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No vaccine, no entry – the next challenge of Covid-19


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No vaccine, no entry – the next challenge of Covid-19
The Thaiger
 

OPINION

 

No-V-No-V.jpg

 

With the announcements this week about several vaccine candidate trials, either being completed or at the end of their Phase 3 testings, and the applications to government bodies for ‘emergency approval’, we now have to face the next question.

 

What restrictions will be imposed on those people who don’t have the vaccine, or even actively choose not to have the vaccine?


And more locally…

 

Will Thailand allow people to enter Thailand without first having the Covid-19 vaccine?

 

Given the Thai Government’s low-risk strategy, well almost zero-risk strategy, and reluctance to take any chances with a second wave of Covid 19, it is highly likely there will be a stipulation that anyone entering Thailand will need a vaccine certificate or stamp in their passports.


Couple this with the Thai population’s continued fear of allowing foreigners back into the country at this time, in poll after poll, and it’s a safe bet there will be a “no vaccine, no entry” restriction imposed.

 

On a positive note, the Thai government may drop the 14 day quarantine for people that have had the vaccine (but not in the early days).

 

At this stage we know that most of the vaccine trials have had a 95% efficacy. We also know that the leading BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine needs an original jab plus a booster and has to be transported at extremely low temperature.


To complicate matters, there is not yet sufficient evidence that having had a bout of Covid-19, whether asymptomatic or not, guarantees you immunity. Or, if it does, for how long?

 

All these factors will mean that some level of quarantine will probably be in force as the Thai government slowly re-opens its borders to a wider groups of vaccinated travellers. This would remain in force until the world has a better knowledge of both the proven efficacy of the vaccine, or vaccines, and the re-infection rates.

 

So, even if we start getting groups of the world’s populations vaccinated before the end of the year, and that’s still a very big IF, there’s a lot more water to pass under the bridge until a coherent, reliable vaccine strategy can be understood and implemented.

 

Then there will be a rump of people, either hard core anti-vaxxers, or others who are at least skeptical of a new vaccine, who will want to wait or not want the vaccine at all. Public education, some strong science and a successful roll out of the early vaccines will be a key to winning over a lot of the world’s population.

 

Somehow governments and health authorities are going to have to wind back much of the disinformation floating around the internet about vaccines that is so factually out of whack with reality, it’s going to be one of the greatest public health challenges of all time, to reassure people about the science of vaccines and vaccination.

 

All this, in the middle of a pandemic that, for now, is still on the ascendency as far as new cases and deaths are concerned.

 

But there is little doubt rejoining the world of international travel, even local travel, could become restricted to only those who are vaccinated. The rest will be stuck roaming around their own countries, or states, for… years with a raft of restrictions on their lives. Who knows.

 

Will shopping centres or public buildings also impose a “no vaccine, no entry” policy? Hotels? Public buildings? Job applications?

 

On top of the economic stress which has fallen on a lot of the world, with so many governments now facing the headwinds of deep recession, the vaccine ‘haves’ and ‘have nots’ will add even more public disquiet.

 

At this stage nobody is sure how the vaccine will be rolled out in Thailand. The Thai government has already signed up for several of the leading vaccine candidates and will most likely provide the vaccine for free to citizens under its public health system.

 

What does that mean for foreigners living here? If you are covered, with a work permit, under the country’s public health, are you able to get the vaccine for free too? Will the thousands of foreigners on private health insurance be covered?

 

Surely the insurers will want its customers to be vaccinated. Sick customers cost them money. So, will insurance renewals be limited to only people who have been vaccinated? Will visas be renewed only if you have been vaccinated?

 

At this stage there are no firm answers to any of these questions.

 

And then there is the SARS Cov2 virus (Covid-19) itself, a living virus which has the ability to mutate and adapt. Will these new vaccines be effective against all mutations? Again, this is all ahead of us.

 

We’re certainly now entering a new phase of this pandemic. New challenges, new questions. The rising numbers of cases throughout 2020 is only the first chapter of a book that will be many more years in the making.

 

Source: https://thethaiger.com/news/national/no-vaccine-no-entry-the-next-challenge-of-covid-19

 

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-- © Copyright The Thaiger 2020-11-24
 
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13 minutes ago, webfact said:

Will Thailand allow people to enter Thailand without first having the Covid-19 vaccine?

And does that mean their own Thai Nationals as well, since currently a pre-flight Covid test is not needed.

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1 minute ago, MadMuhammad said:

It’s looking likely that airlines may demand proof of vaccination. Qantas has already stated such 

Won't matter. Usual suspects will turn it into a Thailand only thing. 

This is great. No jab no fly. No Grey area, your in or stay home 

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32 minutes ago, webfact said:

No vaccine, no entry – the next challenge of Covid-19
The Thaiger
 

OPINION

 

No-V-No-V.jpg

 

With the announcements this week about several vaccine candidate trials, either being completed or at the end of their Phase 3 testings, and the applications to government bodies for ‘emergency approval’, we now have to face the next question.

 

What restrictions will be imposed on those people who don’t have the vaccine, or even actively choose not to have the vaccine?


And more locally…

 

Will Thailand allow people to enter Thailand without first having the Covid-19 vaccine?

 

Given the Thai Government’s low-risk strategy, well almost zero-risk strategy, and reluctance to take any chances with a second wave of Covid 19, it is highly likely there will be a stipulation that anyone entering Thailand will need a vaccine certificate or stamp in their passports.


Couple this with the Thai population’s continued fear of allowing foreigners back into the country at this time, in poll after poll, and it’s a safe bet there will be a “no vaccine, no entry” restriction imposed.

 

On a positive note, the Thai government may drop the 14 day quarantine for people that have had the vaccine (but not in the early days).

At this stage we know that most of the vaccine trials have had a 95% efficacy. We also know that the leading BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine needs an original jab plus a booster and has to be transported at extremely low temperature.


To complicate matters, there is not yet sufficient evidence that having had a bout of Covid-19, whether asymptomatic or not, guarantees you immunity. Or, if it does, for how long?

 

All these factors will mean that some level of quarantine will probably be in force as the Thai government slowly re-opens its borders to a wider groups of vaccinated travellers. This would remain in force until the world has a better knowledge of both the proven efficacy of the vaccine, or vaccines, and the re-infection rates.

 

So, even if we start getting groups of the world’s populations vaccinated before the end of the year, and that’s still a very big IF, there’s a lot more water to pass under the bridge until a coherent, reliable vaccine strategy can be understood and implemented.

 

Then there will be a rump of people, either hard core anti-vaxxers, or others who are at least skeptical of a new vaccine, who will want to wait or not want the vaccine at all. Public education, some strong science and a successful roll out of the early vaccines will be a key to winning over a lot of the world’s population.

 

Somehow governments and health authorities are going to have to wind back much of the disinformation floating around the internet about vaccines that is so factually out of whack with reality, it’s going to be one of the greatest public health challenges of all time, to reassure people about the science of vaccines and vaccination.

 

All this, in the middle of a pandemic that, for now, is still on the ascendency as far as new cases and deaths are concerned.

 

But there is little doubt rejoining the world of international travel, even local travel, could become restricted to only those who are vaccinated. The rest will be stuck roaming around their own countries, or states, for… years with a raft of restrictions on their lives. Who knows.

 

Will shopping centres or public buildings also impose a “no vaccine, no entry” policy? Hotels? Public buildings? Job applications?

On top of the economic stress which has fallen on a lot of the world, with so many governments now facing the headwinds of deep recession, the vaccine ‘haves’ and ‘have nots’ will add even more public disquiet.

 

At this stage nobody is sure how the vaccine will be rolled out in Thailand. The Thai government has already signed up for several of the leading vaccine candidates and will most likely provide the vaccine for free to citizens under its public health system.

 

What does that mean for foreigners living here? If you are covered, with a work permit, under the country’s public health, are you able to get the vaccine for free too? Will the thousands of foreigners on private health insurance be covered?

 

Surely the insurers will want its customers to be vaccinated. Sick customers cost them money. So, will insurance renewals be limited to only people who have been vaccinated? Will visas be renewed only if you have been vaccinated?

 

At this stage there are no firm answers to any of these questions.

 

And then there is the SARS Cov2 virus (Covid-19) itself, a living virus which has the ability to mutate and adapt. Will these new vaccines be effective against all mutations? Again, this is all ahead of us.

 

We’re certainly now entering a new phase of this pandemic. New challenges, new questions. The rising numbers of cases throughout 2020 is only the first chapter of a book that will be many more years in the making.

 

Source: https://thethaiger.com/news/national/no-vaccine-no-entry-the-next-challenge-of-covid-19

 

thtthaiger.png

-- © Copyright The Thaiger 2020-11-24
 

 

I wouldn't mind getting a shot before travelling to Thailand. 

 

Working in the pharmaceutical industry for 13+ years at a company that produces insulin and i know how insanely hard it is to get a new product approved, so I'm not to worried about FDA or EMA approving a product that is not thoroughly tested.

 

I just want an option to choose which vaccine I get. 

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No vaccine, no entry. That makes sense.

If anybody has a certified medical reason for no vaccine that might be acceptable.

But for all those people who just don't like a vaccine: No problem, do that wherever you come from and stay there.

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Thailand will probably consider reducing the quarantine to 10 days as long as you have had the vaccine a d  got a certificate signed by 3 different doctors

Then they will need another 6 months to discuss it before making a decision that it can be reduced to 12 days. 

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Will be the same basically in every country: Vaccination not compulsory in most countries, but here's the list of things you can't do until you have been vaccinated  ... and international travel will head the list, followed by domestic travel by plane.

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It has been said long time ago , and it makes sense doesn't it . If you want to fly , you need the vaccine . This way , everybody on that plane is vaccinated and all special measures can be out . Also , when arriving , you do not need quarantine , since all people arriving got that vaccine .

Anti vaxxers can do what they want , but they are staying home , or maybe come by land/sea and stay 2 weeks in quarantine with all measures as they are now . I expect news from the airline industry fast , like Qantas did already , and from many countries also , as soon as the 1st approvals are done . Now is too soon , since none of the vaccines is approved for use yet , can't say anything now , which might go belly up in next couple of weeks ( which i do not expect since 1st 3 candidates all say they got a working safe vaccine ... would surprise me if not 2 out of 3 make it at least ) .

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I will be first in the queue once my age group is reached.

No vaccine no travel simple as.

If you want to continue with your conspiracy theories that's fine stay at home

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1 hour ago, thaibeachlovers said:

Talk about putting the cart before the horse. Not one person ( other than in trials ) has been vaccinated yet and 8 billion to go.

 

Not how I would put it. I would say we can now see the light at the end of the tunnel. 

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3 minutes ago, Chivas said:

I will be first in the queue once my age group is reached.

No vaccine no travel simple as.

If you want to continue with your conspiracy theories that's fine stay at home

Absolutely. 

Free to be an anti vaccer.

Just better accept the consequences!

 

 

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22 minutes ago, Phuketshrew said:

I wonder if they will insist that it has to be a Thai developed vaccine? It could be another money spinner.

No. Its clear that they won't. 

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Proof of vaccination would make sense, and is not something new. I remember when I was young – Okay, I admit it's looong time ago – the I needed an international vaccination passbook, with the right vaccination stamps in it, to be allowed into certain countries. The health check required for certain visas both today, and before the Covid-19 outbreak, already include to be free from some diseases that the authorities don't wish to be imported. So same-same, and not so different...:thumbsup:

 

Up to recently – and perhaps still – many travellers would get vaccinations to protect themselves when travelling; when I first time visited Thailand in 1987 a number of vaccinations were recommended, and all sensible tourists would get them...🙂

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Several false info posts re the coronavirus have been removed, along with a trolling post and replies.

 

A reminder of the ThaiVisa policy on coronavirus posting, which reads in part:

 

UPDATED NOTICE TO MEMBERS POSTING ON THAIVISA AMID COVID-19 - 25 MARCH 2020

...

Any posts or topics which our moderation team deems to be scaremongering, deliberately misleading or has been posted to deliberately distort information will be removed without warning. You may also be subject to a posting suspension or have your profile permanently suspended from the site.

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It will be safe to assume that now everybody will jump on the " no vaccine no go" mantra, we will most likely here it more and more often into the begging of the new year...

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sorry about my stupid question.
The best of these vaccines will have a effectiveness of 95%. On the other hand, the mortality of sars-cov-2 is 2.3%.
Would that mean, even with a vaccination the mortality will not decrease?
Furthermore,  most of those fatality patients had underlaying conditions of any kind of sickness or age. Will be this vaccine effective with this precondition or are these the 5% causality.

Anyways, for sure I will not take any vaccine from a 3th world country. If I get forced, and that will be the case because I work worldwide, the vaccine must come from Germany.

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I should imagine that no vaccine will mean no entry - as simple as that.

 

As for whether it is Thai or German vaccine, that probably will not matter as long as you have a valid certificate.

 

If you refuse to be vaccinated, well then Thailand will not be an option.

 

As for those of us resident here, as vaccination of the population becomes widespread, then I imagine we will either have to "go private" or pay " Falang prices" at the local government hospital. I would again imagine that a vaccination certificate will be required for our next extension of permission to stay.

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