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Right of way?


Will B Good
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You are at a junction, the lights are RED, but you are permitted to turn left against the red light (not sure why other countries don't do this).

 

The oncoming traffic has a GREEN light and there are cars turning right (their right that is)........who has right of way?

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In other countries where a left (or right) turn on red is with the proviso that all other traffic at that junction are not also wanting to drive or turn into the space where you intend to go.  I think when curbside turning on a red is allowed (in any country) it is last on the list of right of way.

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Here in Buriram, when opposing lights both change green together, the usual procedure is that cars that want to turn right expect to go before those going straight on. When I happen to be on "pole position" and am going straight, I invariably force the issue and make the wayward drivers turning right stop and allow me to go first........as is my right. Police are often in attendance, but as one would expect never do anything!

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Simple - Turn left when ‘safe to do so’...

 

The oncoming traffic, turning to their right has ‘right of way’.

*IF signage permits so, turn left when clear. 

 

 

*Not all junctions permit turning left at a red light, some junctions have signs which state ‘left turn on red prohibited’... 

 

Not really a big deal - If its clear, just turn left unless there is an obvious sign.

 

 

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USA does this everywhere unless posted NO TURN ON RED (sometimes with times of day included). Of course it's a right a RIGHT turn on red there. The old saying...Turn right on red WITH CAUTION.

 

Either way, the oncoming traffic with the green light has the legal right-of-way. Of course T. I. T., so the bigger vehicle‼️🤣

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32 minutes ago, prakhonchai nick said:

Here in Buriram, when opposing lights both change green together, the usual procedure is that cars that want to turn right expect to go before those going straight on. When I happen to be on "pole position" and am going straight, I invariably force the issue and make the wayward drivers turning right stop and allow me to go first........as is my right. Police are often in attendance, but as one would expect never do anything!

Exactly the same occurs in some of the Northern towns. (And I do the same as you.)

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1 hour ago, bluemoon58 said:

I have to say Will, this made me really chuckle. This is Thailand, the right of way is to the bravest that muscles their way out first...!!! Even the Police here don't have a clue! 

OK, the most simple question in this regard. Just theoretically (and in case an insurance might be invorved): Is it

1. Right before left or

2. Left before right

on a crossing without lights ?

 

My wife has a Thai Driving license - recently made - and she does not know. From the behaviour on the streets the truth cannot be derived as I see it. Actually nobody seems to know for sure or even worse they think they know but this knowledge is not confirmed and acknowleged by others. Thats why they move all so slowly at crossings without lights I suppose.

Edited by moogradod
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1 hour ago, richard_smith237 said:

Simple - Turn left when ‘safe to do so’...

 

The oncoming traffic, turning to their right has ‘right of way’.

*IF signage permits so, turn left when clear. 

 

 

*Not all junctions permit turning left at a red light, some junctions have signs which state ‘left turn on red prohibited’... 

 

Not really a big deal - If its clear, just turn left unless there is an obvious sign.

 

 

correct it is called " stop slow down and proceed with caution " 

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In Australia  where a sign indicates, it is permisable to turn left on red light, after stopping, then proceeding to turn left as long traffic from the right through the green is not interfered with. This has been a Traffic Act Law in most States for a decade or more.

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If turning left on a red where permitted, the traffic coming from your right on a green has right of way (as written above).

 

Now how about right of way on roundabouts anyone? I'm from the UK and we drive on left same as here in Thailand. We must give way to anyone already on the roundabout (i.e. going round clockwise and from the right). Many, many, times here in Thailand I have been aproaching a roundabout and traffic already on the roundabout - nearly always motorycycles - has stopped whilst going around the roundabout. Seems dangerous to me.

 

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1 minute ago, soi3eddie said:

If turning left on a red where permitted, the traffic coming from your right on a green has right of way (as written above).

 

Now how about right of way on roundabouts anyone? I'm from the UK and we drive on left same as here in Thailand. We must give way to anyone already on the roundabout (i.e. going round clockwise and from the right). Many, many, times here in Thailand I have been aproaching a roundabout and traffic already on the roundabout - nearly always motorycycles - has stopped whilst going around the roundabout. Seems dangerous to me.

 

The roundabout I drive frequently has a sign (in Thai) saying what you have stated ["We must give way to anyone already on the roundabout (i.e. going round clockwise and from the right)."]

 

....and just like you, I see many already in the roundabout stopping and giving way to those getting ready to enter the roundabout.

 

That doesn't surprise me as Thais have no idea how to merge. Sadly many drivers in my home country have that same issue with not knowing how to properly merge.

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I think that the confusion with roundabouts is because there are so few of them in Thailand.

At a crossroads with no defined right of way, you must (or should) give way to the left. Many Thais think that this also applies on roundabouts, but it is the opposite, give way to the right.

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9 minutes ago, loong said:

I think that the confusion with roundabouts is because there are so few of them in Thailand.

At a crossroads with no defined right of way, you must (or should) give way to the left. Many Thais think that this also applies on roundabouts, but it is the opposite, give way to the right.

In many parts of Europe you have to give way to traffic entering the roundabout.

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19 hours ago, Will B Good said:

The oncoming traffic has a GREEN light and there are cars turning right (their right that is)........who has right of way?

They do as they are moving under  a green light and therefore have priority... you are allowed to "slip into the lane" if it is clear to do so.

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unfortunately in Thailand the law means nothing, the arrogant/uneducated drivers will always force the issue and do as they please ignoring the law completely, while vehicles turning left at a red light should give way many do not. If you are facing a red light you do not have any right of way what so ever over cars with a green light and must always give way to them, same as the idiots that drive straight through  stop signs etc, many drivers think the laws do not apply to them or simply do not undestand/know them.

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