think too much. Not intended to be rude. 

 

If you have no idea about a topic maybe you should not make a comment. Age has nothing to do with PR or citizenship. It has no relevance. Its bad advice to start talking about ext of stay based on retirement. Also, no relevance to the topic. 

 

It has a ton of relevance if the OP is examining only 2 of the several long stay options and both of them are expensive and/or time consuming, with the citizenship option also being extremely low probability. 

 

Retirement is probably the easiest, cheapest and most assured.  But only if the OP's over 50.

 

 

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12 hours ago, advancebooking said:

Age has nothing to do with PR or citizenship. It has no relevance.

 

Actually it does since it forms part of the points system for PR, I believe 10 points out of 100.Can't recall exact details but I think it's weighted towards those in middle age with fewer points for younger and older people.But overall you're right - it doesn't count for much.

 

Actually I'm skeptical about the application of the points system.Basically one has to fulfill some minimum criteria and that's it.But one has to look and sound okay, ideally earn quite a bit more than the minimum salary quoted and have paid lots of tax.I think quite a few people waste time on getting letters of support and collating charitable activities.

 

 

 

 

 

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18 hours ago, ubonr1971 said:

Any comments are appreciated. many thanks for helping me. 

 

My suggestion would be to talk to people who have been down each path.  See what worked (and didn't) for them.  Don't count on what you read online.

 

When I first started working in Thailand, a few of my colleagues were doing the citizenship thing.  Long stays in Thailand.  Thai wives, Thai kids, old enough to be in school.  Big oilfield salaries.  Fluent in Thai.  When my contract ended 6 years later, they were all still doing interviews for the citizenship thing. 

 

That's a survey of only 3 cases and YMMV.  But talk to guys who have done it.  Over dinner, over a beer.  Face to face.

 

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36 minutes ago, impulse said:

 

It has a ton of relevance if the OP is examining only 2 of the several long stay options and both of them are expensive and/or time consuming, with the citizenship option also being extremely low probability. 

 

Retirement is probably the easiest, cheapest and most assured.  But only if the OP's over 50.

 

 

Seems his name showing 1971 would put him over 50.

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14 hours ago, DrJack54 said:

The OP has indicated no history for path to both options.

Actually I said above ''I'm ready to start the docs for either (or both)'' thereby implying I satisfy the WP/ tax docs requirements. 

 

Im not interested in discussions re retirement visas or whatever

 

I'm trying to ascertain which option to apply for this year or next and subsequently reaching out for any info on either options. 

 

Grateful for all the replies and still eager to learn more about applying for either option. 

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1 hour ago, tomazbodner said:

Nobody will ask you that question. But if they do, you can say you may consider it later, but at this stage it would make your life inconvenient as you're from country that you'd need a visa to visit or something like that. Well, that's my reason anyway.

 

No, you can apply alone and nobody needs to join you. Although she could. But if that happens, the officers will immediately switch to talking to her instead of you. As PR counter officers generally speak 0 English, unless your Thai is relatively good, it may be better to have someone with you who understands it perfectly. On question whether you have to apply in Bangkok - I have no idea, but it states at Chaeng Watthana Immigration that it's for Bangkok only. In the past I was told you would need to apply at local office but they would then send paperwork to Bangkok for approval. Not sure if that's still the case, maybe someone else can advise.

 

Ability to hold basic conversation in Thai is needed. There's no written test, it's just a conversation with the committee of uniformed officers asking questions, and you answering. Mine went into a very interesting and pleasant conversation with the most decorated guy in the room. It was actually very pleasant. But it's by no means seeking perfection in Thai language. Do note however that it is in formal, not spoken Thai. There's no singing of anthem for PR interview and I'm told not for citizenship anymore either.

 

I don't think you can apply for both at the same time. Maybe you can, but in that case why would you apply for PR?

If you get your documents accepted (for PR, no idea about citizenship), you have a choice of continuing with your current visa, or switching to under consideration. Difference is that with current visa, you generally get 1 year extensions but need paperwork to extend, and re-entry permits last a year; but with under consideration stamps you only get 6 months so while you need basically no paperwork for extension, your re-entry permits only last the period of that 6 months. If you travel a lot that doubles their cost. On the flip side, at least in my case, the officers did all the photocopying for me and put me on top of the pile to get reentry permit immediately instead of waiting for my queue for hours. Obviously for re-entry permit you'd need to get extension first, then photocopy passport, only then you can apply. While you were supposed to be in same employment (and they'll send you letter of acceptance to company address - to pick up PR and pay the fee) I have heard of others who changed employment during this process and seems nobody asked them about it. But from immigration point of view, it is company that is asking you to work for them permanently, that's your reason for applying for PR. I would not gamble with it in that year to 18 months that it takes to complete approval. What you do after you get PR is no longer their concern.

 

On the face of it, it looks OK, but they might scrutinize the company. When it comes to income, what they will want to see will be company paid taxes evidence (list of employees, their social security payments, company taxes paid for past years, map to business location, photos of you with the rest of employees and at your place of work, etc.). It's a lot of scrutiny of the company, far less of you, except to prove you've been paying taxes for the past 3 years as in December you apply the taxes for that year would not yet be completed nor due, so applying in December 2024 you would need to show taxes from 2022 and 2023.

 

You would get appointment letter by post. It gives you a date to show up, usually within a week, with the fee (a bit less than 200k if not married, a bit less than 100k if married to Thai). You show up there with your passport and fee, and lots of photos. At this time my address has changed from the one I've applied with, and that did not seem to be a problem. They would take your fingerprints, and keep the passport. If you're early, they may process it same day, else in a couple of days. When you return, they'll have a blue PR book (Certificate of residence) for you and passport with previous visas and extensions cancelled and an approval stamp for permanent residence.

 

With this, you go to police station of the area where address you gave immigration on day of appointment is located. There you would hand over some photographs and blue book and passport, and they'll take a couple of hours to hand fill out a red (Alien registration) book. Here you have a choice of making it for 1 or 6 years - pick 6 years unless you plan to move soon after that. With this done, you then go to district office with the landlord of the property (unless you own a condo in your name, then that's yourself) to get your name entered into the blue (House registration) book. In case of someone else owning property, there would be witnesses required.

 

Once you've completed this, you go to another counter and ask for your pink ID card for 60 baht and 15 minutes wait, and you're done.

 

I don't know, but I think it may be best to ask a lawyer or immigration officer on this. I've never heard of anyone that applied for both, and I don't think it would make sense to apply for PR if you're applying for citizenship, so your application might be denied, but whether that would affect the citizenship application I would not know.

Thanks for the detailed reply.  It seems weird that after getting PR one still has to apply for a WP. How stupid is that.... In any western country that would be unnecessary surely. 

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1 hour ago, impulse said:

 

It has a ton of relevance if the OP is examining only 2 of the several long stay options and both of them are expensive and/or time consuming, with the citizenship option also being extremely low probability. 

 

Retirement is probably the easiest, cheapest and most assured.  But only if the OP's over 50.

 

 

I disagree with your comment 100%. How can you say citizenship is low probability. It is untrue. Once the docs are submitted its a waiting game. But not impossible at all. Ive been reading about this for a while now and see many people get it. 

 

Retirement visa does not even compare. I have 3 yrs WP and taxes. Of course I will try to go down either PR or C. 

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5 hours ago, prakhonchai nick said:

I've had PR for 35 years now. Never considered citizenship, and have no need for more than PR

 

Unless you are into buying properties, or wanting to vote in Thailand, but just happy to enjoy daily life, then PR should be OK.

The only drawback with PR is that one still has to apply for WP's....

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26 minutes ago, ubonr1971 said:

The only drawback with PR is that one still has to apply for WP's....

All these shortenings... What means PR?

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2 hours ago, jayboy said:

 

Actually it does since it forms part of the points system for PR, I believe 10 points out of 100.Can't recall exact details but I think it's weighted towards those in middle age with fewer points for younger and older people.But overall you're right - it doesn't count for much.

 

Actually I'm skeptical about the application of the points system.Basically one has to fulfill some minimum criteria and that's it.But one has to look and sound okay, ideally earn quite a bit more than the minimum salary quoted and have paid lots of tax.I think quite a few people waste time on getting letters of support and collating charitable activities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was not legally married when I applied for and got PR 27 years ago.

 

I went to the old office at Soi Suan with a Thai friend who had been helping to prepare documents (his main purpose was to learn about PR and later start a paid service to help / advise PR applicants. We were both well dressed, white shirt, long pants, coat, polished shoes, recent haircut. We lodged the application documents and paid the lodging fee and walked out of that room.

 

Within 1 or 2 seconds an officer quickly came out into the hallway holding my application docs. He immediately said (in perfect English) "Are you xxx xxxxx?"

 

I responded "Yes". He continued "do you have about 2 or 2.5 hrs free time right now?"  I responded "yes".  He continued "If you wish I will do the interview right now".

I replied "Yes please".

 

He took me and my Thai friend into a smaller room and introduced himself properly and then said "Let me have about 5 to 10 minutes to properly read your application  docs".

 

Then he said "The main criteria for Thai PR is having already worked in Thailand with an official work permit (WP) and the work is contributing to the development of Thailand and having paid all your personal Thai taxation". He continued "The regulation is working for 3 years with a WP but in reality we don't consider PR applications with less than 7* years of continuous WPs and taxation clearance". (*This has since changed and it seems that 3 years is now accepted.)  

 

He continued "you 'qualify' re the 7 years, so let's continue with the interview:

 

- He looked at my advanced education documents and asked a number of relevant questions, which he preceded by saying "PR is to some extent reserved for foreigners who contribute knowledge and skills to the development of Thailand. So please tell me how your degree based knowledge is contributing". I explained then he said he wanted to talk to 2 or 3 of my Thai staff and he asked for 3 names of my direct staff and their tel. numbers and he asked if they could all speak English. I quickly found 3 names and tel numbers and confirmed "they all speak good English". He called each person and did ask for good relevant detail of how their knowledge and skills were improving under my supervision / guidance. And asked general question "Tell me more how you are personally benefiting from working this the foreigner mr. xx xxxx." They all mentioned we have good clear discussions and we have no hesitation to ask questions, make suggestions etc. 

 

- He asked what monetary plans / activities I had to support myself in old age.

- and more...

 

- My thai companion asked if being married to a Thai lady was a factor to gain PR.

 

- Immigration officer replied 'Well we would prefer to see a stable personal situation but in reality the application for PR is about you rather than any details of wife.

 

- More general discussion but no discussion in Thai language (this is 27 years ago).

 

The Immigration officer then said "This concludes the official interview and I am going to recommend that you be approved for PR. You will receive an official approval letter closer to the end of this year". He then asked If I had any further questions or discussion points. 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, DrJack54 said:

Permanent Resident 

If approved the foreigner receives a Certificate of Residence book (a PR book) which is issued for lifetime, there is no expiry date on any of the documents, there is no annual review or anything similar - It's issued for cheewit (lifetime). It automatically cancels on the death of the foreigner. A PR holder doesn't have to submit 90 days reports etc.  

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48 minutes ago, scorecard said:

 

I was not legally married when I applied for and got PR 27 years ago.

 

I went to the old office at Soi Suan with a Thai friend who had been helping to prepare documents (his main purpose was to learn about PR and later start a paid service to help / advise PR applicants. We were both well dressed, white shirt, long pants, coat, polished shoes, recent haircut. We lodged the application documents and paid the lodging fee and walked out of that room.

 

Within 1 or 2 seconds an officer quickly came out into the hallway holding my application docs. He immediately said (in perfect English) "Are you xxx xxxxx?"

 

I responded "Yes". He continued "do you have about 2 or 2.5 hrs free time right now?"  I responded "yes".  He continued "If you wish I will do the interview right now".

I replied "Yes please".

 

He took me and my Thai friend into a smaller room and introduced himself properly and then said "Let me have about 5 to 10 minutes to properly read your application  docs".

 

Then he said "The main criteria for Thai PR is having already worked in Thailand with an official work permit (WP) and the work is contributing to the development of Thailand and having paid all your personal Thai taxation". He continued "The regulation is working for 3 years with a WP but in reality we don't consider PR applications with less than 7* years of continuous WPs and taxation clearance". (*This has since changed and it seems that 3 years is now accepted.)  

 

He continued "you 'qualify' re the 7 years, so let's continue with the interview:

 

- He looked at my advanced education documents and asked a number of relevant questions, which he preceded by saying "PR is to some extent reserved for foreigners who contribute knowledge and skills to the development of Thailand. So please tell me how your degree based knowledge is contributing". I explained then he said he wanted to talk to 2 or 3 of my Thai staff and he asked for 3 names of my direct staff and their tel. numbers and he asked if they could all speak English. I quickly found 3 names and tel numbers and confirmed "they all speak good English". He called each person and did ask for good relevant detail of how their knowledge and skills were improving under my supervision / guidance. And asked general question "Tell me more how you are personally benefiting from working this the foreigner mr. xx xxxx." They all mentioned we have good clear discussions and we have no hesitation to ask questions, make suggestions etc. 

 

- He asked what monetary plans / activities I had to support myself in old age.

- and more...

 

- My thai companion asked if being married to a Thai lady was a factor to gain PR.

 

- Immigration officer replied 'Well we would prefer to see a stable personal situation but in reality the application for PR is about you rather than any details of wife.

 

- More general discussion but no discussion in Thai language (this is 27 years ago).

 

The Immigration officer then said "This concludes the official interview and I am going to recommend that you be approved for PR. You will receive an official approval letter closer to the end of this year". He then asked If I had any further questions or discussion points. 

 

 

 

One further point. I suspect most foreigners who might be interested to apply for Thai PR are aware that the rejection rate is very high. When I applied the regulation was that 50 foreigners could be approved from each approved country. but the reality is that only very small numbers actually get approved.

 

for the year I applied the total number of applications approved was 5 (five).

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