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Hitman guns down loan businessman "Sia Piak" in hail of bullets in Saraburi


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Picture: Thai Rath

 

Thai Rath reported on the death of a man called "Sia Piak" - a former bank manager turned businessman for loans. 

 

He was shot 14 times while out exercising near his home by someone believed to be a hired gunman.

 

Muang Saraburi police received a report of the shooting at 9.30 pm yesterday in Soi 19 of Phichai Ranarong Songkhram Road in Muang district of the central Thailand city.

 

Somphen Punnarattanakul, 58, who lived nearby was dead in the road dressed in sportswear.

 

There was evidence of 11mm bullet wounds in his chest, abdomen, arms and legs and 14 casings adjacent to the body.

 

A female relative called Pornphimon, 36, said Somphen retired early from a job as a bank manager and went into buying and selling property and the loans business. He became rather wealthy, she observed, with ten million baht in the bank.

 

His exwife was dead and he had a new one. He loved skateboarding and would often go out to exercise and play with friends. 

 

He'd been out playing basketball, had dinner then gone out for a walk in the secluded soi.

 

She heard the shots while she was taking a shower, she said. Then someone came to say her uncle had been gunned down. 

 

She said she had no idea why anyone would do this as her uncle had no known problems with anyone.

 

He was a loud speaker who like to drink, loved fitness and had no sex on the side issues, she believed. His new wife had just returned to Isaan as her father was sick in hospital.

 

Pol Col Chetchai Chetsiri, chief of the Muang Saraburi police refused to be drawn on why the shooting had happened saying they were still gathering evidence and speaking to witnesses. 

 

Though he conceded that it was likely that it was connected to the deceased's business interests. 

 

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A grammar police post has been removed:

 

3. If possible please proofread your post first, poor grammar and spelling can make the post difficult to understand. However be aware that not every member is a native English speaker and excessive posts regarding others spelling and grammar not only hijacks the topic but is poor netiquette.

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5 minutes ago, JustAnotherHun said:

Occupational hazard of a loan shark....

Wonder if he carried death insurance?

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3 hours ago, BritManToo said:

Do they mean .45ACP?

2 magazines worth of bullets.

Might be the Glock 30, magazine capacity of 10+1 up the spout.

Seems the "double-tap" was taken to extreme with a few extra.

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3 hours ago, canopus1969 said:

No, 11mm is 11 mm - not .45

"evidence of 11mm bullet wounds"

There is not wrong answer, until they pull the slugs out.

Both make 11mm holes ...

 "45 caliber" firearm has a barrel diameter of roughly 0.45 inches (11 mm)"

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“The 45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol) or 45 Auto (11.43×23mm) is a rimless straight-walled handgun cartridge designed by John Moses Browning in 1904, ..” 

 

For all you Guns & Ammo pistolheads out there ….who should know this. 11mm = .45 ins. for ammo definition purposes

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4 hours ago, webfact said:

She said she had no idea why anyone would do this as her uncle had no known problems with anyone.

A loan shark who no one had problems with?

 

Yeah, right, sure...

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11 minutes ago, WhiteBuffaloATM said:

“Never a Borrower or Lender, Be” C. Dickens, I think ( Macawber character from “Hard Times”) ?

It's from Shakespeare's Hamlet, advice given by Polonius to his son.

 

Some believe it was not meant to be taken at face value but was in fact mocking a persona that likes the sound of it's own voice.

Edited by Bluespunk
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4 hours ago, BritManToo said:

Do they mean .45ACP?

2 magazines worth of bullets.

11.43mm - but who's counting.  😉

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8 minutes ago, digger70 said:

There is No 11mm Bullet ,they are All in Imperial Measurements

Tell it to Wikipedia......or complain to Boris....😁

😉

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48 minutes ago, Thujone said:

Possibly, but the line that follows is also interesting.

"Neither a borrower nor a lender be; / For loan oft loses both itself and friend."

 

I've used the full quote when people have asked me for a loan.

It confuses them at least, until they realise they have no chance.

If you read the entire speech that this quote is taken from it is clear that Shakespeare is mocking Polonius [and the character type that he was parodying] and his manner of speech.

 

However it is also true that quotes taken out of context can take on a new meaning and purpose.

 

''Never a lender or borrower be'' is clearly such an example of this. 

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