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Education inequality – The state school teachers’ dilemma


snoop1130
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At 332.4 billion baht, for yet another year Thailand’s Ministry of Education has received the largest budget of any ministry. In 2021, this major agency received budget just under 358.4 billion baht. The enormous amount of money pouring into the country’s education system has produced disappointing results.

 

Thai students’ academic performance has scored very low in international evaluations for several consecutive years. According to the IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2020, Thailand was placed 55th out of 63 countries. In the EF English Proficiency test, organised by Education First in 2019, Thailand was placed 74th out of 100 countries, which means the country ranks third from the bottom for English proficiency among ASEAN nations.

 

We all know something has gone wrong in our education system, but what exactly is it? Thai PBS World spoke to public school teachers about Thai education, which they describe as being in a dilemma.

 

Full Story: https://www.thaipbsworld.com/op-ed-education-inequality-the-state-school-teachers-dilemma/

 

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-- © Copyright Thai PBS 2022-01-17
 

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14 hours ago, snoop1130 said:

The enormous amount of money pouring into the country’s education system has produced disappointing results.

I was going to say a huge sum for little return... but they already spotted that.

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3 minutes ago, rct99q said:

The biggest challenge, again in my opinion, is keeping kids engaged in the learning process.

 

Just leaving the school system, by itself, to educate your child I feel is the leading cause of many of the issues going on today.

A cane in the corner of the classroom always kept me successfully 'engaged in the learning process'.

 

I doubt many rural Thai farmers have much education either. In the past, when the school was the only source of education there were no such issues. Treating schools as 'entertainment' venues and expecting parents to 'educate' is the source of the problem and not the answer to the problem IMHO.

Edited by BritManToo
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23 minutes ago, rct99q said:

My daughter has been educated in both Canada and Thailand. Two years in Canada  (grades 1 & 2), two  years in Thailand (k3, grade 3), and has enjoyed both systems.

 

To those that  talk  about not passing students who fail a grade here in Thailand would help, the same issue happens in Canada. In my opinion holding students back is not a viable option.

 

I also disagree with the notion students should be able to question how teachers, teach. That should be a coordinated effort between the school, teachers, parents, and children. Based on the curriculum as decided upon by governing bodies.

 

The biggest challenge, again in my opinion, is keeping kids engaged in the learning process. In Canada parents were certainly more involved in the child's education. I see little involvement of parents here. Parents seem to be either working,  split families, children living with grandparents, or with older siblings.

 

In speaking with, and reading about, other parents and the difficulty they have had during this pandemic to keep their children entertained  being a struggle. This leads me to believe there was not a lot of parental influence before the pandemic. Just leaving the school system, by itself, to educate your child I feel is the leading cause of many of the issues going on today.

 

How to get parents, or guardians, more engaged in the process?!

 

Obviously the system here is broken. The real unfortunate part is the huge amount of money that is being spent on education,

yet it is the students who are least benefiting from it.

 

 

Just on another note about the quality of teachers. It is possible we have been very lucky, but my daughter has in her short stint so far as a student had only one teacher that has been an issue. Of the 20 or so others she has nothing but great things to say. From her K3 teacher Ms. Poi, to grade one Mrs. S, and her grade three Thai teachers whom have all been wonderful so far. Even with early struggles of online learning, she had teachers here drop off home work, provided additional learning material, and even have her assist in her English class with other students. 

 

She attends a Catholic school that follows the government education system. It is not a private school. Cost, about 6,000BHT per term. Including lunch. In Canada, government school, fees about $450 per year. No lunch provided. 

 

 

 

Supportive of your comments.

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25 minutes ago, brian2f2f said:

I've met so many Thai English teachers with a BA in English yet they can't even begin to talk with me in English. I've had many Thais that study English as their degree program that the teacher can't speak English and 80% or more of the entire course is strictly grammar so they have little to no vocabulary and have no idea at all how to communicate. Yes that's all through a barely understandable Google translate conversation. 

I do think that throughout Asia when faced with, "a loss of face" students are very hesitant to practice using their English language knowledge. I was impressed when studying in Shianghai decades ago with a taxi driver listening to the government supplied English lessons over the radio who wished very much to try out his English while I struggled with the Mandarin I was studying.

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48 minutes ago, BritManToo said:

Disagree,

Technology is generally a distraction from education.

All you need to educate children is decent text books for the kids and a blackboard with chalk for the teachers.

Why limit the greater knowledge to be gained through the use of technology. Having taught during the technological revolution, while I could tach history by the means you state, I could make history much more interesting for students having today's access to broader resources via computers/internet. I have certainly been impressed with Thailand's wide availability of internet access.

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