Jump to content

Car been idle for 3 years, change tyres?


Recommended Posts

Our has car has been standing idle (in a covered carport) for nearly 3 years, not been driven since we left Thailand, but we have someone to turn on the engine for 15 minutes once a month.

I'm worried that the tyres have dried out, really a shame because i replaced the tyres with expensive michellin a few months before we left Thailand.

Does anyone know if tyres should be replaced after x years?

The motoroil needs to be replaced ofcourse, are there any other things that degrade faster when idle? Maybe the brake hoses or other rubber parts?

 

Thanks guys
 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 141
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Oil change - Why ? No driving means not contaminated. If it absorbs a bit of water a blast down the hiway will get rid of it. Coolant - only if old. Nothing to go wrong by sitting there. Tir

Fuel goes stale/bad, you need to drain the whole fuel system and refill with fresh (higher octane that normal) fuel for a tank or two. The higher octane without ethanol in it is more 'forgiving, lubri

The tires may have flat spots on them   but you would know pretty quickly if it was a problem just by driving the car as the car is not exposed to the intense UV sunlight I would have though the tires

Posted Images

Interesting comments and thanks for the subject. I've a car back in home country, which has been sitting for most of 3+ years. I 'may' go back in March and will face the same concerns; although, I changed its oil and had the transmission serviced with trans-oil change before I left, hoping to cut down any settling 'sludge'.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/16/2021 at 6:21 PM, Velleman said:

Ah yes ofcourse coolant too. It's an automatics yes.
Will have the car serviced and the tyres checked for cracks and flat spots. I don't know if i can trust B-quik on that matter though, they'll probably recommend new tyres.
 

Just do what Johng said. I wouldn't change the coolant though 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/17/2021 at 8:02 AM, seedy said:

Oil change - Why ? No driving means not contaminated.

 

Because manufacturers recommend that oil changes are made at mileage intervals or after time periods, regardless of whether the vehicle has been driven.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/16/2021 at 6:06 PM, Velleman said:

I'm worried that the tyres have dried out, really a shame because i replaced the tyres with expensive michellin a few months before we left Thailand.

Does anyone know if tyres should be replaced after x years?

The motoroil needs to be replaced ofcourse, are there any other things that degrade faster when idle? Maybe the brake hoses or other rubber parts?

Just give them a quick visual inspection for signs of cracks etc.

If they look good drive to a tyre service station and get the balance checked, they'll soon tell you if they're ok or they have a flat spot..

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Shelf life 5 years but not in high uv, production date is on them. Is it petrol or diesel and if it is petrol and had gasahol  in it needs to be removed and the tank cleaned

before you try starting it

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The 15 minute runs are not enough to get the oil hot, so moisture can build up in the oil creating an acid that wouldnt be good. Check the date code on your tyres when you get back and if greater than 5 years old replace them. They might look ok, but could develop hard spots which could cause a tyre failure while on the move and that would be bad. Probably a good idea to replace the brake fluid as that absorbs moisture, battery also may need replacing depending on how well the car starts.

The fuel tends to go off over time, so top up the tank and go for a good drive. Replace used fuel with new and the fuel will be good in a few days.

I have a BT50 that hasnt been driven by me in 2 years (funny about that) but fortunately the car is used occasionally by friends who are looking after it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Liverpool Lou said:

Because manufacturers recommend that oil changes are made at mileage intervals or after time periods, regardless of whether the vehicle has been driven.

Definitely cheaper than blowing a head gasket or worse.

  • Haha 2
  • Confused 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hydraulic fluid for the breaks! Should actually be replaced every year even if the car is used. You might get some water in the fluid and if you drive fast and break hard the water can turn in to bubbles and that might cause your breaks to fail.

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/17/2021 at 9:43 AM, transam said:

I would be surprised if you have a tyre problem. New tyres can sit on the shelf for up to three years before they are sold as being new.

Not quite the same thing. Sitting still with the weight on the tyres the walls will have been stretched in a particular spot. This can lead to a blow out at speed so a great deal of caution is necessary.

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, MrJ2U said:
35 minutes ago, Liverpool Lou said:

Because manufacturers recommend that oil changes are made at mileage intervals or after time periods, regardless of whether the vehicle has been driven.

Definitely cheaper than blowing a head gasket or worse.

Why would not changing the oil result in the head gasket blowing?

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/16/2021 at 6:21 PM, Velleman said:

Ah yes ofcourse coolant too. It's an automatics yes.
Will have the car serviced and the tyres checked for cracks and flat spots. I don't know if i can trust B-quik on that matter though, they'll probably recommend new tyres.
 

The coolant will be OK,  and I be surprised if your tyre are not OK. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Kwasaki said:

OP if you follow some of the ridiculous advice from many here you better dump the truck at the breakers and buy a new one. 😂😂😂😇

I was thinking the same thing too......😋

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Liverpool Lou said:

Because manufacturers recommend that oil changes are made at mileage intervals or after time periods, regardless of whether the vehicle has been driven.

And what will happen to the oil, contained in a crankcase, out of the weather ?

Nuttin'

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, lesmac said:

and if it is petrol and had gasahol  in it needs to be removed and the tank cleaned

before you try starting it

Nonsense

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Tropposurfer said:

Fuel goes stale/bad, you need to drain the whole fuel system and refill with fresh (higher octane that normal) fuel for a tank or two. The higher octane without ethanol in it is more 'forgiving, lubricating, richer' on all the moving parts such as pistons and valves and supports the running in after standing. Ask the local dealer if this is safe to do as some very new, small cylinder cars might not like this.

 

Personally I would never drive a car after it has been sitting for so long without a through mechanical inspection. Animals eat lines and other parts that the mind boggles at how they could eat such stuff but they do. Rats and mice especially.

All fluid levels e.g. coolant, and all oils should be checked, even diff and gearbox.

All water hoses, fan-belts/ s-belts checked.

As for driving around on tyres that old after leaving them standing that long (being new 2 years ago doesn't mean a thing) and left in such constant heat (under cover or not) is in my opinion an unsafe idea.

If you wanna take the risk of not seeing obvious cracks and risk have a catastrophic tyre failure driving along; up to you as they say.

I would change the tyres out, align, balance, and have the brakes and brake lines checked at the same time.

As an aside for future reference OP's - ideally any car left standing for many months to a year or more should be lifted so there is almost no weight on the tyres (just touching the ground is okay or just up off the ground) to avoid flat spots.

Driving with solid flat spots after resting a car will probably throw your alignment out and then you'll need a balance and alignment anyway.

It will put considerable strain on the whole steering rack system, and could see you with bush and other issues later.

If jacking up a car of course it has to be on proper lock-pin car stands or solid large enough stable wood blocks so it can't be pushed over with sideways pushing.

I would also (as others have said) change out the engine oils and filter. The reason for this is that over time the metal and carbon particles that are floating around in the old oil settle out. It's good to flush these tiny particles away with a clean oil and new filter. Some mechanics use a little extra fresh oil when draining the block to help flush this <deleted> out of the block before replacing the welch plug and refilling. 

This flushing will support less wear on valves, injectors (if you got them) etc. The older the car, the less quality and regularity of service makes this oil change more important than say a near new car stood up for a few years.

You are a salesman or someone who knows zero of practical use of motor vehicles left unused for long periods of time. 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Kwasaki said:

You are a salesman or someone who knows zero of practical use of motor vehicles left unused for long periods of time. 

The welsh plug bit got me thinking! 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Tropposurfer said:

Fuel goes stale/bad, you need to drain the whole fuel system and refill with fresh (higher octane that normal) fuel for a tank or two. The higher octane without ethanol in it is more 'forgiving, lubricating, richer' on all the moving parts such as pistons and valves and supports the running in after standing. Ask the local dealer if this is safe to do as some very new, small cylinder cars might not like this.

 

Personally I would never drive a car after it has been sitting for so long without a through mechanical inspection. Animals eat lines and other parts that the mind boggles at how they could eat such stuff but they do. Rats and mice especially.

All fluid levels e.g. coolant, and all oils should be checked, even diff and gearbox.

All water hoses, fan-belts/ s-belts checked.

As for driving around on tyres that old after leaving them standing that long (being new 2 years ago doesn't mean a thing) and left in such constant heat (under cover or not) is in my opinion an unsafe idea.

If you wanna take the risk of not seeing obvious cracks and risk have a catastrophic tyre failure driving along; up to you as they say.

I would change the tyres out, align, balance, and have the brakes and brake lines checked at the same time.

As an aside for future reference OP's - ideally any car left standing for many months to a year or more should be lifted so there is almost no weight on the tyres (just touching the ground is okay or just up off the ground) to avoid flat spots.

Driving with solid flat spots after resting a car will probably throw your alignment out and then you'll need a balance and alignment anyway.

It will put considerable strain on the whole steering rack system, and could see you with bush and other issues later.

If jacking up a car of course it has to be on proper lock-pin car stands or solid large enough stable wood blocks so it can't be pushed over with sideways pushing.

I would also (as others have said) change out the engine oils and filter. The reason for this is that over time the metal and carbon particles that are floating around in the old oil settle out. It's good to flush these tiny particles away with a clean oil and new filter. Some mechanics use a little extra fresh oil when draining the block to help flush this <deleted> out of the block before replacing the welch plug and refilling. 

This flushing will support less wear on valves, injectors (if you got them) etc. The older the car, the less quality and regularity of service makes this oil change more important than say a near new car stood up for a few years.

What a load of Horse Hockey

My HD sat in a steel crate for almost 7 years, full of gasahol.

Drain old fuel, fill with fresh fuel, install new battery - ride away.

No change, inspect, search for non existent floating crud from who knows where, ...

Fuel injectors are in contact with engine oil !!! 555

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Liverpool Lou said:

Why would not changing the oil result in the head gasket blowing?

I was thinking the very same thing sir

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Eaglekott said:

Hydraulic fluid for the breaks! Should actually be replaced every year even if the car is used. You might get some water in the fluid and if you drive fast and break hard the water can turn in to bubbles and that might cause your breaks to fail.

Who told you that rubbish? Brake fluid is recommended to be changed every 4 or 5 years not every year.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...